HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Polyptych
A polyptych (/ˈpɒlɪptɪk/ POL-ip-tik; Greek: poly- "many" and ptychē "fold") is a painting (usually panel painting) which is divided into sections, or panels. Specifically, a "diptych" is a two-part work of art; a "triptych" is a three-part work; a tetraptych or quadriptych has four parts; pentaptych five; hexaptych six; heptaptych (or septych in Latin) seven; and octaptych eight parts. Polyptychs typically display one "central" or "main" panel that is usually the largest of the attachments, while the other panels are called "side" panels, or "wings". Sometimes, as evident in the Ghent and Isenheim works, the hinged panels can be varied in arrangement to show different "views" or "openings" in the piece. Polyptychs were most commonly created by early Renaissance
Renaissance
painters, the majority of which designed their works to be altarpieces in churches and cathedrals
[...More...]

"Polyptych" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
[...More...]

"Edo Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hubert Van Eyck
Hubert van Eyck
Hubert van Eyck
(also Huybrecht van Eyck) (c. 1385–90 – 18 September 1426) was an Early Netherlandish
Early Netherlandish
painter and older brother of Jan van Eyck,[1] as well as Lambert and Margareta, also painters. The absence of any single work that he can clearly be said to have completed continues to make assessment of his achievement highly uncertain, although for centuries he had the reputation of being an outstanding founding artist of Early Netherlandish
Early Netherlandish
painting.[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Legacy 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] He was probably born in Maaseik, in what is now the Belgian province of Limburg, into a family in the gentry. As the name was not a very common one, he is probably the "Magister Hubertus, pictor" recorded as having been paid in 1409 for panels in the church of Onze Lieve Vrouwe, Tongeren
[...More...]

"Hubert Van Eyck" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Panel Painting
A panel painting is a painting made on a flat panel made of wood, either a single piece, or a number of pieces joined together. Until canvas became the more popular support medium in the 16th century, it was the normal form of support for a painting not on a wall (fresco) or vellum, which was used for miniatures in illuminated manuscripts and paintings for the framing.Contents1 History 2 Panel construction and preparation 3 Painting techniques 4 Conservation and scientific analysis 5 Types of wood 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]Boy from Al-Fayum, 2nd century CE (a mummy portrait). Encaustic on wood—note the cracks. Panel painting
Panel painting
is very old; it was a very prestigious medium in Greece and Rome, but only very few examples of ancient panel paintings have survived. A series of 6th century BC painted tablets from Pitsa (Greece) represent the oldest surviving Greek panel paintings
[...More...]

"Panel Painting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nuno Gonçalves
Nuno Gonçalves
Nuno Gonçalves
was a 15th-century Portuguese court painter for King Afonso V of Portugal.[1] He is credited for the painting of the Saint Vincent Panels (Paineis de São Vicente de Fora)
[...More...]

"Nuno Gonçalves" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Matthias Grünewald
Matthias Grünewald
Matthias Grünewald
(c. 1470 – 31 August 1528) was a German Renaissance painter of religious works who ignored Renaissance classicism to continue the style of late medieval Central European art into the 16th century. His first name is also given as Mathis and his surname as Gothart or Neithardt. Only ten paintings—several consisting of many panels—and thirty-five drawings survive, all religious, although many others were lost at sea in the Baltic on their way to Sweden as war booty. His reputation was obscured until the late nineteenth century, and many of his paintings were attributed to Albrecht Dürer, who is now seen as his stylistic antithesis. His largest and most famous work is the Isenheim Altarpiece
Isenheim Altarpiece
created c 1512 to 1516.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Reputation3.1 Veneration4 Gallery 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit]Grünewald's John the Evangelist
[...More...]

"Matthias Grünewald" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
[...More...]

"Renaissance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Church (building)
A church building or church house, often simply called a church, is a building used for Christian
Christian
religious activities, particularly for worship services. The term in its architectural sense is most often used by Christians to refer to their religious buildings, but it is sometimes used (by analogy) to refer to buildings of other religions.[1] In traditional Christian
Christian
architecture, the church is often arranged in the shape of a Christian
Christian
cross
[...More...]

"Church (building)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cathedral
A cathedral is a Christian church which contains the seat of a bishop,[1] thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate.[2] The counterpart term for such a church in German is Dom from Latin
Latin
domus ecclesiae or domus episcopalis; also Italian Duomo, Dutch Domkerk and cognates in many other European languages
[...More...]

"Cathedral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e[a] is a genre of Japanese art
Japanese art
which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. Its artists produced woodblock prints and paintings of such subjects as female beauties; kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers; scenes from history and folk tales; travel scenes and landscapes; flora and fauna; and erotica. The term ukiyo-e (浮世絵) translates as "picture[s] of the floating world". Edo
Edo
(modern Tokyo) became the seat of government for the military dictatorship in the early 17th century. The merchant class at the bottom of the social order benefited most from the city's rapid economic growth. Many indulged in the entertainments of kabuki theatre, courtesans, and geisha of the pleasure districts
[...More...]

"Ukiyo-e" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Triptych
A triptych (/ˈtrɪptɪk/ TRIP-tik; from the Greek adjective τρίπτυχον "triptukhon" ("three-fold"), from tri, i.e., "three" and ptysso, i.e., "to fold" or ptyx, i.e., "fold")[1][2] is a work of art (usually a panel painting) that is divided into three sections, or three carved panels that are hinged together and can be folded shut or displayed open. It is therefore a type of polyptych, the term for all multi-panel works. The middle panel is typically the largest and it is flanked by two smaller related works, although there are triptychs of equal-sized panels
[...More...]

"Triptych" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isenheim Altarpiece
The Isenheim
Isenheim
Altarpiece
Altarpiece
is an altarpiece sculpted and painted by, respectively, the Germans Niclaus of Haguenau and Matthias Grünewald in 1512–1516.[1] It is on display at the Unterlinden Museum
Unterlinden Museum
at Colmar, Alsace, in France. The museum celebrated the 500th anniversary of the work in 2012.[2] It is Grünewald's largest work, and is regarded as his masterpiece. It was painted for the Monastery of St. Anthony in Isenheim
Isenheim
near Colmar, which specialized in hospital work. The Antonine monks of the monastery were noted for their care of plague sufferers as well as their treatment of skin diseases, such as ergotism
[...More...]

"Isenheim Altarpiece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carlo Crivelli
Carlo Crivelli
Carlo Crivelli
( Venice
Venice
c. 1430 – Ascoli Piceno
Ascoli Piceno
1495) was an Italian Renaissance
Renaissance
painter of conservative Late Gothic decorative sensibility,[1] who spent his early years in the Veneto, where he absorbed influences from the Vivarini, Squarcione and Mantegna. He left the Veneto
Veneto
by 1458 and spent most of the remainder of his career in the March of Ancona, where he developed a distinctive personal style that contrasts with that of his Venetian contemporary Giovanni Bellini.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Work 4 Reputation 5 Works 6 Gallery of paintings 7 See also 8 Notes 9 Sources 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Crivelli was born around 1430–35 in Venice
Venice
to a family of painters and received his artistic formation there and in Padua
[...More...]

"Carlo Crivelli" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diptych
A diptych (/ˈdɪptɪk/; from the Greek δίπτυχον,[1] di "two" + ptychē "fold") is any object with two flat plates attached at a hinge. For example, the standard notebook and school exercise book of the ancient world was a diptych consisting of a pair of such plates that contained a recessed space filled with wax. Writing was accomplished by scratching the wax surface with a stylus. When the notes were no longer needed, the wax could be slightly heated and then smoothed to allow reuse
[...More...]

"Diptych" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.