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Popular Electronics
Popular Electronics
Popular Electronics
is an American magazine published by John August Media, LLC, and hosted at TechnicaCuriosa.com. The magazine was started by Ziff-Davis
Ziff-Davis
Publishing Company in October 1954 for electronics hobbyists and experimenters. It soon became the "World's Largest-Selling Electronics Magazine". In April 1957 Ziff-Davis reported an average net paid circulation of 240,151 copies.[1] Popular Electronics was published until October 1982 when, in November 1982, Ziff-Davis
Ziff-Davis
launched a successor magazine, Computers & Electronics. During its last year of publication by Ziff-Davis, Popular Electronics reported an average monthly circulation of 409,344 copies.[2] The title was sold to Gernsback Publications, and their Hands-On Electronics magazine was renamed to Popular Electronics
Popular Electronics
in February 1989, and published until December 1999
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Texas State University–San Marcos
Texas
Texas
State University is a public research university located in San Marcos, Texas, United States. Established in 1899 as the Southwest Texas
Texas
State Normal School, it opened in 1903 to 303 students. Since that time it has grown into the largest institution in the Texas
Texas
State University System and the fifth-largest university in the state of Texas
Texas
with an enrollment of over 38,000 students for the 2017 fall semester.[4] It has 10 colleges and about 50 schools and departments. Texas
Texas
State is classified as a research university with higher research activity by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching[5] and an emerging research university by the State of Texas.[6] The university is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)
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Cuban Missile Crisis
The Cuban Missile Crisis, also known as the October Crisis of 1962 (Spanish: Crisis de Octubre), the Caribbean Crisis (Russian: Карибский кризис, tr. Karibsky krizis, IPA: [kɐˈrʲipskʲɪj ˈkrʲizʲɪs]), or the Missile Scare, was a 13-day (October 16–28 1962) confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
concerning American ballistic missile deployment in Italy
Italy
and Turkey
Turkey
with consequent Soviet ballistic missile deployment in Cuba
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Light-emitting Diode
A light-emitting diode (LED) is a two-lead semiconductor light source. It is a p–n junction diode that emits light when activated.[5] When a suitable current is applied to the leads,[6][7] electrons are able to recombine with electron holes within the device, releasing energy in the form of photons. This effect is called electroluminescence, and the color of the light (corresponding to the energy of the photon) is determined by the energy band gap of the semiconductor. LEDs
LEDs
are typically small (less than 1 mm2) and integrated optical components may be used to shape the radiation pattern.[8] Appearing as practical electronic components in 1962, the earliest LEDs
LEDs
emitted low-intensity infrared light.[9] Infrared
Infrared
LEDs
LEDs
are still frequently used as transmitting elements in remote-control circuits, such as those in remote controls for a wide variety of consumer electronics
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Intel 8008
The Intel
Intel
8008 ("eight-thousand-eight" or "eighty-oh-eight") is an early byte-oriented microprocessor designed and manufactured by Intel and introduced in April 1972. It is an 8-bit CPU with an external 1 4-bit
4-bit
address bus that could address 16 KB of memory. Originally known as the 1201, the chip was commissioned by Computer
Computer
Terminal Corporation (CTC) to implement an instruction set of their design for their Datapoint 2200
Datapoint 2200
programmable terminal. As the chip was delayed and did not meet CTC's performance goals, the 2200 ended up using CTC's own TTL-based CPU instead
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San Antonio Express-News
The San Antonio
San Antonio
Express-News is a daily newspaper in San Antonio, Texas. It is owned by the Hearst Corporation
Hearst Corporation
and has offices in Austin, the Rio Grande Valley and Washington, D.C. The Express-News is the fourth largest newspaper in the state of Texas, with a daily circulation of nearly 100,000 copies in 2016.[3]Contents1 History 2 Current business 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory[edit] The paper was first published in 1865 as a weekly tabloid-style newspaper under the name The San Antonio
San Antonio
Express. At that time, the city had already had a number of other newspapers in a number of different languages. However, all the other publications went out of business, leaving only the Express to serve the city. In December 1866, the Express made the move from a weekly paper to a daily newspaper, and expanded into a full newspaper by the early 1870s
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Printed Circuit Board
A printed circuit board (PCB) mechanically supports and electrically connects electronic components or electrical components using conductive tracks, pads and other features etched from one or more sheet layers of copper laminated onto and/or between sheet layers of a non-conductive substrate. Components are generally soldered onto the PCB to both electrically connect and mechanically fasten them to it. Printed circuit boards are used in all but the simplest electronic products. They are also used in some electrical products, such as passive switch boxes. Alternatives to PCBs include wire wrap and point-to-point construction, both once popular but now rarely used. PCBs require additional design effort to lay out the circuit, but manufacturing and assembly can be automated. Specialized CAD software is available to do much of the work of layout. Mass-producing circuits with PCBs is cheaper and faster than with other wiring methods, as components are mounted and wired in one operation
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Silicon-controlled Rectifier
A silicon controlled rectifier or semiconductor-controlled rectifier is a four-layer solid-state current-controlling device. The principle of four layer p-n-p-n switching was developed by Moll, Tanenbaum, Goldey and Holonyak of Bell Laboratories in 1956.[1] The practical demonstration of silicon controlled switching and detailed theoretical behavior of a device in agreement with the experimental results was presented by Dr Ian M. Mackintosh of Bell Laboratories in January 1958.[2][3] The name "silicon controlled rectifier" is General Electric's trade name for a type of thyristor. The SCR was developed by a team of power engineers led by Gordon Hall[4] and commercialized by Frank W
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Psychedelia
Psychedelic filmAcid Western Stoner filmPsychedelic literatureCultureCounterculture Entheogen Smart shop Trip sitter Psychedelic microdosingDrugs25I-NBOMe 2C-B Ayahuasca Cannabis DMT Ibogaine Ketamine LSD Mescaline Peyote Psilocybin
Psilocybin
mushrooms Salvinorin A/Salvia San Pedro cactusList of psychedelic drugs List of psilocybin mushrooms Psychoactive cactusExperienceBad trip Ecology Ego death Serotonergic psychedelic TherapyHistoryAcid Tests Albert Hofmann History of lysergic acid diethylamide Owsley Stanley Psychedelic era Summer of
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Arizona State University
Arizona
Arizona
State University
University
(commonly referred to as ASU or Arizona State) is a public metropolitan research university[9] on five campuses across the Phoenix metropolitan area,[10][11] and four regional learning centers throughout Arizona. The 2018 university ratings by U.S. News & World Report rank ASU No. 1 among the Most Innovative Schools in America for the third year in a row[12] and has ranked ASU No. 115 in National Universities with overall score of 47/100 with 83% of student applications accepted.[13] ASU is one of the largest public universities by enrollment in the U.S.[14] It had approximately 72,000 students enrolled in fall 2017, including 59,198 undergraduate and 12,630 graduate students.[15] ASU's charter, approved by the board of regents in 2014, is based on the "New American University" model created by ASU President Crow
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Lafayette College
Lafayette College
College
is a private liberal arts college based in Easton, Pennsylvania, with a campus in New York City, NY.[7] The school, founded in 1826 by James Madison Porter, son of General Andrew Porter of Norristown, and the citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832.[8] The founders voted to name the school after General Lafayette, who famously toured the country in 1824–25, as "a testimony of respect for [his] talents, virtues, and signal services... in the great cause of freedom".[8] Lafayette is considered a Hidden Ivy[9] as well as one of the northeastern Little Ivies.[10] Located on College
College
Hill in Easton, the campus is in the Lehigh Valley, about 70 mi (110 km) west of New York City
New York City
and 60 mi (97 km) north of Philadelphia
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Southwest Research Institute
Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, is one of the oldest and largest independent, nonprofit, applied research and development (R&D) organizations in the United States. Founded in 1947 by oil businessman Thomas Slick, Jr., SwRI provides contract research and development services to government and industrial clients. The institute consists of nine technical divisions that offer multidisciplinary, problem-solving services in a variety of areas in engineering and the physical sciences. The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, also operates on the SwRI grounds. More than 4,000 projects are active at the institute at any given time. These projects are funded almost equally between the government and commercial sectors
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Intel 8080
The Intel
Intel
8080 ("eighty-eighty") was the second 8-bit microprocessor designed and manufactured by Intel
Intel
and was released in April 1974.[1] It is an extended and enhanced variant of the earlier 8008 design, although without binary compatibility. The initial specified clock frequency limit was 2 MHz, and with common instructions using 4, 5, 7, 10, or 11 cycles this meant that it operated at a typical speed of a few hundred thousand instructions per second
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Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
is a classic magazine of popular science and technology. Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
was first published by Henry Haven Windsor, January 11, 1902. It has been owned since 1958 by Hearst Communications. There are nine[3] international editions, including a now-defunct Latin American version that had been published for decades, and a newer South African edition. The Russian edition of Popular Mechanics has been issued since 2002
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Amateur Radio
Amateur radio
Amateur radio
(also called ham radio) describes the use of radio frequency spectrum for purposes of non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, private recreation, radiosport, contesting, and emergency communication. The term "amateur" is used to specify "a duly authorised person interested in radioelectric practice with a purely personal aim and without pecuniary interest;"[1] (either direct monetary or other similar reward) and to differentiate it from commercial broadcasting, public safety (such as police and fire), or professional two-way radio services (such as maritime, aviation, taxis, etc.). The amateur radio service (amateur service and amateur-satellite service) is established by the International Telecommunication
Telecommunication
Union (ITU) through the Radio Regulations
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Citizens' Band Radio
Citizens band radio
Citizens band radio
(also known as CB radio) is, in many countries, a system of short-distance radio communications between individuals typically on a selection of 40 channels within the 27 MHz (11 m) band. Citizens band is distinct from other personal radio service allocations such as FRS, GMRS, MURS, UHF CB and the Amateur Radio Service ("ham" radio). In many countries, CB operation does not require a license, and (unlike amateur radio) it may be used for business or personal communications. Like many other two-way radio services, citizens band channels are shared by many users. Only one station may transmit at a time; other stations must listen and wait for the shared channel to be available
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