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Physical Therapist
Physical therapy
Physical therapy
(PT), also known as physiotherapy, is one of the allied health professions that, by using mechanical force and movements (bio-mechanics or kinesiology), manual therapy, exercise therapy and electrotherapy, remediates impairments and promotes mobility and function. Physical therapy
Physical therapy
is used to improve a patient's quality of life through examination, diagnosis, prognosis and physical intervention. It is performed by physical therapists (known as physiotherapists in many countries). In addition to clinical practice, other activities encompassed in the physical therapy profession include research, education, consultation and administration
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Physical Therapy (journal)
The Physical Therapy is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering research about physical therapy. It is the official journal of the American Physical Therapy Association
American Physical Therapy Association
and was established in 1921. [1] According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2015 impact factor of 2.799.[2] References[edit]^ "Physical therapy". NLM Catalog. National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved 2016-05-30.  ^ "Physical Therapy". 2015 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2017. External links[edit]Official websiteThis article about a medical journal is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
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Shoulder Dislocation
A dislocated shoulder is when the head of the humerus is out of the shoulder joint.[2] Symptoms include shoulder pain and instability.[2] Complications may include a Bankart lesion, Hill-Sachs lesion, rotator cuff tear, or injury to the axillary nerve.[1] A shoulder dislocation often occurs as a result of a fall onto an outstretched arm or onto the shoulder.[3] Diagnosis is typically based on symptoms and confirmed by X-rays.[2] They are classified as anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior with most being anterior.[2][1] Treatment is by shoulder reduction which may be accomplished by a number of techniques including traction-countertraction, external rotation, scapular manipulation, and the Stimson technique.[1] After reduction X-rays are recommended for verification.[1] The arm may than be placed in a sling for a few weeks.[2] Surgery may be recommended in those with recurrent dislocations.[2] About 1.7% of people have a shoulder dislocation at one point in time.[3] In the United
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Outpatient Clinic
A clinic (or outpatient clinic or ambulatory care clinic) is a healthcare facility that is primarily focused on the care of outpatients. Clinics can be privately operated or publicly managed and funded. They typically cover the primary healthcare needs of populations in local communities, in contrast to larger hospitals which offer specialised treatments and admit inpatients for overnight stays. Most commonly, the word clinic in English refers to a general medical practice, run by one or more general practitioners, but it can also mean a specialist clinic
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Rehabilitation Hospital
Rehabilitation hospitals, also referred to as inpatient rehabilitation hospitals, are devoted to the rehabilitation of patients with various neurological, musculo-skeletal, orthopedic and other medical conditions following stabilisation of their acute medical issues. The industry is largely made up by independent hospitals that operate these facilities within acute care hospitals. There are also inpatient rehabilitation hospitals that offer this service in a hospital-like setting, but separate from acute care facilities. Most inpatient rehabilitation facilities are located within hospitals
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Schools
A school is an institution designed to provide learning spaces and learning environments for the teaching of students (or "pupils") under the direction of teachers. Most countries have systems of formal education, which is commonly compulsory.[citation needed] In these systems, students progress through a series of schools. The names for these schools vary by country (discussed in the Regional section below) but generally include primary school for young children and secondary school for teenagers who have completed primary education. An institution where higher education is taught, is commonly called a university college or university. In addition to these core schools, students in a given country may also attend schools before and after primary and secondary education. Kindergarten
Kindergarten
or pre-school provide some schooling to very young children (typically ages 3–5)
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Hospices
Hospice
Hospice
care is a type of care and philosophy of care that focuses on the palliation of a chronically ill, terminally ill or seriously ill patient's pain and symptoms, and attending to their emotional and spiritual needs. In Western society, the concept of hospice has been evolving in Europe since the 11th century. Then, and for centuries thereafter in Roman Catholic tradition, hospices were places of hospitality for the sick, wounded, or dying, as well as those for travelers and pilgrims
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Health Club
A health club (also known as a fitness club, fitness centre, health spa, and commonly referred to as a gym) is a place that houses exercise equipment for the purpose of physical exercise.Contents1 Facilities and services1.1 Main workout area 1.2 Cardio area/exercise theatre 1.3 Group exercise classes 1.4 Sports facilities 1.5 Personal training 1.6 Other services 1.7 Levels of services and offerings 1.8 Types of services in health clubs2 History 3 References 4 External linksFacilities and services[edit] Main workout area[edit] Most health clubs have a main workout area, which primarily consists of free weights including dumbbells and barbells and the stands and benches used with these items and exercise machines, which use gears, cables and other mechanisms to guide the user's exercise. This area often includes mirrors so that exercisers can monitor and maintain correct posture during their workout
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Sports Training
Practice or practise is the act of rehearsing a behavior over and over, or engaging in an activity again and again, for the purpose of improving or mastering it, as in the phrase "practise makes perfect". Sports teams practise to prepare for actual games. Playing a musical instrument well takes a lot of practise. It is a method of learning and of acquiring experience. The word derives from the Greek "πρακτική" (praktike), feminine of "πρακτικός" (praktikos), "fit for or concerned with action, practical",[1] and that from the verb "πράσσω" (prasso), "to achieve, bring about, effect, accomplish".[2] In American English, practise is used as both a noun and a verb, but in British English, there is a distinction between practice, used as a noun, and practise, used as a verb (see spelling differences). Sessions scheduled for the purpose of rehearsing and performance improvement are called practises. They are engaged in by sports teams, bands, individuals, etc
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Independent Medical Examination
An independent medical examination (IME) occurs when a doctor/physical therapist/chiropractor/psychologist/neuropsychologist who has not previously been involved in a person’s care examines an individual. There is no doctor/therapist-patient relationship. IMEs may be conducted to determine the cause, extent and medical treatment of a work-related or other injury where liability is at issue; whether an individual has reached maximum benefit from treatment; and whether any permanent impairment remains after treatment. An IME may be conducted at the behest of an employer or an insurance carrier to obtain an independent opinion of the clinical status of the individual. Workers' compensation
Workers' compensation
insurance carriers, auto insurance carriers, and self-insured employers have a legal right to this request
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Shoulder
The human shoulder is made up of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone) as well as associated muscles, ligaments and tendons. The articulations between the bones of the shoulder make up the shoulder joints. The shoulder joint also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the major joint of the shoulder, but can more broadly include the acromioclavicular joint. In human anatomy, the shoulder joint comprises the part of the body where the humerus attaches to the scapula, the head sitting in the glenoid cavity.[1] The shoulder is the group of structures in the region of the joint.[2] The shoulder joint (also known as the glenohumeral joint) is the main joint of the shoulder. It is a ball and socket joint that allows the arm to rotate in a circular fashion or to hinge out and up away from the body
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Humerus Fracture
A humerus fracture is a break of the humerus bone in the upper arm. Fractures of the humerus may be classified by the location into proximal region, which is near the shoulder, the middle region or shaft, and the distal region, which is near the elbow. These locations can further be divided based on the extent of the fracture and the specific areas of each of the three regions affected. Humerus fractures usually occur after physical trauma, falls, excess physical stress, or pathological conditions such as tumors. Falls are the most common cause of proximal and shaft fractures, and those who experience a fracture from a fall usually have an underlying risk factor for bone fracture. Distal fractures occur most frequently in children who attempt to break a fall with an outstretched hand. Symptoms of fracture are pain, swelling, and discoloration of the skin at the site of the fracture. Bruising appears a few days after the fracture
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Humerus
The humerus (/ˈhjuːmərəs/, Plural: humeri) is a long bone in the arm or forelimb that runs from the shoulder to the elbow. It connects the scapula and the two bones of the lower arm, the radius and ulna, and consists of three sections. The humeral upper extremity consists of a rounded head, a narrow neck, and two short processes (tubercles, sometimes called tuberosities). The body is cylindrical in its upper portion, and more prismatic below. The lower extremity consists of 2 epicondyles, 2 processes (trochlea & capitulum), and 3 fossae (radial fossa, coronoid fossa, and olecranon fossa)
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Pediatrics
Pediatrics
Pediatrics
(also spelled paediatrics or pædiatrics) is the branch of medicine that involves the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The American Academy of Pediatrics
American Academy of Pediatrics
recommends people be under pediatric care up to the age of 21.[1] A medical doctor who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician, or paediatrician. The word pediatrics and its cognates mean "healer of children"; they derive from two Greek words: παῖς (pais "child") and ἰατρός (iatros "doctor, healer")
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Hippocrates
Hippocrates
Hippocrates
of Kos
Kos
(Hippokrátēs ho Kṓos; c. 460 – c. 370 BC), also known as Hippocrates
Hippocrates
II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles
Pericles
(Classical Greece), and is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine. He is often referred to as the "Father of Medicine"[1][2] in recognition of his lasting contributions to the field as the founder of the Hippocratic School of Medicine
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