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Port
A port is a maritime commercial facility which may comprise one or more wharves where ships may dock to load and discharge passengers and cargo
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Battle Of Salamis
The Battle of Salamis
Battle of Salamis
(/ˈsæləmɪs/; Ancient Greek: Ναυμαχία τῆς Σαλαμῖνος, Naumachia tēs Salaminos) was a naval battle fought between an alliance of Greek city-states under Themistocles
Themistocles
and the Persian Empire under King Xerxes
King Xerxes
in 480 BC which resulted in a decisive victory for the outnumbered Greeks. The battle was fought in the straits between the mainland and Salamis, an island in the Saronic Gulf
Saronic Gulf
near Athens, and marked the high-point of the second Persian invasion of Greece. To block the Persian advance, a small force of Greeks blocked the pass of Thermopylae, while an Athenian-dominated Allied navy engaged the Persian fleet in the nearby straits of Artemisium
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Hilo
Hilo (/ˈhiːloʊ/) is the largest settlement and census-designated place (CDP) in Hawaii
Hawaii
County, Hawaii, United States, which encompasses the Island of Hawaiʻi. The population was 43,263 at the 2010 census.[1] Hilo is the county seat of the County of Hawaiʻi and is located in the District
District
of South Hilo.[2] The town overlooks Hilo Bay, at the base of two shield volcanoes; Mauna Loa, an active volcano, and Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano and the site of some of the world's most important ground-based astronomical observatories. Much of the city is at some risk from lava flows from Mauna Loa
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Claude Lorrain
Claude Lorrain
Claude Lorrain
(French: [klod lɔ.ʁɛ̃]; born Claude Gellée [ʒəle], called le Lorrain in French; traditionally just Claude in English; c. 1600 – 23 November 1682) was a French painter, draughtsman and engraver of the Baroque
Baroque
era. He spent most of his life in Italy, and is one of the earliest important artists, apart from his contemporaries in Dutch Golden Age painting, to concentrate on landscape painting. His landscapes are usually turned into the more prestigious genre of history paintings by the addition of a few small figures, typically representing a scene from the bible or classical mythology. By the end of the 1630s he was established as the leading landscapist in Italy, and enjoyed large fees for his work
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East River
The East River
River
is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City. The waterway, which is actually not a river despite its name, connects Upper New York Bay
Upper New York Bay
on its south end to Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
on its north end. It separates the borough of Queens
Queens
on Long Island
Long Island
from the Bronx on the North American mainland, and also divides Manhattan
Manhattan
from Queens and Brooklyn, which is also on Long Island.[1] Because of its connection to Long Island
Long Island
Sound, it was once also known as the Sound River.[2] The tidal strait changes its direction of flow frequently, and is subject to strong fluctuations in its current, which are accentuated by its narrowness and variety of depths
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Wadi Al-Jarf
Wadi al-Jarf
Wadi al-Jarf
(Arabic: وادي الجرف‎) is the present name for an area on the Red Sea
Red Sea
coast of Egypt, 119 km (74 mi) south of Suez, that is the site of the oldest known artificial harbour in the world. It is located at the mouth of the Wadi Araba, a major communication corridor between the Nile Valley and the Red Sea, crossing the Eastern Desert. The site is also right across the Gulf of Suez
Suez
from the small Sinai fortress of Tell Ras Budran. A somewhat similar ancient port is at Ain Sukhna, a little north of Wadi al-Jarf. The site was first discovered by J. G. Wilkinson
J. G. Wilkinson
in 1832. It was rediscovered by a French team in the 1950s, who named it Rod el-Khawaga, but archeological work was quickly abandoned when the Suez Crisis broke out in 1956
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Affreightment
Affreightment (from freight) is a legal term used in shipping. A contract of affreightment is a contract between a ship-owner and another person (called the charterer), in which the ship-owner agrees to carry goods for the charterer in the ship, or to give the charterer the use of the whole or part of the ship's cargo-carrying space for the carriage of goods on a specified voyage or voyages or for a specified time. The charterer agrees to pay a specified price, called freight, for the carriage of the goods or the use of the ship.[1] A ship may be let, like a house, to a person who takes possession and control of it for a specified term. The person who hires a ship in this way occupies during the specified time the position of ship-owner
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Canopus, Egypt
Canopus, also known as Canobus[1] (Coptic: ⲕⲁⲛⲱⲡⲟⲥ), was an Ancient Egyptian coastal town, located in the Nile Delta. Its site is in the eastern outskirts of modern-day Alexandria, around 25 kilometers (16 mi) from the center of that city. Canopus was located on the western bank at the mouth of the westernmost branch of the Delta – known as the Canopic or Heracleotic branch. It belonged to the seventh Egyptian Nome, known as Menelaites, and later as Canopites, after it. It was the principal port in Egypt for Greek trade before the foundation of Alexandria, along with Naucratis and Heracleion. Its ruins lie near the present Egyptian village of Abu Qir
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Qin Dynasty
Huang-LaoHuangdi Sijing HuainanziEarly figuresGuan Zhong Zichan Deng Xi Li Kui Wu QiFounding figuresShen Buhai Duke Xiao of Qin Shang Yang Shen Dao Zhang Yi Xun Kuang Han Fei Li Si Qin Shi HuangHan figuresJia Yi Liu An Emperor Wen of Han Emperor Wu of Han Chao Cuo Gongsun Hong Zhang Tang Huan Tan Wang Fu Zhuge LiangLater figuresEmperor Wen of Sui Du You Wang Anshi Li Shanchang Zhang Juzheng Xu Guangqiv t eHistory of ChinaANCIENTNeolithic c. 8500 – c. 2070 BC Xia dynasty
Xia dynasty
c. 2070 – c. 1600 BC Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
c. 1600 – c. 1046 BC Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
c
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Maritime Law
Admiralty
Admiralty
law or maritime law is a body of law that governs nautical issues and private maritime disputes. Admiralty
Admiralty
law consists of both domestic law on maritime activities, and private international law governing the relationships between private parties operating or using ocean-going ships. While each legal jurisdiction usually has its own legislation governing maritime matters, the international nature of the topic and the need for uniformity has, since 1900, led to considerable international maritime law developments, including numerous multilateral treaties.[1] Matters dealt by admiralty law include marine commerce, marine navigation, salvage, maritime pollution, seafarers’ rights, and the carriage by sea of both passengers and goods. Admiralty
Admiralty
law also covers land-based commercial activities that are maritime in character, such as marine insurance
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Korea
Korea
Korea
(/kəˈriːə/) is a historical region in East Asia; since 1945, it has been divided into two distinct sovereign states: North Korea (officially the "Democratic People's Republic of Korea") and South Korea
Korea
(officially the "Republic of Korea"). Located on the Korean Peninsula, Korea
Korea
is bordered by China
China
to the northwest and Russia
Russia
to the northeast. It is separated from Japan
Japan
to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan
Japan
(East Sea). Korea
Korea
emerged as a singular political entity in 676 AD, after centuries of conflict among the Three Kingdoms of Korea, which were unified as Unified Silla
Unified Silla
to the south and Balhae
Balhae
to the north
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Ostia Antica
Ostia Antica
Ostia Antica
is a large archeological site, close to the modern suburb of Ostia, that is the location of the harbour city of ancient Rome, 15 miles (25 kilometers) southwest of Rome. "Ostia" (plur. of "ostium") is a derivation of "os", the Latin word for "mouth". At the mouth of the River Tiber, Ostia was Rome's seaport, but due to silting the site now lies 3 kilometres (2 miles) from the sea.[2] The site is noted for the excellent preservation of its ancient buildings, magnificent frescoes and impressive mosaics.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Civil wars 1.3 Sacking by pirates 1.4 Imperial Ostia 1.5 Late-Roman and sub-Roman Ostia 1.6 Sacking and excavation2 Modern day 3 Media 4 Gallery 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]The old entrance of the cityOrigins[edit] Ostia may have been Rome's first colonia
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Lothal
Lothal
Lothal
(IPA: [loˑt̪ʰəl]) is one of the southernmost cities of the ancient Indus valley civilization,[1] located in the Bhāl region of the modern state of Gujarāt and first inhabited c. 3700 BCE.[2] Discovered in 1954, Lothal
Lothal
was excavated from 13 February 1955 to 19 May 1960 by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), the official Indian government agency for the preservation of ancient monuments. According to the ASI, Lothal
Lothal
had the world's earliest known dock, which connected the city to an ancient course of the Sabarmati
Sabarmati
river on the trade route between Harappan cities in Sindh
Sindh
and the peninsula of Saurashtra when the surrounding Kutch desert of today was a part of the Arabian Sea
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Canal
Canals, or navigations, are human-made channels, or artificial waterways, for water conveyance, or to service water transport vehicles. In most cases, the engineered works will have a series of dams and locks that create reservoirs of low speed current flow. These reservoirs are referred to as slack water levels, often just called levels. A canal is also known as a navigation when it parallels a river and shares part of its waters and drainage basin, and leverages its resources by building dams and locks to increase and lengthen its stretches of slack water levels while staying in its valley. In contrast, a canal cuts across a drainage divide atop a ridge, generally requiring an external water source above the highest elevation. Many canals have been built at elevations towering over valleys and other water ways crossing far below. Canals with sources of water at a higher level can deliver water to a destination such as a city where water is needed
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Trajan
Trajan
Trajan
(/ˈtreɪdʒən/; Latin: Imperator Caesar Nerva
Nerva
Trajanus Divi Nervae filius Augustus;[1][2] 18 September 53 – 8 August 117 AD) was Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from 98 to 117 AD. Officially declared by the Senate optimus princeps ("the best ruler"), Trajan
Trajan
is remembered as a successful soldier-emperor who presided over the greatest military expansion in Roman history, leading the empire to attain its maximum territorial extent by the time of his death
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