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Praan
"Stream of Life" is a Bengali poem from Gitanjali
Gitanjali
written by Indian Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore. Named "Praan" and sung by Palbasha Siddique, it has been used as the background score for Matt Harding's "Dancing 2008" video
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Bengali Language
অবহট্টOld BengaliDialectssee Bengali dialectsWriting system Eastern Nagari script
Eastern Nagari script
(Bengali alphabet) Bengali BrailleSigned formsBengali signed forms[4]Official statusOfficial language in Bangladesh   India
India
(in West Bengal, Tripura
Tripura
& Southern Assam)Regulated by Bangla Academy Paschimbanga Bangla AkademiLanguage codesISO 639-1 bnISO 639-2 benISO 639-3 benGlottolog beng1280[5]Linguasphere 59-AAF-uBengali speaking region of South AsiaBengali speakers around the worldThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Bengali text
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Raja (play)
Raja (Bengali: রাজা), (also known as The King of the Dark Chamber in English translation), is a play by Rabindranath Tagore written in 1910.[1][2] This play is marked as a symbolic play as well as a ‘mystic play’.[2] The story is loosely borrowed from the Buddhist story of King Kush from Mahāvastu.[1] A short stage version of Raja was published under the title of Arupratan in 1920.[1] Sukumar Sen described Raja as ‘the first really symbolic drama by Tagore.’[1] The theme of the play is ‘the secret dealing of God with the human heart.[2] References[edit]^ a b c d Sen, Sukumar (1979) [1960]. History of Bengali Literature (3rd ed.). New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi. pp. 279–80. ISBN 81-7201-107-5.  ^ a b c Ghosh, Sisirkumar (1990). Rabindranath Tagore. Makers of Indian Literature (1st ed.). New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi
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Bhanusimha Thakurer Padabali
Bhanusimha Thakurer Padabali
Bhanusimha Thakurer Padabali
(Bengali: ভানুসিংহ ঠাকুরের পদাবলী, Bhanushingho Thakurer Padabali; lit. The Songs of Bhanushingho Thakur) is a collection of Vaishnava
Vaishnava
lyrics composed in Brajabuli by Rabindranath Tagore. It was published in 1884. These lyrics, which were earlier brought out in several issues of Bharati magazine, were first anthologized in 1884. Later, Tagore described composing these songs in his reminiscences Jiban Smriti. Rabindranath Tagore
Rabindranath Tagore
wrote his first substantial poems titled Bhanusimha Thakurer Padabali
Bhanusimha Thakurer Padabali
in Brajabuli under the pseudonym Bhānusiṃha ("Sun Lion") at age sixteen. The anthology has 22 songs out of which only nine exists in Swarabitan (Vol
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Rabindra Sangeet
GenresPoetry Novels Science fiction Folk literature TarjaInstitutionsLiterary institutions Bangiya Sahitya Parishad Paschimbanga Bangla Akademi Bangla AcademyAwardsLiterary awards Rabindra Puraskar Bangla Academy
Bangla Academy
Literary Award Ananda PuraskarMusic and performing artsMusicMediaCinema of Bangladesh Cinema of West BengalSportKabaddi Boli Khela Lathi khela Chaturaṅga Kho kho Bengal portalv t eDance accompanied by Rabindra Sangeet
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Gitabitan
Gitabitan
Gitabitan
("Garden of songs") is a book forming a collection of all 2,232 songs (Rabindra Sangeet) written by Bengali polymath Rabindranath Tagore.[1][2]Contents1 Editions 2 Themes 3 Other collections 4 References 5 External linksEditions[edit] The first edition of three volumes was published in 1931 and 1932, and contained the songs in chronological order. To make the collection more user-friendly, Tagore revised the book and arranged the songs by theme. The revised edition of the first two volumes was published in 1941, the year when Tagore died. Volume three, which included all of Tagore's dance-drama's, was published in 1950
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Amar Sonar Bangla
Bangla (Bengali: বাংলা) is the endonym (native name) of Bengal, a geographical and ethno-linguistic region in South Asia, or of the Bengali language, an eastern Indo-Aryan language
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Birpurush (poem)
"Birpurush" (Bengali: বীরপুরুষ) (The Hero) is a Bengali poem written by Rabindranath Tagore. The poem depicts a child fantasising that he saves his mother from dacoits.[1][2] In the evening when the sun is set they reach a barren place. There is not a single soul there. Even the cattle have returned home. Plodding silence reigns there. The mother is a bit afraid and wonders where they have arrived! The child assures her and tells there is a small river ahead.[a] The mother sees a shimmering light and asks her son about it. Suddenly they hear the cry "Ha re, re re, re re"[b] as a band of dacoits attacks their caravan. The mother shivers inside the palanquin; the palanquin-bearers hide in the bush. The son assures the mother, and confronts the dacoits courageously. A fight follows in which the son emerges victorious
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Chitto Jetha Bhayshunyo
Where the mind is without fear (Bengali: চিত্ত যেথা ভয়শূন্য।, translit. Chitto Jetha Bhoyshunno) is a poem written by Rabindranath Tagore
Rabindranath Tagore
before India's independence. It represents Tagore's vision of a new and awakened India
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Ekla Chalo Re
Jodi Tor Dak Shune Keu Na Ase Tobe Ekla Cholo Re ("If no one responds to your call, then go your own way alone"[2]), commonly known as Ekla Chalo Re, is a Bengali patriotic song written by Rabindranath Tagore in 1905.[2] Originally titled as "Eka", the song was first published in the September 1905 issue of Bhandar magazine.[1] It was influenced by Harinaam Diye Jagat Matale Amar Ekla Nitai Re, a popular Bengali Kirtan song of Dhapkirtan[1] or Manoharshahi gharana[3] praising Nityananda, disciple of Chaitanya Mahaprabhu.[1] Ekla Chalo Re
Ekla Chalo Re
was incorporated in the "Swadesh" (Homeland) section of Tagore’s lyrical anthology Gitabitan.[1] The song exhorts the listener to continue his or her journey, despite abandonment or lack of support from others. The song is often quoted in the context of political or social change movements
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Jana Gana Mana
"Jana Gana Mana" (Bengali: [ɟənə gəɳə mənə]) is the national anthem of India. It is composed in Bengali by poet Rabindranath Tagore.[1][2] The National Anthem of India Jana-gana-mana, composed originally in Bengali by Rabindranath Tagore, was adopted in its Hindi
Hindi
version by the Constituent Assembly as the National Anthem of India
India
on 24 January 1950. [3] The first stanza of the song Bharot Bhagyo Bidhata
Bharot Bhagyo Bidhata
was adopted by the Constituent Assembly of India
India
as the National Anthem on 24 January 1950.[4] A formal rendition of the national anthem takes approximately fifty-two seconds
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Vocation (poem)
Vocation (Bengali: বিচিত্র সাধ) is a poem written by Rabindranath Tagore. It echoes a child's ever-changing dreams for the future, the search for a vocation.[1] Plot[edit] The poem describes a child's longing for the freedom he sees in the lives of those around him. When the gong sounds ten in the morning, he walks to his school and sees the hawker crying "Bangles, crystal bangles!" and he wishes he could be a hawker. At four in the afternoon, while coming back from school, he sees the gardener digging the ground and he wishes he were a gardener. When dusk falls his mother sends him to bed and he sees the watchman through the window and he wishes he could be a watchman.[2] References[edit]^ Macmillan Reference USA. USA: Macmillan. 1976. ISBN 978-0-02-865993-0.  ^ Daruwalla, Keki N. (2006). Poetry Magic. Ratna Sagar P.Ltd. pp. 40–41
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Valmiki-Pratibha
Vālmīki-Praṭibhā (Bengali: বাল্মীকি-প্রতিভা, Balmiki Protibha, lit. The Genius of Vālmīki) is an opera by Rabindranath Tagore
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The Post Office (play)
The Post Office (Bengali: Dak Ghar) is a 1912 play by Rabindranath Tagore. It concerns Amal, a child confined to his adopted uncle's home by an incurable disease. W. Andrew Robinson
W. Andrew Robinson
and Krishna Dutta note that the play "continues to occupy a special place in [Tagore's] reputation, both within Bengal
Bengal
and in the wider world."[1] It was written in four days.[2] Amal stands in Madhav's courtyard and talks to passers-by, and asks in particular about the places they go. The construction of a new post office nearby prompts the imaginative Amal to fantasize about receiving a letter from the King or being his postman. The village headman mocks Amal, and pretends the illiterate child has received a letter from the king promising that his royal physician will come to attend him
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Kabuliwala (short Story)
Kabuliwala is a Bengali short story written by Rabindranath Tagore
Rabindranath Tagore
in 1892. The story is of a Pashtun merchant from Kabul, who comes to Calcutta
Calcutta
(present day Kolkata), India
India
each year for selling dry-fruits and while living in India
India
he becomes friends with a five-year-old girl Mini from a middle-class aristocratic family as she reminds him of his daughter who lives in Kabul. Theme[edit] The main theme of this story is filial love-the deep love that fathers have for their children
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Chitra (play)
Chitra is a one-act play written by Rabindranath Tagore, first published in English in 1913 by the India Society of London.[1] The play adapts part of the story from the Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and centers upon the character of Chitrangada, a female warrior who tries to attract the attention of Arjuna. Chitra has been performed worldwide and has been adapted into several different formats, such as dance.[2]Contents1 Synopsis 2 Characters 3 Reception 4 References 5 External linksSynopsis[edit] The play adapts the story of Chitrāngadā
Chitrāngadā
and Arjuna
Arjuna
from the Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and begins with Chitra beginning a conversation with Madana, the god of love, and Vasanta, the god of springtime and eternal youth
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