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Pope Victor II
Pope
Pope
Victor II (c. 1018 – 28 July 1057), born Gebhard, Count of Calw, Tollenstein, and Hirschberg (de), was Pope
Pope
from 13 April 1055 until his death in 1057.[1] He was one of a series of German reform popes. Life[edit] He was born Gebhard of Calw, a son of the Swabian Count Hartwig of Calw
Calw
and a kinsman of Emperor Henry III. At the suggestion of his uncle, Gebhard, Bishop of Ratisbon, the 24-year-old Gebhard was appointed Bishop of Eichstätt. In this position, he supported the Emperor's interests and eventually became one of his closest advisors.[2] After the death of Pope
Pope
Leo IX, a Roman delegation headed by Hildebrand, later Pope
Pope
Gregory VII, travelled to Mainz and asked the Emperor to nominate Gebhard as successor
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Victor II, Prince Of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym
Victor II Karl Frederick of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (Schaumburg, 2 November 1767 – Schaumburg, 22 April 1812), was a German prince of the House of Ascania
House of Ascania
from the Anhalt-Bernburg
Anhalt-Bernburg
branch and a ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym. He was the eldest son of Karl Louis, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym, by his second wife Amalie Eleonore, daughter of Frederick William, Prince of Solms-Braunfels.Contents1 Life 2 Marriage and issue 3 References 4 BibliographyLife[edit] Victor Karl Frederick succeeded his father in Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym upon his death in 1806. During most of his reign he was in conflict with his half-uncle Frederick over the government of the principality
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Salian Dynasty
The Salian dynasty
Salian dynasty
(German: Salier; also known as the Frankish dynasty after the family's origin and position as dukes of Franconia) was a dynasty in the High Middle Ages. The dynasty provided four German Kings (1024–1125), all of whom went on to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor (1027–1125); as such, the term Salic dynasty is also used to refer to the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
of the time as a separate term. After the death of the last Saxon of the Ottonian Dynasty
Dynasty
in 1024, the elective titles of King of the Germans
King of the Germans
and then three years later Holy Roman Emperor both passed to the first monarch of the Salian dynasty in the person of Conrad II, the only son of Count Henry of Speyer
Henry of Speyer
and Adelheid of Alsace (both territories in the Franconia of the day)
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Ermesinde Of Carcassonne
Ermesinde of Carcassonne
Carcassonne
(ca. 972 – March 1, 1058) was Countess consort of Barcelona, Girona and Osona. She served as regent in these counties during the minority of her son from 1018 until 1023. Ermesinde of Carcassonne
Carcassonne
was the daughter of Roger I of Carcassonne. She married Ramon Borrell, Count of Barcelona. While he lived she was politically active and presided over assemblies and tribunals. After his death in 1018 she became regent for her son Berenguer Ramon I until 1023. After this, she continued to wield power. In contrast to her son, she favored war with the Muslim powers to the South, partly because of the discontent of the nobles at his policy of peace
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Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
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Simony
Simony
Simony
/ˈsɪməni/ is the act of selling church offices and roles. It is named after Simon Magus,[1] who is described in the Acts of the Apostles 8:9–24 as having offered two disciples of Jesus, Peter and John, payment in exchange for their empowering him to impart the power of the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
to anyone on whom he would place his hands
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Victor II, Duke Of Ratibor
Victor II, Duke
Duke
of Ratibor, Prince of Corvey, Prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (German: Viktor Amadeus 2.Herzog von Ratibor, 2.Fürst von Corvey, Prinz zu Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst; 6 September 1847 – 9 August 1923) was a member of House of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst and Duke
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Harz
The Harz
Harz
is a Mittelgebirge
Mittelgebirge
that has the highest elevations in Northern Germany
Germany
and its rugged terrain extends across parts of Lower Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, and Thuringia. The name Harz
Harz
derives from the Middle High German
Middle High German
word Hardt or Hart (hill forest), Latinized as Hercynia. The Brocken
Brocken
is the highest summit in the Harz
Harz
with an elevation of 1,141.1 metres (3,744 ft) above sea level
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Henry II Of Augsburg
Henry II (origin and ancestry unknown; died 3 September 1063) was Bishop of Augsburg
Augsburg
from 1047 to 1063. Prior to his episcopal tenure Henry II was a member of the Hofkapelle[1] of Emperor Henry III and, from 1046 to 1047, the head of the Italian chancellery, in which documents that concerned the Italian lands of the Empire were prepared. His career is thus typical of the Ottonian- Salian
Salian
imperial church
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Ravenna
Ravenna
Ravenna
(Italian pronunciation: [raˈvenna], also locally [raˈvɛnna] ( listen); Romagnol: Ravèna) is the capital city of the Province of Ravenna, in the Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
region of Northern Italy. It was the capital city of the Western Roman Empire from 402 until that empire collapsed in 476. It then served as the capital of the Ostrogothic Kingdom
Ostrogothic Kingdom
until it was re-conquered in 540 by the Byzantine Empire. Afterwards, the city formed the centre of the Byzantine Exarchate of Ravenna
Exarchate of Ravenna
until the invasion of the Lombards
Lombards
in 751, after which it became the seat of the Kingdom of the Lombards. Although an inland city, Ravenna
Ravenna
is connected to the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
by the Candiano Canal
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Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
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Mausoleum Of Theodoric
The Mausoleum
Mausoleum
of Theoderic (Italian: Mausoleo di Teodorico) is an ancient monument just outside Ravenna, Italy. It was built in 520 AD by Theoderic the Great
Theoderic the Great
as his future tomb.Contents1 Description 2 References 3 See also 4 Further reading 5 External linksDescription[edit] The current structure of the mausoleum is divided into two decagonal orders, one above the other; both are made of Istria
Istria
stone. Its roof is a single 300–ton Istrian stone, 10 meters in diameter. A niche leads down to a room that was probably a chapel for funeral liturgies; a stair leads to the upper floor. Located in the centre of the floor is a circular porphyry stone grave, in which Theoderic was buried. His remains were removed during Byzantine rule, when the mausoleum was turned into a Christian
Christian
oratory
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Theodoric The Great
Theoderic the Great
Theoderic the Great
(Gothic: *𐌸𐌹𐌿𐌳𐌰𐍂𐌴𐌹𐌺𐍃; *Þiudareiks; Latin: Flāvius Theodericus; Greek: Θευδέριχος, Theuderikhos; Old English: Þēodrīc; Old Norse: Þjōðrēkr; German: Theoderich; 454 – August 30, 526 AD), often referred to as Theodoric, was king of the Ostrogoths
Ostrogoths
(475–526),[1] ruler of Italy
Italy
(493–526), regent of the Visigoths
Visigoths
(511–526), and a patricius of the Roman Empire. His Gothic name, which is reconstructed by linguists as *Þiudareiks, translates into "people-king" or "ruler of the people".[2] Theodoric was born in Pannonia
Pannonia
in 454, after his people had defeated the Huns
Huns
at the Battle of Nedao. His father was King Theodemir, a Germanic Amali nobleman, and his mother was Ereleuva
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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