HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Phylloxera
Grape
Grape
phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae (Fitch 1855); family Phylloxeridae, within the order Hemiptera, bugs); originally described in France as Phylloxera
Phylloxera
vastatrix; equated to the previously described Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, Phylloxera
Phylloxera
vitifoliae; commonly just called phylloxera (/fɪˈlɒksərə/; from Greek φύλλον, leaf, and ξηρόν, dry) is a pest of commercial grapevines worldwide, originally native to eastern North America. These almost microscopic, pale yellow sap-sucking insects, related to aphids, feed on the roots and leaves of grapevines (depending on the phylloxera genetic strain)
[...More...]

"Phylloxera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hectolitre
The litre (SI spelling) or liter (American spelling) (symbols L or l,[1] sometimes abbreviated ltr) is an SI accepted metric system unit of volume equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm3), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm3) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. A cubic decimetre (or litre) occupies a volume of 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm (see figure) and is thus equal to one-thousandth of a cubic metre. The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit. The word litre is derived from an older French unit, the litron, whose name came from Greek — where it was a unit of weight, not volume [2] — via Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres. The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI,[3] although not an SI unit — the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m3)
[...More...]

"Hectolitre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
[...More...]

"Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Toad
List of Anuran families Toad
Toad
is a common name for certain frogs, especially of the family Bufonidae, that are characterized by dry, leathery skin, short legs, and large bumps covering the parotoid glands.[1][2] A distinction between frogs and toads is not made in scientific taxonomy, but is common in popular culture (folk taxonomy), in which toads are associated with drier skin and more terrestrial habitats.[3]Contents1 Biology 2 In human culture 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiology[edit] In scientific taxonomy, toads are found in the families Bufonidae, Bombinatoridae, Discoglossidae, Pelobatidae, Rhinophrynidae, Scaphiopodidae
Scaphiopodidae
and Microhylidae.[4] Usually the largest of the bumps on the skin of a toad are those that cover the parotoid glands
[...More...]

"Toad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Punch (magazine)
Punch; or, The London
London
Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 1850s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. After the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, closing in 1992. It was revived in 1996, but closed again in 2002.Contents1 History 2 Later years2.1 Punch table3 Gallery of selected early covers 4 Contributors4.1 Editors 4.2 Cartoonists 4.3 Authors5 Influence 6 See also 7 Notes 8 Works cited 9 External linksHistory[edit] Punch was founded on 17 July 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells, on an initial investment of £25. It was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon
[...More...]

"Punch (magazine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parthenogenetic
Parthenogenesis
Parthenogenesis
(/ˌpɑːrθɪnoʊˈdʒɛnɪsɪs, -θɪnə-/;[1][2] from the Greek παρθένος parthenos, "virgin", + γένεσις genesis, "creation"[3]) is a natural form of asexual reproduction in which growth and development of embryos occur without fertilization. In animals, parthenogenesis means development of an embryo from an unfertilized egg cell. In plants parthenogenesis is a component process of apomixis. Parthenogenesis
Parthenogenesis
occurs naturally in some plants, some invertebrate animal species (including nematodes, water fleas, some scorpions, aphids, some mites, some bees, some Phasmida
Phasmida
and parasitic wasps) and a few vertebrates (such as some fish,[4] amphibians, reptiles[5][6] and very rarely birds[7])
[...More...]

"Parthenogenetic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Soil
Soil
Soil
is a mixture of organic matter, minerals, gases, liquids, and organisms that together support life. The Earth's body of soil is the pedosphere, which has four important functions: it is a medium for plant growth; it is a means of water storage, supply and purification; it is a modifier of Earth's atmosphere; it is a habitat for organisms; all of which, in turn, modify the soil. Soil
Soil
interfaces with the lithosphere, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, and the biosphere.[1] The term pedolith, used commonly to refer to the soil, literally translates ground stone
[...More...]

"Soil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hybrid (biology)
In biology, a hybrid, or crossbreed, is the result of combining the qualities of two organisms of different breeds, varieties, species or genera through sexual reproduction. Hybrids are not always intermediates between their parents (such as in blending inheritance), but can show hybrid vigour, often growing larger or taller than either parent. The concept of a hybrid is interpreted differently in animal and plant breeding, where there is interest in the individual parentage. In genetics, attention is focused on the numbers of chromosomes. In taxonomy, a key question is how closely related the parent species are. Species
Species
are reproductively isolated by strong barriers to hybridisation, which include morphological differences, differing times of fertility, mating behaviors and cues, and physiological rejection of sperm cells or the developing embryo. Some act before fertilization and others after it
[...More...]

"Hybrid (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Schist
Schist
Schist
(pronounced /ʃɪst/ SHIST) is a medium-grade metamorphic rock[1] with medium to large, flat, sheet-like grains in a preferred orientation (nearby grains are roughly parallel). It is defined by having more than 50% platy and elongated minerals,[2] often finely interleaved with quartz and feldspar.[3] These lamellar (flat, planar) minerals include micas, chlorite, talc, hornblende, graphite, and others. Quartz
Quartz
often occurs in drawn-out grains to such an extent that a particular form called quartz schist is produced. Schist
Schist
is often garnetiferous. Schist
Schist
forms at a higher temperature and has larger grains than phyllite.[4] Geological foliation (metamorphic arrangement in layers) with medium to large grained flakes in a preferred sheetlike orientation is called schistosity.[4] The names of various schists are derived from their mineral constituents
[...More...]

"Schist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vitis Aestivalis
Vitis
Vitis
aestivalis, the summer grape,[1] or pigeon grape[2] is a species of grape native to eastern North America
North America
from southern Ontario
Ontario
east to Maine, west to Oklahoma, and south to Florida
Florida
and Texas.[3][4] It is a vigorous vine, growing to 10 m or more high in trees. The leaves are 7–20 cm long, suborbicular, and usually a little broader than long; they are variable in shape, from unlobed to deeply three- or five-lobed, green above, and densely hairy below. The flowers are produced at every 3rd node[2] in a dense panicle 5–15 cm long. The fruit is a small grape 5–14 mm diameter, dark purple or black in color.[5] It is the official state grape of Missouri.[6] Summer grape prefers a drier upland habitat.[2] The four varieties are:[3]V. a. var. aestivalis V. a. var. bicolor Deam (syn. var
[...More...]

"Vitis Aestivalis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Powdery (mildew)
Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew
is a fungal disease that affects a wide range of plants. Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew
diseases are caused by many different species of fungi in the order Erysiphales, with Podosphaera xanthii
Podosphaera xanthii
(a.k.a. Sphaerotheca fuliginea) being the most commonly reported cause.[1] Erysiphe cichoracearum
Erysiphe cichoracearum
was formerly reported to be the primary causal organism throughout most of the world.[1][2] Powdery mildew
Powdery mildew
is one of the easier plant diseases to identify, as its symptoms are quite distinctive. Infected plants display white powdery spots on the leaves and stems. The lower leaves are the most affected, but the mildew can appear on any above-ground part of the plant
[...More...]

"Powdery (mildew)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aroma
An odor, odour or fragrance is caused by one or more volatilized chemical compounds, generally at a very low concentration, that humans or other animals perceive by the sense of olfaction. Odors are also commonly called scents, which can refer to both pleasant and unpleasant odors. The terms fragrance and aroma are used primarily by the food and cosmetic industry to describe a pleasant odor, and are sometimes used to refer to perfumes, and to describe floral scent. In contrast, malodor, stench, reek, and stink are used specifically to describe unpleasant odor. The term smell (in its noun form) is used for both pleasant and unpleasant odors. In the United Kingdom, odour refers to scents in general
[...More...]

"Aroma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
[...More...]

"European Union" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gall
Galls or cecidia are a kind of swelling growth on the external tissues of plants or animals. Plant
Plant
galls are abnormal outgrowths[1] of plant tissues, similar to benign tumors or warts in animals. They can be caused by various parasites, from fungi and bacteria, to insects and mites. Plant
Plant
galls are often highly organized structures and because of this the cause of the gall can often be determined without the actual agent being identified. This applies particularly to some insect and mite plant galls
[...More...]

"Gall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nymph (biology)
In biology, a nymph is the immature form of some invertebrates, particularly insects, which undergoes gradual metamorphosis (hemimetabolism) before reaching its adult stage.[1] Unlike a typical larva, a nymph's overall form already resembles that of the adult, except for a lack of wings (in winged species). In addition, while a nymph moults it never enters a pupal stage. Instead, the final moult results in an adult insect.[2] Nymphs undergo multiple stages of development called instars. This is the case, for example, in Orthoptera
Orthoptera
(crickets and grasshoppers), Hemiptera
Hemiptera
(cicadas, shield bugs, etc.), mayflies, termites, cockroaches, mantises, stoneflies and Odonata
Odonata
(dragonflies and damselflies).[3] Nymphs of aquatic insects, as in the Odonata, Ephemeroptera, and Plecoptera, are also called naiads, an Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
name for mythological water nymphs
[...More...]

"Nymph (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.