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Pili Pili
Piri piri
Piri piri
(/ˌpɪri ˈpɪri/ PIRR-ee-PIRR-ee; also spelled peri peri or pili pili, also called bird's eye chili), is a cultivar of Capsicum chinense, a chili pepper that grows both wild and as a crop. It is a small member of the genus Capsicum. It is indigenous to southeastern Africa and was spread by the Portuguese to their Indian territories of Gujarat
Gujarat
and Goa.Contents1 Etymology 2 Plant characteristics 3 Cultivation 4 Piri piri
Piri piri
sauce 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] Piri piri
Piri piri
is Swahili for "pepper pepper". Other romanizations include pili pili in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Democratic Republic of the Congo
or peri peri in Malawi, deriving from the various pronunciations of the word in parts of Bantu languages-speaking Africa
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Bishop's Crown
The bishop's crown, Christmas bell, or joker's hat, is a pepper, a cultivar of the species Capsicum baccatum
Capsicum baccatum
var. pendulum.[1] It is named for its distinct three-sided shape resembling a bishop's crown.[2] Although this variety can be found in Barbados,[2] and is Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum, [1] it may be indigenous to South America. Today, it is also grown in Europe, possibly brought there from Brazil by the Portuguese sometime in the 18th century.[1] The actual plant is relatively large, being three to four feet in height. It produces 30 to 50 peculiar, three or four flat-winged, wrinkled pods. These somewhat flying saucer-like peppers grow to approximately 1.5 inches wide.[1] The flesh inside each pepper is thin, yet crisp
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Dundicut
Dundicut
Dundicut
peppers are a variety of small, round (approx. 1/2" to 1" diameter), dark red chili peppers grown in Sindh
Sindh
Pakistan. They are a cultivar of either Capsicum frutescens
Capsicum frutescens
or Capsicum annuum[1] and are also known in Asia as lal mirch.Sold dried, Dundicuts are similar in size and flavor to Scotch bonnet
Scotch bonnet
peppers, but are not as hot, and are of a different species. According to a major U.S. commercial spice vendor, dundicuts are "quite hot, with a full-bodied, complex flavor. A single crushed pepper will add heat and flavor to a dish for two." The heat rating for Dundicuts, as measured in Scoville Units, ranges from as low as 30,000 to a high of 65,000.[2] Dundicuts are a common ingredient in parrot food.[3][4] References[edit]^ "Chile Pepper Varieties". theepicentre.com
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Capsicum Annuum
Capsicum
Capsicum
annuum is a species of the plant genus Capsicum
Capsicum
(peppers) native to southern North America
North America
and northern South America.[1][4] This species is the most common and extensively cultivated of the five domesticated capsicums. The species encompasses a wide variety of shapes and sizes of peppers, both mild and hot, such as bell peppers, jalapeños, and cayenne peppers. Cultivars are descended from the wild American bird pepper still found in warmer regions of the Americas.[5] In the past some woody forms of this species have been called C. frutescens, but the features that were used to distinguish those forms appear in many populations of C. annuum and it is not a consistently recognizable feature in C. frutescens species.[6] Moreover, crosses between C. annuum and C
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Aleppo Pepper
The Aleppo
Aleppo
pepper (Arabic: فلفل حلبي‎ / ALA-LC: fulful Ḥalabī) is a variety of Capsicum annuum
Capsicum annuum
used as a spice, particularly in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisine. Also known as the Halaby pepper,[1] it starts as pods, which ripen to a burgundy color, and then are semi-dried, de-seeded, then crushed or coarsely ground.[2] The pepper flakes are known in Turkey
Turkey
as pul biber, and in Armenia as Haleb biber. The pepper is named after Aleppo, a long-inhabited city along the Silk Road
Silk Road
in northern Syria, and is grown in Syria
Syria
and Turkey. Although a common condiment, its use in the United States outside Armenian, Syrian and Turkish immigrant communities was rare until the 20th century, with one source (Los Angeles magazine) dating its rise in use among the broader U.S
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Banana Pepper
The banana pepper (also known as the yellow wax pepper or banana chili) is a medium-sized member of the chili pepper family that has a mild, tangy taste. While typically bright yellow, it is possible for them to change to green, red, or orange as they ripen. It is often pickled, stuffed or used as a raw ingredient in foods. It is a cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum. Its flavor is not very hot (0–500 Scoville units) and, as is the case with most peppers, its heat depends on the maturity of the pepper, with the ripest being sweeter than younger ones.Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Cultivation 3 Nutritional information 4 Serving styles 5 See also 6 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] Banana
Banana
pepper plantA mature fruit will be about 2–3 inches (5–8 cm) in length and have a curved shape and yellowish color similar to a banana, giving rise to the fruit's common name
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Bell Pepper
The bell pepper (also known as sweet pepper, pepper or capsicum) /ˈkæpsɪkəm/[1] is a cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum.[2] Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colors, including red, yellow, orange, green, white, and purple. Bell peppers are sometimes grouped with less pungent pepper varieties as "sweet peppers". Peppers are native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Pepper seeds were imported to Spain in 1493, and from there, spread to Europe and Asia. China
China
is the world's largest pepper producer. Preferred growing conditions for bell peppers include warm, moist soil in a temperate range of 21 to 29 °C (70 to 84 °F).[3]Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Colors 3 Nutritional value 4 Production 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] The misleading name "pepper" was given by Europeans when Christopher Columbus brought the plant back to Europe
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Cascabel Chili
The cascabel chili (little bell), also known as the rattle chili, is one of the Mirasol cultivars of the species Capsicum annuum. The 'rattle' and 'bell' designations describe the tendency of loose seeds to rattle inside a dried cascabel when shaken.[1] Fresh cascabel, which is 2–3 cm in diameter, is also known by the alias bola chili or chile bola (Spanish for ball chili). The pigmentation of the fresh chilis blends from green to red; when dried, the color darkens. Farmers cultivate cascabel in several states throughout Mexico, including Coahuila, Durango, Guerrero, and Jalisco.[2] See also[edit]List of Capsicum cultivarsReferences[edit]^ "Cascabel chile pepper database". Thechileman.org. Retrieved 2012-10-12.  ^ "Cascabel Chiles". Gourmetsleuth.com. Retrieved 2012-10-12. v t eCapsicum cultivarsC. annuum var
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Cayenne Pepper
The cayenne pepper is a type of Capsicum
Capsicum
annuum. It is usually a moderately hot chili pepper used to flavor dishes. Cayenne
Cayenne
peppers are a group of long, tapering, 10 to 25cm long, generally skinny, mostly red colored peppers, often with a curved tip and somewhat rippled skin, which hang from the bush as opposed to growing upright. Most varieties are generally rated at 30,000 to 50,000 Scoville units.[1] The fruits are generally dried and ground to make the powdered spice of the same name, although cayenne powder may be a blend of different types of peppers, quite often not containing cayenne peppers, and may or may not contain the seeds.[2] Cayenne
Cayenne
is used in cooking spicy dishes either as a powder or in its whole form
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Cheongyang Chili Pepper
Cheongyang chili pepper
Cheongyang chili pepper
is a medium-sized chilli cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum, with intensity of 10,000 Scoville heat units.[1] The chilli is a local speciality of Cheongyang County
Cheongyang County
in South Korea.[2] However, it was named after Cheongsong and Yeongyang Counties when developed by Dr Yoo Il-Woong, by hybridizing local Jejudo
Jejudo
chilli with Thai chilli.[3] References[edit]^ Crawford, Matthew C. (5 September 2014). "Hot pepper town swept by heat wave". The Korea Herald. Retrieved 9 January 2017.  ^ "Chili pepper". cheongyang.go.kr. Cheongyang County. Retrieved 9 January 2017.  ^ 이, 진우 (27 February 2006). "고추품종개발 권위자 유일웅 홍초원 고추연구소 소장". The Financial News (in Korean). Retrieved 25 December 2011. v t eCapsicum cultivarsC. annuum var
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Chilaca
The pasilla chile or chile negro is the dried form of the chilaca chili pepper,[1] a long and narrow member of species Capsicum annuum. Named for its dark, wrinkled skin and pronounced pah-SEE-yah (literally "little raisin"),[2] it is a mild to medium-hot, rich-flavored chile. As dried, it is generally 6 to 8 in (15 to 20 cm) long and 1.0 to 1.5 in (2.5 to 4 cm) in diameter. The fresh narrow chilaca can measure up to 9.0 in (22 cm) long and often has a twisted shape, which is seldom apparent after drying. It turns from dark green to dark brown when fully mature.[3] In the United States, producers and grocers often incorrectly use "pasilla" to describe the poblano, a different, wider variety of pepper, the dried form of which is called an ancho.[4][5]Contents1 Use 2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingUse[edit] Pasilla
Pasilla
are used especially in sauces
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Cubanelle
The Cubanelle, also known as "Cuban pepper" and "Italian frying pepper",[1] is a variety of sweet pepper of the species Capsicum annuum. When unripe, it is light yellowish-green in color, but will turn bright red if allowed to ripen. Compared to bell peppers it has thinner flesh, is longer, and has a slightly more wrinkled appearance. It is used extensively in the cuisine of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
and Italy.[citation needed] Cubanelle
Cubanelle
peppers generally measure between a 100 and a 1000 on the Scoville scale.[2] Most of the cubanelle pepper imports come from the Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic
(where it is called ají cubanela), which has, of late, been the main exporter of this cultivar.[citation needed] See also[edit]List of Capsicum cultivarsReferences[edit]^ " Cubanelle
Cubanelle
Pepper: Simmering Sweet - PepperScale". PepperScale. 2014-11-02
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Chile De árbol
The Chile de árbol
Chile de árbol
(Spanish for tree chili) is a small and potent Mexican chili pepper also known as bird's beak chile and rat's tail chile. These chilis are about 5 to 7.5 cm (2.0 to 3.0 in) long, and 0.65 to 1 cm (0.26 to 0.39 in) in diameter. Their heat index is between 15,000 - 30,000 Scoville units. The peppers start out green and turn a bright red color as they mature.[1] Chile de árbol peppers can be found fresh, dried, or powdered.[2] As dried chiles, they are often used to decorate wreaths because they do not lose their red color after dehydration.Outdoor grown Chile de árbol
Chile de árbol
peppersSince they are largely for decorative and garnishing purposes, they are readily substituted in cooking
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Espelette Pepper
The Espelette
Espelette
pepper (French: Piment d' Espelette
Espelette
French pronunciation: ​[pi.mɑ̃ dɛs.pə.lɛt] ; Basque: Ezpeletako biperra) is a variety of Capsicum annuum
Capsicum annuum
that is cultivated in the French commune of Espelette, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, traditionally the northern territory of the Basque people.[1] On 1 June 2000, it was classified as an AOC product and was confirmed as an APO product on 22 August 2002. Chili pepper, originating in Central and South America, was introduced into France during the 16th century. After first being used medicinally, it became popular as a condiment and for the conservation of meats
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Malagueta Pepper
Malagueta pepper
Malagueta pepper
(Portuguese pronunciation: [mɐlɐˈɣeːtɐ]), a kind of Capsicum
Capsicum
frutescens,[1] is a type of chili widely used in Brazil, Portugal, and Mozambique but also used throughout the Caribbean. It is heavily used in the Bahia
Bahia
state of Brazil. It apparently gets its name from the unrelated melegueta pepper from West Africa (Zingiberaceae). It is a small, tapered, green pepper that turns red as it matures at about 5 cm (2 in) in length. It has a range of 60,000 to 100,000 Scoville units. Two sizes are seen in markets, which sometimes have different names: the smaller ones are called malaguetinha in Brazil
Brazil
and piri piri in Portugal and Mozambique, and the larger ones are called malagueta in Brazil
Brazil
and Portugal
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Facing Heaven Pepper
The facing heaven pepper ( Capsicum annuum
Capsicum annuum
var. conoides ‘Chao Tian Jiao’; Chinese name: 朝天椒; pinyin: cháotiānjiāo, also known as 指天椒; pinyin: zhǐtiānjiāo meaning 'skyward-pointing chili pepper') or Heaven Chile, is a cone-shaped, medium-hot chili pepper, between 3 and 6 cm in length, 1 to 2 cm in diameter at the base, and with very thin skin. A cultivar commonly used in Sichuan cuisine, it is called the facing heaven pepper because the pepper grows with the fruit pointing upwards, rather than downwards, as is normal in other pepper plants. The plant's upright growing habit is typical of "ornamental" peppers. Because of its attractive appearance, the dried chili is often added to dishes whole
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