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Pot Cheese
Pot cheese is a type of soft, crumbly, unaged cheese. It is very simple to make and also highly versatile, making it a very popular cheese, but it may be hard to find in stores. Pot cheese is in the midway stage between cottage cheese and farmer cheese. It is somewhat dry and crumbly, but with a neutral, creamy texture and is very high in protein. It is most similar to cream cheese, ricotta, and the Mexican queso blanco. In New York and its environs, it was frequently served in a bowl topped with cut-up vegetables. In Austria, Topfen (pot cheese) is another name for Quark. It is traditionally cut with a sun-shaped object known as a cheese cutter.This cheese-related article is a stub
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Fresh Cheese
Types of cheese
Types of cheese
are grouped or classified according to criteria such as length of fermentating, texture, methods of making, fat content, animal milk, country or region of origin, etc. The method most commonly and traditionally used is based on moisture content, which is then further narrowed down by fat content and curing or ripening methods.[1][2] The criteria may either be used singly or in combination,[3] with no single method being universally used.[4] The combination of types produces around 50 different varieties recognized by the International Dairy Federation,[1] over 400 identified by Walter and Hargrove, over 500 by Burkhalter, and over 1,000 by Sandine and Elliker.[5] Some attempts have been made to rationalise the classification of cheese; a scheme was proposed by Pieter Walstra that uses the primary and secondary starter combined with moisture content, and Walter and Hargrove suggested classifying by production methods
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Cream Cheese
Cream
Cream
cheese is a soft, mild-tasting fresh cheese made from milk and cream.[1][2] Stabilizers such as carob bean gum and carrageenan are typically added in industrial production.[3] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Food and Drug Administration
defines cream cheese as containing at least 33% milk fat with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9.[4] Similarly, under Canadian Food and Drug Regulations cream cheese must contain at least 30% milk fat and a maximum of 55% moisture.[5] In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content.[6] Cream
Cream
cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie
Brie
and Neufchâtel
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Ricotta
Ricotta
Ricotta
(pronounced [riˈkɔtta] in Italian) is an Italian whey cheese made from sheep, cow, goat, or Italian water buffalo
Italian water buffalo
milk whey left over from the production of cheese. Like other whey cheeses, it is made by coagulating the proteins that remain after the casein has been used to make cheese, notably albumin and globulin. Ricotta
Ricotta
(literally meaning "recooked") protein can be harvested if the whey is first allowed to become more acidic by additional fermentation (by letting it sit for 12–24 hours at room temperature). Then the acidified whey is heated to near boiling. The combination of low pH and high temperature denatures the protein and causes it to precipitate, forming a fine curd
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Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicis
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Cheese
Cheese
Cheese
is a dairy product derived from milk that is produced in a wide range of flavors, textures, and forms by coagulation of the milk protein casein. It comprises proteins and fat from milk, usually the milk of cows, buffalo, goats, or sheep. During production, the milk is usually acidified, and adding the enzyme rennet causes coagulation. The solids are separated and pressed into final form.[1] Some cheeses have molds on the rind, the outer layer, or throughout. Most cheeses melt at cooking temperature. Hundreds of types of cheese from various countries are produced. Their styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal's diet), whether they have been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the bacteria and mold, the processing, and aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses, such as Red Leicester, is produced by adding annatto
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Cottage Cheese
Cottage cheese
Cottage cheese
is a fresh cheese curd product with a mild flavor.Contents1 Origin 2 Manufacture 3 Curd
Curd
size 4 Consumption 5 Nutrition 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOrigin[edit] The first known use of the term "cottage cheese" dates back to 1831.[1] It is believed to have originated because the simple cheese was usually made in cottages from any milk left over after making butter.[citation needed] Manufacture[edit] Cottage cheese
Cottage cheese
is drained, but not pressed, so some whey remains and the individual curds remain loose. The curd is usually washed to remove acidity, giving sweet-curd cheese. It is not aged or colored. Different styles of cottage cheese are made from milk with different fat levels and in small-curd or large-curd preparations
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Farmer Cheese
In the United States, farmer cheese (also farmer's cheese or farmers' cheese) is pressed cottage cheese, an unripened cheese made by adding rennet and bacterial starter to coagulate and acidify milk. Farmer cheese may be made from the milk of cows, sheep or goats, with each giving its own texture and flavor. During coagulation the mixture separates into curds (solid) and whey (liquid), then the whey is drained off. Further pressing out of the moisture yields the malleable solid results of pot cheese, while even more pressing makes farmer cheese, which is solid, dry and crumbly. Farmer cheese
Farmer cheese
is often used for fillings in blintzes, pierogi and other foods
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Queso Blanco
Queso blanco
Queso blanco
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkeso ˈβlaŋko]), with similar cheeses including queso fresco (pronounced [ˈkeso ˈfɾesko]), is a creamy, soft, and mild unaged white cheese, commonly used in the Iberian Peninsula, several Latin American countries including Mexico, and many parts of the United States. The name queso blanco is Spanish for "white cheese", but similar cheeses are used and known throughout the world. In Brazil
Brazil
they are respectively known as queijo branco (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈkejʒu ˈbɾɐ̃ku]) and queijo fresco in Portugal
Portugal
([ˈkeijʒu ˈfɾeʃku]). It is similar to (if slightly more acidic than) pot cheese and farmer cheese
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Quark (cheese)
Quark
Quark
or quarg is a type of fresh dairy product made by warming soured milk until the desired amount of curdling is met, and then straining it. It can be classified as fresh acid-set cheese. Traditional quark can be made without rennet, but in modern dairies small quantities of rennet are typically added. It is soft, white and unaged, and usually has no salt added. It is common in the cuisines of German-speaking countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg), northern Europe (Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Sweden), the Netherlands,[1][2][3] Hungary, Belgium, Albania, Israel, Romania, of Slavic peoples
Slavic peoples
(e.g
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Pot Cheese
Pot cheese is a type of soft, crumbly, unaged cheese. It is very simple to make and also highly versatile, making it a very popular cheese, but it may be hard to find in stores. Pot cheese is in the midway stage between cottage cheese and farmer cheese. It is somewhat dry and crumbly, but with a neutral, creamy texture and is very high in protein. It is most similar to cream cheese, ricotta, and the Mexican queso blanco. In New York and its environs, it was frequently served in a bowl topped with cut-up vegetables. In Austria, Topfen (pot cheese) is another name for Quark. It is traditionally cut with a sun-shaped object known as a cheese cutter.This cheese-related article is a stub
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