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Platinum Equity
Platinum Equity, LLC is an American private equity investment firm founded by Tom Gores in 1995. The firm focuses on leveraged buyout investments of established companies in the U.S., Europe and Asia.[1] The firm is headquartered in Los Angeles, California
California
with regional offices in Boston, Greenwich, New York City, London, and Singapore
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Private Equity
Private equity
Private equity
typically refers to investment funds organized as limited partnerships that are not publicly traded and whose investors are typically large institutional investors, university endowments, or wealthy individuals. Private equity
Private equity
firms are known for their extensive use of debt financing to purchase companies, which they restructure and attempt to resell for a higher value. Debt
Debt
financing reduces corporate taxation burdens and is one of the principal ways in which private equity firms make business more profitable for investors.[1] Private equity
Private equity
might also create value by overcoming agency costs and better aligning the incentives of corporate managers with those of their shareholders. P.E
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Financial Sponsor
A financial sponsor is a private equity investment firm, particularly a private equity firm that engages in leveraged buyout transactions.[1]Contents1 Sponsors and management 2 Sponsors and other investors 3 See also 4 ReferencesSponsors and management[edit] In addition to bringing capital to a deal, financial sponsors are expected to bring a combination of capital markets expertise, various important contacts, strategies for operational improvement, and the experience of owning leveraged companies.[2] As the owners of the company, financial sponsors rarely manage a company directly and are most active in issues relating to the company's capital structure and balance sheet as well as strategic initiatives including mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, and management restructurings
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Venture Capital
Venture capital
Venture capital
(VC) is a type of private equity,[1] a form of financing that is provided by firms or funds to small, early-stage, emerging firms that are deemed to have high growth potential, or which have demonstrated high growth (in terms of number of employees, annual revenue, or both). Venture capital
Venture capital
firms or funds invest in these early-stage companies in exchange for equity, or an ownership stake, in the companies they invest in. Venture capitalists take on the risk of financing risky start-ups in the hopes that some of the firms they support will become successful. The start-ups are usually based on an innovative technology or business model and they are usually from the high technology industries, such as information technology (IT), clean technology or biotechnology. The typical venture capital investment occurs after an initial "seed funding" round
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Mezzanine Capital
In finance, mezzanine capital is any subordinated debt or preferred equity instrument that represents a claim on a company's assets which is senior only to that of the common shares. Mezzanine financings can be structured either as debt (typically an unsecured and subordinated note) or preferred stock. Mezzanine capital is often a more expensive financing source for a company than secured debt or senior debt. The higher cost of capital associated with mezzanine financings is the result of its being an unsecured, subordinated (or junior) obligation in a company's capital structure (i.e., in the event of default, the mezzanine financing is only repaid after all senior obligations have been satisfied). Additionally, mezzanine financings, which are usually private placements, are often used by smaller companies and may involve greater overall levels of leverage than issues in the high-yield market; they thus involve additional risk
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Growth Capital
Growth capital (also called expansion capital and growth equity) is a type of private equity investment, usually a minority investment, in relatively mature companies that are looking for capital to expand or restructure operations, enter new markets or finance a significant acquisition without a change of control of the business.[1] Companies that seek growth capital will often do so in order to finance a transformational event in their lifecycle
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Private Equity Secondary Market
In finance, the private equity secondary market (also often called private equity secondaries or secondaries) refers to the buying and selling of pre-existing investor commitments to private equity and other alternative investment funds
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Equity Co-investment
An equity co-investment (or co-investment) is a minority investment, made directly into an operating company, alongside a financial sponsor or other private equity investor, in a leveraged buyout, recapitalization or growth capital transaction. In certain circumstances, venture capital firms may also seek co-investors.Diagram of the structure of an equity co-investment in a portfolio company alongside a financial sponsor Private equity
Private equity
firms seek co-investors for several reasons. Most important of these is that co-investments allow a manager to make larger investments without either dedicating too much of the fund's capital to a single transaction (i.e., exposure issues) or sharing the deal with competing private equity firms. Co-investors bring a friendly source of capital. Typically, co-investors are existing limited partners in an investment fund managed by the lead financial sponsor in a transaction
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History Of Private Equity And Venture Capital
The history of private equity and venture capital and the development of these asset classes has occurred through a series of boom and bust cycles since the middle of the 20th century. Within the broader private equity industry, two distinct sub-industries, leveraged buyouts and venture capital experienced growth along parallel, although interrelated tracks. Since the origins of the modern private equity industry in 1946, there have been four major epochs marked by three boom and bust cycles. The early history of private equity—from 1946 through 1981—was characterized by relatively small volumes of private equity investment, rudimentary firm organizations and limited awareness of and familiarity with the private equity industry
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Early History Of Private Equity
The early history of private equity relates to one of the major periods in the history of private equity and venture capital. Within the broader private equity industry, two distinct sub-industries, leveraged buyouts and venture capital experienced growth along parallel although interrelated tracks. The origins of the modern private equity industry trace back to 1946 with the formation of the first venture capital firms
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Private Equity In The 1980s
Private equity
Private equity
in the 1980s relates to one of the major periods in the history of private equity and venture capital. Within the broader private equity industry, two distinct sub-industries, leveraged buyouts and venture capital experienced growth along parallel although interrelated tracks. The development of the private equity and venture capital asset classes has occurred through a series of boom and bust cycles since the middle of the 20th century. The 1980s saw the first major boom and bust cycle in private equity. The cycle which is typically marked by the 1982 acquisition of Gibson Greetings and ending just over a decade later was characterized by a dramatic surge in leveraged buyout (LBO) activity financed by junk bonds
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Private Equity In The 1990s
Private equity
Private equity
in the 1990s relates to one of the major periods in the history of private equity and venture capital. Within the broader private equity industry, two distinct sub-industries, leveraged buyouts and venture capital experienced growth along parallel although interrelated tracks. The development of the private equity and venture capital asset classes has occurred through a series of boom and bust cycles since the middle of the 20th century
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Private Equity In The 2000s
Private equity
Private equity
in the 2000s relates to one of the major periods in the history of private equity and venture capital. Within the broader private equity industry, two distinct sub-industries, leveraged buyouts and venture capital experienced growth along parallel although interrelated tracks. The development of the private equity and venture capital asset classes has occurred through a series of boom and bust cycles since the middle of the 20th century. As the 20th century ended, so, too, did the dot-com bubble and the tremendous growth in venture capital that had marked the previous five years
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Management Buyout
A management buyout (MBO) is a form of acquisition where a company's existing managers acquire a large part or all of the company from either the parent company or from the private owners. Management and leveraged buyouts became phenomena of the 1980s. MBOs originated in the US and traversed the Atlantic, spreading first to the UK and throughout the rest of Europe. The venture capital industry has played a crucial role in the development of buyouts in Europe, especially in smaller deals in the UK, the Netherlands, and France.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Purpose 3 Financing3.1 Debt
Debt
financing 3.2 Private equity
Private equity
financing 3.3 Seller financing4 Examples 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Management buyouts are similar in all major legal aspects to any other acquisition of a company
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TUI AG
TUI Group
TUI Group
(German: TUI (Touristik Union International) Aktiengesellschaft) is a multinational travel and tourism company headquartered in Hannover, Germany.[3] It is the largest leisure, travel and tourism company in the world,[4] and owns travel agencies, hotels, airlines, cruise ships and retail stores
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Divisional Buyout
A divisional buyout or carveout, in finance, is a transaction in which a corporate division, business unit or subsidiary is acquired using the same financial structuring as a leveraged buyout. Typically, in these transactions, the financial sponsor will turn the acquired business into a standalone company, necessitating the creation of certain functions that were formerly provided by the parent company. Divisional reverse leveraged buyout (D-RLBO)[edit] A D-RLBO is a leveraged buyout of a division or subsidiary that subsequently comes to trade on the public markets. From the point of view of a divesting firm, the D-RLBO permits the sale of a subsidiary to its management and/or private investors who subsequently restructure its assets and capital structure with the purpose of enhancing overall firm value. Example: Avon Products
Avon Products
Inc. divested specialty jeweler Tiffany & Co
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