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Pope's Eye
Pope's Eye
Pope's Eye
is the uncompleted foundation for an island fort intended to defend the entrance to Port Phillip
Port Phillip
in the state of Victoria, Australia. The undefined area of the fort, generally assessed at 4 hectares (9.9 acres), is one of six separate areas that comprise the Port Phillip
Port Phillip
Heads Marine National Park and is a popular site for divers.[2]Contents1 Features1.1 Flora and fauna2 See also 3 ReferencesFeatures[edit] The fort has been protected as a marine reserve since 1979 and is now part of the Port Phillip
Port Phillip
Heads Marine National Park. It is located about 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) inside Port Phillip
Port Phillip
Heads, 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) east of Queenscliff, 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north of Portsea, and is less than 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) south-west of the former Chinaman's Hat
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Corner Inlet Marine National Park
The Corner Inlet Marine National Park is a protected marine national park located in the South Gippsland
South Gippsland
region of Victoria, Australia.[1][2] The 1,550-hectare (3,800-acre) marine park is situated approximately 200 kilometres (120 mi) southeast of
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Brown Fur Seal
The brown fur seal ( Arctocephalus
Arctocephalus
pusillus), also known as the Cape fur seal, South African fur seal and the Australian fur seal is a species of fur seal.Contents1 Description 2 Ecology 3 Behaviour3.1 Acoustic behavior 3.2 Breeding behaviour4 Human interactions 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Fur seal
Fur seal
grooming itself at the Cape Cross
Cape Cross
Seal Reserve on the Skeleton CoastSkull of male brown fur sealThe brown fur seal is the largest and most robust fur seal. It has a large and broad head with a pointed snout that may be flat or upturned slightly.[2] They have external ear flaps (pinnae) and their whiskers (vibrissae) are long, and may extend backward past the pinnae, especially in adult males. The foreflippers are covered with sparse hair over about three-quarters of their length
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Invertebrate
Invertebrates are animals that neither possess nor develop a vertebral column (commonly known as a backbone or spine), derived from the notochord. This includes all animals apart from the subphylum Vertebrata. Familiar examples of invertebrates include insects; crabs, lobsters and their kin; snails, clams, octopuses and their kin; starfish, sea-urchins and their kin; jellyfish, and worms. The majority of animal species are invertebrates; one estimate puts the figure at 97%.[1] Many invertebrate taxa have a greater number and variety of species than the entire subphylum of Vertebrata.[2] Some of the so-called invertebrates, such as the Tunicata and Cephalochordata are more closely related to the vertebrates than to other invertebrates
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Sponge
Sponges, the members of the phylum Porifera
Porifera
(/pɒˈrɪfərə/; meaning "pore bearer"), are a basal Metazoa
Metazoa
clade as sister of the Diploblasts.[1][2][3][4][5] They are multicellular organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells. Sponges have unspecialized cells that can transform into other types and that often migrate between the main cell layers and the mesohyl in the process. Sponges do not have nervous, digestive or circulatory systems
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BirdLife International
BirdLife International (formerly the International Council for Bird Preservation) is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.[1] It has a membership of more than 2.5 million people and partner organizations in more than 100 countries. Major partners include Britain’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the Wild Bird Society of Japan, and the U.S. National Audubon Society. The group’s headquarters are located in Cambridge, UK. BirdLife International’s priorities include preventing extinction of bird species, identifying and safeguarding important sites for birds, maintaining and restoring key bird habitats, and empowering conservationists worldwide
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Australasian Gannet
The Australasian gannet
Australasian gannet
(Morus serrator), also known as Australian gannet and Tākapu, is a large seabird of the gannet family Sulidae. Adults are mostly white, with black flight feathers at the wingtips and lining the trailing edge of the wing. The central tail feathers are also black. The head is yellow, with a pale blue-grey bill edged in black, and blue-rimmed eyes. Young birds have mottled plumage in their first year, dark above and light below. The head is an intermediate mottled grey, with a dark bill. The birds gradually acquire more white in subsequent seasons until they reach maturity after five years. Their breeding habitat is on islands and the coast of New Zealand, Victoria and Tasmania, with 87% of the adult population in New Zealand. They normally nest in large colonies on coastal islands
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Black-faced Cormorant
The black-faced cormorant ( Phalacrocorax
Phalacrocorax
fuscescens), also known as the black-faced shag, is a medium-sized member of the cormorant family. Upperparts, including facial skin and bill, are black, with white underparts. It is endemic to coastal regions of southern Australia.Contents1 Description1.1 Plumages 1.2 Sexual Dimorphism 1.3 Vocalization2 Taxonomy 3 Habitat and Distribution3.1 Habitat4 Behaviour and Ecology4.1 Diet 4.2 Reproduction5 Threats 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit]A black-faced cormorant with juvenile plummage.Like other cormorant species, the black-faced cormorant is a large aquatic bird, with a long hooked bill, webbed feet, and monochromatic plumage.[2][3] This is one of the largest cormorants found in south-western Australia[2] and has pied plumage with the upper half of its body black and the undersides white
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Ruddy Turnstone
Tringa interpres Linnaeus, 1758The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is a small wading bird, one of two species of turnstone in the genus Arenaria. The scientific name is from Latin. The genus name arenaria derives from arenarius, "inhabiting sand, from arena, "sand". The specific interpres means "messenger"; when visiting Gotland
Gotland
in 1741, Linnaeus thought that the Swedish word Tolk "interpreter" applied to this species, but in the local dialect the word means "legs" and is used for the redshank.[2] It is now classified in the sandpiper family Scolopacidae
Scolopacidae
but was formerly sometimes placed in the plover family Charadriidae. It is a highly migratory bird, breeding in northern parts of Eurasia
Eurasia
and North America and flying south to winter on coastlines almost worldwide
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Burrunan Dolphin
The Burrunan dolphin
Burrunan dolphin
(Tursiops australis) is a species of bottlenose dolphin found in parts of Victoria, Australia. It was recognised as a species in 2011. By size, the Burrunan dolphin
Burrunan dolphin
is between the other two species of bottlenose dolphins, and only around 150 individuals have been found in two locations.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Distribution 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit] The species was formally named Tursiops australis by the researcher who described the species, Kate Charlton-Robb of Monash University, and colleagues
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Kelp
Akkesiphycaceae Alariaceae Chordaceae Costariaceae Laminariaceae Lessoniaceae PseudochordaceaeKelps are large brown algae seaweeds that make up the order Laminariales. There are about 30 different genera.[citation needed] Kelp
Kelp
grows in "underwater forests" (kelp forests) in shallow oceans, and is thought to have appeared in the Miocene, 23 to 5 million years ago.[3] The organisms require nutrient-rich water with temperatures between 6 and 14 °C (43 and 57 °F). They are known for their high growth rate—the genera Macrocystis
Macrocystis
and Nereocystis
Nereocystis
can grow as fast as half a metre a day, ultimately reaching 30 to 80 metres (100 to 260 ft).[4] Through the 19th century, the word "kelp" was closely associated with seaweeds that could be burned to obtain soda ash (primarily sodium carbonate)
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Protected Areas Of Victoria
Victoria is the smallest mainland state in Australia. As of 2008[update] it contained 2,850 separate protected areas with a total land area of 39,273 km2 (15,163 sq mi) (17.26% of the state's area)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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East Gippsland
East Gippsland
Gippsland
is the eastern region of Gippsland, Victoria, Australia covering 31,740 square kilometres (14%) of Victoria. It has a population of 80,114.[1]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Shire of East Gippsland, also called Far East Gippsland, covers two-thirds (66%) of East Gippsland's area and holds half (50%) of its population.[2] The Shire of East Gippsland
Gippsland
is confusingly also referred to simply as East Gippsland. It excludes the Shire of Wellington (Central Gippsland). This article (currently) refers mainly to "Far East Gippsland". East Gippsland's major towns include, from west to east, Bairnsdale (the largest town and administrative centre), Paynesville, Lakes Entrance, Orbost and Mallacoota
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Cape Howe Marine National Park
The Cape Howe
Cape Howe
Marine National Park is a protected marine national park in situated off eastern Gippsland
Gippsla

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