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Pippin Of Landen
Pepin I (also Peppin, Pipin, or Pippin) of Landen
Landen
(c. 580 – 27 February 640), also called the Elder or the Old, was the Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Austrasia
under the Merovingian king Dagobert I
Dagobert I
from 623 to 629. He was also the mayor for Sigebert III
Sigebert III
from 639 until his death. Through the marriage of his daughter Begga
Begga
to Ansegisel, a son of Arnulf of Metz, the clans of the Pippinids and the Arnulfings were united, giving rise to a family which would eventually rule the Franks as the Carolingians. Life[edit] Pepin's father is named Carloman[1] by the Chronicle of Fredegar, the chief source for his life. His byname comes from his probable birthplace: Landen, modern Belgium
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Pepin I Of Aquitaine
Pepin I or Pepin I of Aquitaine
Pepin I of Aquitaine
(797 – December 13, 838) was King of Aquitaine and Duke of Maine. Pepin was the second son of Emperor Louis the Pious
Louis the Pious
and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye. When his father assigned to each of his sons a kingdom (within the Empire) in August 817, he received Aquitaine, which had been Louis's own subkingdom during his father Charlemagne's reign. Ermoldus Nigellus was his court poet and accompanied him on a campaign into Brittany
Brittany
in 824. Pepin rebelled in 830 at the insistence of his brother Lothair's advisor Wala. He took an army of Gascons with him and marched all the way to Paris, with the support of the Neustrians. His father marched back from a campaign in Brittany
Brittany
all the way to Compiègne, where Pepin surrounded his forces and captured him
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Calendar Of Saints
The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".[1] The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin
Latin
as the martyr's dies natalis ("day of birth")
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Andernach
Andernach
Andernach
(German pronunciation: [ˈandɐˌnax]) is a town in the district of Mayen-Koblenz, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, of currently[when?] about 30,000 inhabitants. It is situated towards the end of the Neuwied
Neuwied
basin on the left bank of the Rhine
Rhine
between the former tiny fishing village of Fornich in the north and the mouth of the small river Nette in the southeast, just 13 miles (21 km) north of Koblenz, with its five external town districts: Kell, Miesenheim, Eich, Namedy, and Bad Tönisstein. A few hundred metres downstream of Andernach
Andernach
the Rhine
Rhine
valley narrows from both sides forming the northern part of the romantic Middle Rhine
Rhine
stretch. Already in Roman times the place the narrow passage begins was named "Porta Antunnacensis" or Andernachian Gate
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Clovis II
Clovis II
Clovis II
(634 – 27 November 657 or 658) succeeded his father Dagobert I
Dagobert I
in 639 as King of Neustria
King of Neustria
and Burgundy. His brother Sigebert III
Sigebert III
had been King of Austrasia
Austrasia
since 634. He was initially under the regency of his mother Nanthild until her death in her early thirties in 642. This death allowed him to fall under the influence of the secular magnates, who reduced the royal power in their own favour; first Aega, and then Erchinoald. Clovis' wife, Balthild, whose Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
origins are now considered doubtful, was sold into slavery in Gaul. She had been owned by Clovis' mayor of the palace, Erchinoald, who gave her to him to garner royal favour.[1] She bore him three sons who all became kings after his death
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Nanthild
Nanthild (c. 610 – 642), also known as Nantéchilde, Nanthechilde, Nanthildis, Nanthilde, or Nantechildis, was a Frankish queen consort and regent, the third of many consorts of Dagobert I, king of the Franks (629–639). She was regent during the minority of her son from 639 until 642. Life[edit] She was of Saxon lineage, born about 608 or 610. The Lexikon des Mittelalters calls her ein Mädchen aus dem Dienstpersonal ("a maiden of the royal [ Austrasian ] household"). Her elevation to consort may have given importance to her relatives: her brother Lanthegisel was an important landowner in the Limousin and a relation of Aldegisel. Dagobert set aside his wife Gomatrud to marry her, ca. 629; to her was born Clovis II, second eldest of Dagobert's surviving sons and the one who succeeded him in Neustria
Neustria
and Burgundy
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Aega (mayor Of The Palace)
Aega (also spelled Ega or Egua) was the mayor of the palace and regent, alongside the queen mother Nanthild, of Neustria
Neustria
and Burgundy from 639, on the death of Dagobert I, to his death in 641, during the reign of the minor Clovis II. He was a hardened opponent of the local Burgundian nobility. On his death, at Clichy, Nanthild replaced him in Burgundy by Flaochad, a Frank and like opponent of the local power factions. The magnates elevated Erchinoald to his mayoralty in Neustria.Preceded by Gundoald Mayor of the Palace of Neustria 639–641 Succeeded by ErchinoaldPreceded by Brodulf Mayor of the Palace of Burgundy 639–641 Succeeded by FlaochadThis biographical article of a European noble is a stub
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Cunibert, Bishop Of Cologne
Saint Cunibert, Cunipert, or Kunibert (c. 600 – 12 November c. 663) was the ninth bishop of Cologne, from 627 to his death. Contemporary sources mention him between 627 and 643. Life[edit] Cunibert
Cunibert
(sometimes spelled Honoberht) was born somewhere along the Moselle
Moselle
to a family of the local Ripuarian Frankish aristocracy, and educated in Metz at the court of Chlothar II. He entered the church and became archdeacon of Trier.[1] He was made bishop of Cologne
Cologne
in 623.[2][1] As bishop, Cunibert
Cunibert
served as an advisor to King Dagobert I. In 633 or 634 Dagobert's son and heir Sigebert III
Sigebert III
was invested as king of Austrasia. Following this, Dagobert made Cunibert
Cunibert
and Adalgisel, the mayor of the palace, co-regents of the kingdom
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Compiègne
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Compiègne
Compiègne
(French pronunciation: ​[kɔ̃pjɛɲ]) is a commune in the Oise
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Metz
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Part of the series onLorraineFlag of Lorraine
Lorraine
since the 13th centuryHistory
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Canonized
Canonization
Canonization
is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognized saints. Originally, a person was recognized as a saint without any formal process. Later, different processes were developed, such as those used today in the Anglican Communion, the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Oriental Orthodox Church.Contents1 Historical development 2 Anglican Communion 3 Catholic Church3.1 Nature 3.2 Procedure prior to reservation to the Apostolic See 3.3 Exclusive reservation to the Apostolic See 3.4 Procedure from 1734–38 to 1983 3.5 Since 1983 3.6 Equipollent canonization4 Eastern Orthodox Church 5 Oriental Orthodox Church 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistorical development[edit] The first persons honored as saints were the martyrs
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Martyrology
A martyrology is a catalogue or list of martyrs and other saints and beati arranged in the calendar order of their anniversaries or feasts. Local martyrologies record exclusively the custom of a particular Church. Local lists were enriched by names borrowed from neighbouring churches.[1] Consolidation occurred, by the combination of several local martyrologies, with or without borrowings from literary sources. This is the now accepted meaning in the Latin Church
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Itta
Itta of Metz, O.S.B. (also Ida, Itte or Iduberga; 592–8 May 652) was the wife of Pepin of Landen, Mayor of the Palace of the Kingdom of Austrasia. After his death, she founded the Abbey of Nivelles, where she became a Benedictine
Benedictine
nun along with her daughter, Gertrude of Nivelles. Both are honored as saints by the Catholic Church.Contents1 Life 2 Children 3 Patronage 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksLife[edit] There is no direct record of her parents, but it has been suggested that she came from a family of senatorial status which had originated in Aquitaine, and was a daughter of Arnoald, Bishop of Metz, son of Ansbertus
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Pepin, Count Of Vermandois
Pepin II Quentin (French: Pépin; 817 – after 850) was the first count of Vermandois, lord of Senlis, Péronne, and Saint Quentin. He was the son of King Bernard of Italy
Bernard of Italy
(a grandson of Charlemagne) and his Queen, Cunigunda of Laon.[1] Pepin's wife is unknown; Their children were:Bernard (c. 845 – before 893), count of Laon[1], in 877/878. Pepin III (c. 846 – 893), count of Senlis
Senlis
and lord of Valois (877–893)[1], Count of Valois(886–893). Herbert I, Count of Vermandois (c. 850–907)[1] Cunigunda?Notes[edit]^ a b c d McKitterick 1999, p. 360-361.References[edit]McKitterick, Rosamond (1999). The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians
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Grimoald The Elder
Grimoald I (616–657), called the Elder (in French, Grimaud l'Ainé), was the Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
Austrasia
from 643 to 656. He was the son of Pepin of Landen
Pepin of Landen
and Itta.[2][3] Biography[edit] With the death of Pepin in 640, Grimoald became the head of his household, the most powerful in Austrasia. At this time, Radulf, Duke of Thuringia, rebelled against Sigebert III, king of Austrasia. Grimoald participated in the ensuing expedition against the insurrection, but it was a failure. Nevertheless, Grimoald succeeded in saving the life of the king and became his close friend
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Gertrude Of Nivelles
Gertrude of Nivelles, O.S.B. (also spelled Geretrude, Geretrudis, Gertrud; c. 626[1] – March 17, 659) was a 7th-century abbess who, with her mother Itta, founded the Abbey of Nivelles
Nivelles
located in present-day Belgium.Contents1 Life1.1 Family and childhood1.1.1 Marriage proposal 1.1.2 After her father's death1.2 Foundress 1.3 Monastic life 1.4 Death of Foillan 1.5 Miracles1.5.1 Miraculous vision 1.5.2 Salvation of the sailors1.6 Appointment of Wulfetrud 1.7 Death2 Veneration 3 Gertrude of Nivelles
Nivelles
in Literature3.1 Vita Sanctae Geretrudis and the Additamentum Nivialense de Fuilano 3.2 Source integrity4 Relationship with St. Arnulf of Metz 5 Recent popular cult 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksLife[edit] Family and childhood[edit] The early history of Gertrude's family is not well documented
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