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Plain People
Plain people
Plain people
are Christian groups characterized by separation from the world and by simple living, including plain dressing. Many Plain people have an Anabaptist
Anabaptist
background. These denominations are of German, Swiss German or Dutch ancestry
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Nonconformity To The World
Nonconformity to the world, also called separation from the world, is a Christian doctrine based on Romans 12:2:,[1][2] 2. Corinthians 6:17 and other verses of the New Testament
New Testament
that became important among different Protestant groups, especially among Anabaptist. The corresponding German word used by Anabaptists is Absonderung.[3] Nonconformity is primarily expressed through the practices of plain dress and simple living.Contents1 Biblical basis 2 History 3 Literature 4 References 5 External linksBiblical basis[edit]Do not be conformed to this world but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God—what is good and acceptable and perfect. Romans 12:2 Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate. 2. Corinthians 6:17 If any man love the world, the love of the Father is not in him
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Jacob Ammann
Jakob Ammann
Jakob Ammann
(also Jacob Amman, Amann) (12 February 1644 – between 1712 and 1730)[1] was an Anabaptist
Anabaptist
leader and namesake of the Amish
Amish
religious movement.Contents1 Personal life1.1 Conversion to Anabaptism 1.2 Death2 Theology and practice 3 Schism3.1 Background 3.2 Beginning 3.3 Excommunications 3.4 Attempts at reconciliation4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksPersonal life[edit] Jakob Ammann
Jakob Ammann
was born on 12 February 1644 in Erlenbach im Simmental, Canton of Bern, Switzerland, to Michael and Anna (née Rupp) Ammann. Erlenbach church records note the baptism of a Jacob Ammann on 12 February 1644, who was probably the Jakob Ammann
Jakob Ammann
from whom the Amish received their name.[1] His grandfather has been identified as Ulrich Ammann. All three Ammanns were tailors
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Christian Revival
Revivalism is increased spiritual interest or renewal in the life of a church congregation or society, with a local, national or global effect. This should be distinguished from the use of the term "revival" to refer to an evangelistic meeting or series of meetings (see Revival meeting). Revivals are seen as the restoration of the church itself to a vital and fervent relationship with God after a period of moral decline. Mass conversions of non-believers are viewed by church leaders as having positive moral effects. Within Christian studies the concept of revival is derived from biblical narratives of national decline and restoration during the history of the Israelites. In particular, narrative accounts of the Kingdoms of Israel and Judah emphasise periods of national decline and revival associated with the rule of various righteous and wicked kings
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Conservative Holiness Movement
The conservative holiness movement is a loosely defined group of conservative Wesleyan-Holiness Christian denominations that trace their origin back to Methodist
Methodist
roots and the teachings of John Wesley. This movement became distinct from other Wesleyan-Holiness bodies in the mid-20th century amid disagreements over modesty in dress, entertainment and other "old holiness standards." There are an estimated 2,000 congregations in the movement.[1]Contents1 History 2 Denominations 3 Educational institutions 4 Missions 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Holiness movement
Holiness movement
was largely contained within Methodism
Methodism
during the 19th century. By the 1880s a persistent wave of "come-outism" was beginning to gather steam
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Bible Methodist Connection Of Churches
The Bible Methodist
Methodist
Connection of Churches is a Methodist
Methodist
denomination within the conservative holiness movement.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Bible
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Mormon Fundamentalism
Latter Day Saints portal  Bookv t e Mormon fundamentalism
Mormon fundamentalism
(also called fundamentalist Mormonism) is a belief in the validity of selected fundamental aspects of Mormonism
Mormonism
as taught and practiced in the nineteenth century, particularly during the administrations of Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
and Brigham Young, the first two presidents of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
(LDS Church). Mormon fundamentalists seek to uphold tenets and practices no longer held by mainstream Mormons (members of the LDS Church). The principle most often associated with Mormon fundamentalism
Mormon fundamentalism
is plural marriage, a form of polygyny first taught in the Latter Day Saint movement by Joseph Smith, the founder of the movement
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Precautionary Principle
The precautionary principle (or precautionary approach) generally defines actions on issues considered to be uncertain, for instance applied in assessing risk management.[1] The principle is used by policy makers to justify discretionary decisions in situations where there is the possibility of harm from making a certain decision (e.g. taking a particular course of action) when extensive scientific knowledge on the matter is lacking. The principle implies that there is a social responsibility to protect the public from exposure to harm, when scientific investigation has found a plausible risk
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World (theology)
The world is the planet Earth
Earth
and all life upon it, including human civilization.[1] In a philosophical context, the "world" is the whole of the physical Universe, or an ontological world (the "world" of an individual). In a theological context, the world is the material or the profane sphere, as opposed to the celestial, spiritual, transcendent or sacred. The "end of the world" refers to scenarios of the final end of human history, often in religious contexts. History of the world
History of the world
is commonly understood as spanning the major geopolitical developments of about five millennia, from the first civilizations to the present
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Swiss Brethren
The Swiss Brethren are a branch of Anabaptism that started in Zürich, spread to nearby cities and towns, and then was exported to neighboring countries.[1]:62 Today's Swiss Mennonite Conference can be traced to the Swiss Brethren. In 1525, Felix Manz, Conrad Grebel, George Blaurock and other radical evangelical reformers broke from Ulrich Zwingli and formed a new group because they felt reforms were not moving fast enough.[2] Rejection of infant baptism was a distinguishing belief of the Swiss Brethren. On the basis of Sola scriptura doctrine, the Swiss Brethren declared that since the Bible does not mention infant baptism, it should not be practiced by the church. This belief was subsequently refuted by Ulrich Zwingli. Consequently, there was a public dispute, in which the council affirmed Zwingli's position
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Menno Simons
Menno Simons
Menno Simons
(1496 – 31 January 1561) was a former Catholic priest from the Friesland
Friesland
region of the Low Countries
Low Countries
who became an influential Anabaptist
Anabaptist
religious leader. Simons was a contemporary of the Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
and it is from his name that his followers became known as Mennonites. "Menno Simons" (/ˈmɛnoː ˈsimɔns/) is the Dutch version of his name; the Frisian version is Minne Simens (/ˈmɪnə ˈsimn̩s/),[1] the possessive "s" creating a patronym meaning "Minne, son of Simen" (cf
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Dordrecht Confession Of Faith
The Dordrecht Confession of Faith is a statement of religious beliefs adopted by Dutch Mennonite leaders at a meeting in Dordrecht, the Netherlands, on 21 April 1632. Its 18 articles emphasize belief in salvation through Jesus Christ, baptism, nonviolence (non-resistance), withdrawing from, or shunning those who are excommunicated from the Church,[1] feet washing ("a washing of the saints' feet"),[2] and avoidance of taking oaths. It was an influential part of the Radical Reformation and remains an important religious document to many modern Anabaptist groups such as the Amish. In 1725, Jacob Gottschalk met with sixteen other ministers from southeastern Pennsylvania and adopted the Confession
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William Penn
William Penn
William Penn
(14 October 1644 – 30 July 1718) was the son of Sir William Penn, and was an English real estate entrepreneur, philosopher, early Quaker, and founder of the English North American colony the Province of Pennsylvania. He was an early advocate of democracy and religious freedom, notable for his good relations and successful treaties with the Lenape
Lenape
Native Americans. Under his direction, the city of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
was planned and developed. In 1681, King Charles II handed over a large piece of his American land holdings to Penn to appease the debts the king owed to Penn's father. This land included present-day Pennsylvania and Delaware
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Shakers
The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, more commonly known as the Shakers, is a millenarian restorationist Christian sect founded in the 18th century in England. They were initially known as "Shaking Quakers" because of their ecstatic behavior during worship services. As early as 1747, women assumed leadership roles within the sect, notably Jane Wardley, Mother Ann Lee, and Mother Lucy Wright. Shakers
Shakers
settled in colonial America, with initial settlements in New Lebanon, New York (called Mount Lebanon after 1861). They practice a celibate and communal lifestyle, pacifism, and their model of equality of the sexes, which they institutionalized in their society in the 1780s
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Religious Persecution
Religious persecution
Religious persecution
is the systematic mistreatment of an individual or group of individuals as a response to their religious beliefs or affiliations or lack thereof. The tendency of societies or groups within society to alienate or repress different subcultures is a recurrent theme in human history. Moreover, because a person's religion often determines to a significant extent his or her morality, worldview, self-image, attitudes towards others, and overall personal identity, religious differences can be significant cultural, personal, and social factors. Religious persecution
Religious persecution
may be triggered by religious bigotry (i.e. members of a dominant group denigrating religions other than their own) or by the state when it views a particular religious group as a threat to its interests or security
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Berks County, Pennsylvania
Berks County (Pennsylvania German: Barricks Kaundi) is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 411,442.[2] The county seat is Reading.[3] Berks County comprises the Reading, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which is also included in the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD Combined Statistical Area
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