HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Powhatan
The Powhatan
Powhatan
People (also spelled Powatan) are an Indigenous group traditionally from Virginia.[1] In some instances, The Powhatan, may refer to one of the leaders of the people. This is most commonly the case in historical writings by the English.[2] The Powhatans have also been known as Virginia
Virginia
Algonquians, as the Powhatan language
Powhatan language
is an eastern-Algonquian language also known as Virginia
Virginia
Algonquian. It is estimated that there were about 14,000–21,000 Powhatan
Powhatan
people in eastern Virginia
Virginia
when the English colonized Jamestown in 1607.[3] In the late 16th and early 17th centuries, a mamanatowick (paramount chief) named Wahunsunacawh created a powerful organization by affiliating 30 tributary peoples, whose territory was much of eastern Virginia
[...More...]

"Powhatan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Immunity (medical)
In biology, immunity is the balanced state of multicellular organisms having adequate biological defenses to fight infection, disease, or other unwanted biological invasion, while having adequate tolerance to avoid allergy, and autoimmune diseases.Contents1 Innate and adaptive 2 History of theories 3 Passive3.1 Naturally acquired 3.2 Artificially acquired 3.3 Transfer of activated T-cells4 Active4.1 Naturally acquired 4.2 Artificially acquired5 See also 6 References 7 External linksInnate and adaptive[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Scheme of a Fc receptorImmunity is the capability of multicellular organisms to resist harmful microorganisms from entering it. Immunity involves both specific and nonspecific components
[...More...]

"Immunity (medical)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Endemic
Endemism
Endemism
is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. The extreme opposite of endemism is cosmopolitan distribution. An alternative term for a species that is endemic is precinctive, which applies to species (and subspecific categories) that are restricted to a defined geographical area.Contents1 Etymology 2 Overview 3 Threats to highly endemistic regions 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The word endemic is from New Latin
New Latin
endēmicus, from Greek ενδήμος, endēmos, "native". Endēmos is formed of en meaning "in", and dēmos meaning "the people".[1] The term "precinctive" has been suggested by some scientists,[a] and was first used in botany by MacCaughey in 1917
[...More...]

"Endemic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Smallpox
Smallpox
Smallpox
was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.[7] The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977 and the World Health Organization certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.[10] The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among babies.[6][11] Often those who survive have extensive scarring of their skin and some are left blind.[6] The initial symptoms of the disease include fever and vomiting.[5] This is then followed by formation of sores in
[...More...]

"Smallpox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Measles
Measles
Measles
is a highly contagious infectious disease caused by the measles virus.[3][9] Symptoms usually develop 10–12 days after exposure to an infected person and last 7–10 days.[6][7] Initial symptoms typically include fever, often greater than 40 °C (104.0 °F), cough, runny nose, and inflamed eyes.[3][4] Small white spots known as Koplik's spots
[...More...]

"Measles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Infectious Diseases
Infection
Infection
is the invasion of an organism's body tissues by disease-causing agents, their multiplication, and the reaction of host tissues to the infectious agents and the toxins they produce.[1][2] Infectious disease, also known as transmissible disease or communicable disease, is illness resulting from an infection. Infections are caused by infectious agents including viruses, viroids, prions, bacteria, nematodes such as parasitic roundworms and pinworms, arthropods such as ticks, mites, fleas, and lice, fungi such as ringworm, and other macroparasites such as tapeworms and other helminths. Hosts can fight infections using their immune system
[...More...]

"Infectious Diseases" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Slavery
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
[...More...]

"Slavery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Africans
The population of Africa
Africa
has grown rapidly over the past century,[2] and consequently shows a large youth bulge, further reinforced by a low life expectancy of below 50 years in some African countries.[3] Total population as of 2017 is estimated at more than 1.25 billion, with a growth rate of more than 2.5% p.a.Contents1 Population growth 2 Health 3 Ethnicity 4 Major languages4.1 Central Africa 4.2 Horn of Africa 4.3 North Africa 4.4 Southeast Africa 4.5 Southern Africa 4.6 West Africa 4.7 Immigrants5 List of African countries by population 6 See also 7 Notes


[...More...]
"Africans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bacon's Rebellion
Bacon's Rebellion
Bacon's Rebellion
was an armed rebellion in 1676 by Virginia settlers led by Nathaniel Bacon against the rule of Governor William Berkeley. The colony's dismissive policy as it related to the political challenges of its western frontier, along with other challenges including leaving Bacon out of his inner circle, refusing to allow Bacon to be a part of his fur trade with the Indians, and Doeg American Indian attacks, helped to motivate a popular uprising against Berkeley, who had failed to address the demands of the colonists regarding their safety. A thousand Virginians of all classes and races rose up in arms against Berkeley, attacking Indians, chasing Berkeley from Jamestown, Virginia, and ultimately torching the capital
[...More...]

"Bacon's Rebellion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

House Of Burgesses
The Virginia
Virginia
House of Burgesses
House of Burgesses
/ˈbɜːrdʒəsɪz/ was the first legislative assembly of elected representatives in North America.[1] The House was established by the Virginia
Virginia
Company, which created the body as part of an effort to encourage English craftsmen to settle in North America, and to make conditions in the colony more agreeable for its current inhabitants.[2] From 1619 to 1776, the representative branch of the legislature of Virginia
Virginia
was the House of Burgesses, which governed in conjunction with a colonial governor and his council. Jamestown remained the capital of the Virginia
Virginia
colony until 1699, when the government was moved to Williamsburg
[...More...]

"House Of Burgesses" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

English People
The English are a nation and an ethnic group native to England
England
who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English
Old English
as the Angelcynn ("family of the Angles"). Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
who migrated to Great Britain
Great Britain
around the 5th century AD.[7] England
England
is one of the countries of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living there are British citizens. Historically, the English population is descended from several peoples — the earlier Celtic Britons (or Brythons) and the Germanic tribes that settled in Britain following the withdrawal of the Romans, including Angles, Saxons, Jutes
Jutes
and Frisians
[...More...]

"English People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Head Of Navigation
Head of navigation is the farthest point above the mouth of a river that can be navigated by ships. Determining the head of navigation can be subjective on many streams, as this point may vary greatly with the size of the ship being contemplated for navigation and the seasonal water level. On others, it is quite objective, being caused by a waterfall or a dam without navigation locks. Several rivers in a region may have their heads of navigation along a line called the Fall line.This article related to water transport is a stub
[...More...]

"Head Of Navigation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

James I Of England
James VI and I
James VI and I
(James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland
King of Scotland
as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother was compelled to abdicate in his favour
[...More...]

"James I Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
[...More...]

"Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Columbia, Virginia
Columbia, formerly known as Point of Fork, is an unincorporated community in Fluvanna County, Virginia, United States, at the confluence of the James and Rivanna rivers. Following a referendum, Columbia was dissolved as an incorporated town – until that time the smallest in Virginia
Virginia
– on July 1, 2016.[4] As of the 2010 census, the town's population was 83,[5] up from 49 at the 2000 census. Columbia is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 History1.1 Shrine of St. Katharine Drexel2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics3.1 2000 census 3.2 2010 census4 ReferencesHistory[edit] In pre-colonial times, the site served as the location of a major Monacan village
[...More...]

"Columbia, Virginia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anne, Queen Of Great Britain
Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714)[a] was the Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland between 8 March 1702 and 1 May 1707. On 1 May 1707, under the Acts of Union, two of her realms, the kingdoms of England
England
and Scotland, united as a single sovereign state known as Great Britain. She continued to reign as Queen of Great Britain and Ireland until her death. Anne was born in the reign of her uncle Charles II, who had no legitimate children. Her father, Charles's younger brother James, was thus heir presumptive to the throne. His suspected Roman Catholicism was unpopular in England, and on Charles's instructions Anne and her elder sister, Mary, were raised as Anglicans. Three years after he succeeded Charles upon the latter's death, James was deposed in the Glorious Revolution
Glorious Revolution
of 1688
[...More...]

"Anne, Queen Of Great Britain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.