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Poor Folk
Poor Folk
Poor Folk
(Russian: Бедные люди, Bednye lyudi), sometimes translated as Poor People,[note] is the first novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, written over the span of nine months between 1844 and 1845. Dostoyevsky was in financial difficulty because of his extravagant lifestyle and his developing gambling addiction; although he had produced some translations of foreign novels, they had little success, and he decided to write a novel of his own to try to raise funds. Inspired by the works of Gogol, Pushkin, and Karamzin, as well as English and French authors, Poor Folk
Poor Folk
is written in the form of letters between the two main characters, Makar Devushkin and Varvara Dobroselova, who are poor second cousins. The novel showcases the life of poor people, their relationship with rich people, and poverty in general, all common themes of literary naturalism
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Poverty
Poverty
Poverty
is the scarcity or the lack of a certain (variant) amount of material possessions or money. Poverty
Poverty
is a multifaceted concept, which may include social, economic, and political elements
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Walter Scott
Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet, FRSE (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright, poet and historian. Many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature
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Clarissa
Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady is an epistolary novel by English writer Samuel Richardson, published in 1748. It tells the tragic story of a heroine whose quest for virtue is continually thwarted by her family and is regarded as one of the longest novels in the English language (based on estimated word count). It is generally regarded as Richardson's masterpiece.Picture from "Lettres angloises, ou histoire de Miss Clarisse Harlove." 1751.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Characters 3 Response 4 Radio and television adaptations 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksPlot summary[edit] Clarissa
Clarissa
Harlowe, the tragic heroine of Clarissa, is a beautiful and virtuous young lady whose family has become wealthy only recently and now desires to become part of the aristocracy
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Gothic Fiction
Gothic fiction, which is largely known by the subgenre of Gothic horror, is a genre or mode of literature and film that combines fiction and horror, death, and at times romance or happiness. Its origin is attributed to English author Horace Walpole, with his 1764 novel The Castle
Castle
of Otranto, subtitled (in its second edition) "A Gothic Story". The effect of Gothic fiction
Gothic fiction
feeds on a pleasing sort of terror, an extension of Romantic literary pleasures that were relatively new at the time of Walpole's novel. It originated in England in the second half of the 18th century where, following Walpole, it was further developed by Clara Reeve, Ann Radcliffe, William Thomas Beckford
William Thomas Beckford
and Matthew Lewis
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Ann Radcliffe
Ann Radcliffe
Ann Radcliffe
(born Ward, 9 July 1764 – 7 February 1823) was an English author and pioneer of the Gothic novel. Radcliffe's technique of explaining the supernatural elements of her novels has been credited with enabling Gothic fiction
Gothic fiction
to achieve respectability in the 1790s.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Literary life 3 Accusations of Anti-Catholicism 4 Art connection 5 Novels 6 Influence on later writers 7 Film reference 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBiography[edit] Radcliffe was born Ann Ward in Holborn, London, on 9 July 1764. Her father was William Ward (1737–1798), a haberdasher, who moved the family to Bath to manage a china shop in 1772. Her mother was Ann Oates (1726–1800) of Chesterfield.[2] Radcliffe occasionally lived with her Uncle, Thomas Bentley, in Chelsea, who was in partnership with a fellow Unitarian, Josiah Wedgwood, maker of the famous Wedgwood china
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Alexander Pushkin
Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin (/ˈpʊʃkɪn/;[1] Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, tr. Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin, IPA: [ɐlʲɪˈksandr sʲɪˈrɡʲejɪvʲɪtɕ ˈpuʂkʲɪn] ( listen); 6 June [O.S. 26 May] 1799 – 10 February [O.S. 29 January] 1837) was a Russian poet, playwright, and novelist of the Romantic era[2] who is considered by many to be the greatest Russian poet[3][4][5][6] and the founder of modern Russian literature.[7][8] Pushkin was born into Russian nobility
Russian nobility
in Moscow. Нis father, Sergey Lvovich Pushkin, belonged to Pushkin noble families. His matrilineal great-grandfather was Abram Petrovich Gannibal. He published his first poem at the age of fifteen and was widely recognized by the literary establishment by the time of his graduation from the Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum
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Vasily Zhukovsky
Vasily Zhukovsky
Vasily Zhukovsky
was the foremost Russian poet of the 1810s and a leading figure in Russian literature
Russian literature
in the first half of the 19th century. He held a high position at the Romanov
Romanov
court as tutor to the Grand Duchess Alexandra Feodorovna and later to her son, the future Tsar-Liberator Alexander II. Zhukovsky is credited with introducing the Romantic Movement into Russia. The main body of his literary output consists of free translations covering an impressively wide range of poets, from ancients like Ferdowsi
Ferdowsi
and Homer
Homer
to his contemporaries Goethe, Schiller, Byron, and others
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Epic Poetry
An epic poem, epic, epos, or epopee is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.[1] The ancient Indian Mahabharata
Mahabharata
is the longest epic written[2][3]. The Mahabharat is comprised of 100,000 śloka or over 200,000 verse lines (each shloka is a couplet), as well as long prose passages. At about 1.8 million words in total, the Mahābhārata is roughly ten times the length of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey
Odyssey
combined, or about four times the length of the Rāmāyaṇa[4]. Another type of epic poetry is epyllion (plural: epyllia), which is a brief narrative poem with a romantic or mythological theme. The term, which means "little epic", came into use in the nineteenth century
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Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
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Romance (heroic Literature)
As a literary genre of high culture, romance or chivalric romance is a type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the aristocratic circles of High Medieval
Medieval
and Early Modern Europe. They were fantastic stories about marvel-filled adventures, often of a knight-errant portrayed as having heroic qualities, who goes on a quest, yet it is "the emphasis on love and courtly manners distinguishes it from the chanson de geste and other kinds of epic, in which masculine military heroism predominates."[1] Popular literature also drew on themes of romance, but with ironic, satiric or burlesque intent. Romances reworked legends, fairy tales, and history to suit the readers' and hearers' tastes, but by c. 1600 they were out of fashion, and Miguel de Cervantes famously burlesqued them in his novel Don Quixote
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Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
Saavedra[b] (/sərˈvæntiːz/;[3] Spanish: [miˈɣel de θerˈβantes saaˈβeðɾa]; 29 September 1547 (assumed) – 23 April 1616 N.S.)[4] was a Spanish writer who is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the Spanish language and one of the world's pre-eminent novelists. His masterpiece Don Quixote has been translated into more languages than any other book except the Bible. His major work, Don Quixote, sometimes considered the first modern novel,[5] is a classic of Western literature, regarded among the best works of fiction ever written.[6] His influence on the Spanish language has been so great that the language is often called la lengua de Cervantes ("the language of Cervantes").[7] He has also been dubbed El príncipe de los ingenios ("The Prince of Wits").[8] In 1569, in forced exile from Castile, Cervantes moved to Rome, where he worked as chamber assistant of a cardinal
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Moscow
Moscow
Moscow
(/ˈmɒskoʊ, -kaʊ/; Russian: Москва́, tr. Moskva, IPA: [mɐˈskva] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 12.2 million residents within the city limits[11] and 17.1 million within the urban area.[12] Moscow
Moscow
is recognized as a Russian federal city. Moscow
Moscow
is a major political, economic, cultural, and scientific centre of Russia
Russia
and Eastern Europe, as well as the largest city entirely on the European continent. By broader definitions Moscow
Moscow
is among the world's largest cities, being the 14th largest metro area, the 18th largest agglomeration, the 15th largest urban area, and the 11th largest by population within city limits worldwide
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Sentimental Novel
The sentimental novel or the novel of sensibility is an 18th-century literary genre which celebrates the emotional and intellectual concepts of sentiment, sentimentalism, and sensibility. Sentimentalism, which is to be distinguished from sensibility, was a fashion in both poetry and prose fiction beginning in the eighteenth century in reaction to the rationalism of the Augustan Age. Sentimental novels relied on emotional response, both from their readers and characters. They feature scenes of distress and tenderness, and the plot is arranged to advance both emotions and actions. The result is a valorization of "fine feeling," displaying the characters as a model for refined, sensitive emotional effect
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Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon
Napoleon
I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution
French Revolution
and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition
Third Coalition
(1805), the Fourth (1806–07), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815). Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France
France
in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army
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Military Engineering-Technical University
The Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
Military Engineering-Technical University (Nikolaevsky) (Russian: Санкт-Петербургский Военный инженерно-технический университет, VITU), previously known as the Saint Petersburg Nikolaevsky Engineering
Engineering
Academy, was established in 1810 under Alexander I. The university is situated in the former barracks of the Cavalier-Guard Regiment where the university was founded.[1]Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 The Second World War3 Traditions of Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
High School of Military Engineers 4 Alumni and faculty 5 Sources 6 External linksDescription[edit] Military Engineering- Technical University
Technical University
is a higher military educational institution preparing officers of engineering and building specialties for all branches of troops and navy
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