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Pierre-Esprit Radisson
Pierre-Esprit Radisson
Pierre-Esprit Radisson
(1636/1640–1710) was a French fur trader and explorer. He is often linked to his brother-in-law Médard des Groseilliers. The decision of Radisson and Groseilliers to enter the English service led to the formation of the Hudson's Bay Company
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Pierre De Voyer D'Argenson, Vicomte De Mouzay
Pierre de Voyer d'Argenson, Vicomte de Mouzay (1625 – probably in 1709) was the French governor of New France from 1658 to 1661.[1] Biography[edit] He was a son of the diplomat René de Voyer de Paulmy d'Argenson. He came of a noble family of Touraine, and although originally intended for the church, distinguished himself in several military engagements.[2] He received his commission as governor of Canada on January 27, 1657, arriving in Quebec in 1658. Under his administration, Canada was occupied in repelling incursions from the Iroquois, and was torn by internal quarrels. He made some progress in exploring the region on Hudson Bay and beyond Lake Superior.[3] Notes[edit]New France portal^ Mathieu 1979. ^  Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pierre de Voyer d'Argenson". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.  ^ Wilson & Fiske 1900.References[edit]Mathieu, Jacques (1979) [1969]. "Marc-Pierre de Voyer de Paulmy d'Argenson". In Hayne, David
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Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organisations such as cities (with municipal charters) or universities and learned societies. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and letters of appointment, as they have perpetual effect. Typically, a Royal Charter is produced as a high-quality work of calligraphy on vellum. The British monarchy has issued over 980 royal charters.[1] Of these about 750 remain in existence. The earliest was to the town of Tain
Tain
in 1066, making it the oldest Royal Burgh in Scotland, followed by the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
in 1231
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John Abraham (politician)
John Abraham (fl. 1672 – 1689) was a governor of the now abandoned Hudson's Bay Company
Hudson's Bay Company
settlement at Port Nelson (or Fort
Fort
Nelson) on Hudson Bay, located in the northern part of the modern province of Manitoba. Biography[edit] Immediately after joining the HBC in 1672, Abraham was sent to Hudson Bay, where he served under Governor
Governor
Charles Bayly until 1678. In 1679, possibly as a result of Abraham's accusations of mismanagement, Bayly was recalled to London
London
and replaced by John Nixon
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The Huron Feast Of The Dead
The Huron Feast of the Dead was a mortuary custom of the Wyandot people of what is today central Ontario, Canada, which involved the disinterment of deceased relatives from their initial individual graves followed by their reburial in a final communal grave. A time for both mourning and celebration, the custom became spiritually and culturally significant. Early in the custom's development, as whole villages moved to a new location, other Wyandot would travel to join them in arranging mass reburials of their dead, who were transported to the new location. The people would take dead bodies out of their first graves and clean the remains in preparation for reburial in a new location. Customs evolved over the centuries as populations migrated and increased. They continued to follow traditional beliefs about the afterlife. The arrival of Europeans added new aspects to the process. The Huron adopted a practice of exchanging material gifts as a central part of these festivals
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
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Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Thirteen Colonies
The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America
North America
founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States
United States
of America. The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada and the Caribbean, as well as East and West Florida. In the 18th century, the British government operated its colonies under a policy of mercantilism, in which the central government administered its possessions for the economic benefit of the mother country
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Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
(Inuktitut: Kangiqsualuk ilua,[2] French: baie d'Hudson) (sometimes called Hudson's Bay, usually historically) is a large body of saltwater in northeastern Canada
Canada
with a surface area of 1,230,000 km2 (470,000 sq mi). It drains a very large area, about 3,861,400 km2 (1,490,900 sq mi),[3] that includes parts of southeastern Nunavut, Saskatchewan, Alberta, most of Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec
Quebec
and parts of North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, and Montana. Hudson Bay's southern arm is called James Bay. The Eastern Cree
Cree
name for Hudson and James Bay
James Bay
is Wînipekw (Southern dialect) or Wînipâkw (Northern dialect), meaning muddy or brackish water
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Charles II Of England
Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685)[c] was king of England, Scotland and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death. Charles II's father, Charles I, was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. Although the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands
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Rupert's Land
Flag of the Hudson's Bay CompanyRupert's Land, showing location of York FactoryGovernment Trading companyMonarch •  1670–1685 (first) Charles II •  1837–1870 (last) VictoriaHBC Governor •  1670–1682 (first) Prince Rupert of the Rhine •  1870 (last) Stafford NorthcoteHistorical era Age of Discovery •  Established 1670 •  Disestablished July 15, 1870Today part of  Canada  United StatesRupert's Land, or Prince Rupert's Land, was a territory in British North America
North America
comprising the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage basin, a territory in which a commercial monopoly was operated by the Hudson's Bay Company for 200 years from 1670 to 1870. The area once known as Rupert's Land is now mainly a part of Canada, but a small portion is now in the United States
United States
of America
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Hayes River
The Hayes River
Hayes River
is a river in Northern Region, Manitoba, Canada
Canada
that flows from Molson Lake to Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
at York Factory.[1] It was an historically important river in the development of Canada, and is today a Canadian Heritage River and the longest naturally flowing river in Manitoba.[2]Contents1 Course 2 Watershed 3 History 4 Natural history 5 Economy 6 Tributaries 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksCourse[edit] The river begins at an elevation of 221 metres (725 ft) at Molson Lake which is about 90 kilometres (56 mi) northeast of the northern tip of Lake Winnipeg. A tributary of Molson Lake, Paimusk Creek, begins less than 3 kilometres (2 mi) east of the Nelson River. It leaves Molson Lake and flows north and northeast to Robinson Lake about 16 kilometres (10 mi) northeast
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Sir John Robinson, 1st Baronet, Of London
Sir John Robinson, 1st Baronet, of London
Sir John Robinson, 1st Baronet, of London
(10 January 1615 – February 1680) was an English merchant and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1660 and 1667. He was Lord Mayor of London
Lord Mayor of London
in 1662. Robinson was the son of Archdeacon William Robinson, who was half-brother of Archbishop William Laud
William Laud
and nephew of Sir William Webbe who was Lord Mayor in 1591.[1] He was a city of London merchant and a member of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers. He was one of the court assistants with the Levant Company from 1651 to 1653 and from 1655 to 1656. On 18 December 1655 he was elected an alderman of the City of London for Dowgate
Dowgate
ward. He was Master of the Clothworkers Company in 1656. He was Sheriff of London from 1657 to 1658
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Bawdy House Riots Of 1668
The 1668 Bawdy House Riots (also called the Messenger riots after rioter Peter Messenger) took place in 17th-century London
London
over several days in March during Easter Week, 1668.[1] They were sparked by Dissenters who resented the King's proclamation against conventicles (private lay worship)[2] while turning a blind eye to the equally illegal brothels.[3] Thousands of young men besieged and demolished brothels throughout the East End, assaulting the prostitutes and looting the properties.[4] As the historian Tim Harris describes it:"The riots broke out on Easter Monday, 23 March 1668, when a group attacked bawdy houses in Poplar. The next day crowds of about 500 pulled 'down similar establishments in Moorfields, East Smithfield, St Leonard's, Shoreditch, and also St Andrew's, Holborn, the main bawdy house districts of London
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Jean II D'Estrées
Jean, Comte d'Estrées, (3 November 1624 in Solothurn, Switzerland
Switzerland
– 19 May 1707 in Paris), was a Marshal of France, and an important naval commander of Louis XIV. He was born to a noble family from Picardie. His aunt was Gabrielle d'Estrées, lover of King Henry IV of France. Contents1 In the Army 2 In the Navy 3 Las Aves Disaster 4 Family 5 References 6 External linksIn the Army[edit] Like his father François Annibal d'Estrées, also Marshal of France, Jean pursued a military career from a very young age. He became a colonel at 23, a maréchal de camp at 25 and a lieutenant general at 33. He fought in the Battle of Lens
Battle of Lens
(1648) under the grand Condé. After that he fought under Turenne
Turenne
in Lorraine in 1652 - 1653 and then in Flanders
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Franco-Dutch War
Peace among France, the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
and England:Treaty of Westminster (1674) Treaty of Nijmegen
Treaty of Nijmegen
(1678–1679)Territorial changes
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