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Philippine Mobile Belt
The Philippine Mobile Belt
Philippine Mobile Belt
is a complex portion of the tectonic boundary between the Eurasian Plate
Eurasian Plate
and the Philippine Sea
Philippine Sea
Plate, comprising most of the country of the Philippines. It includes two subduction zones, the Manila Trench
Manila Trench
to the west and the Philippine Trench to the east, as well as the Philippine Fault System
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Eurasian Plate
The Eurasian Plate
Eurasian Plate
is a tectonic plate which includes most of the continent of Eurasia
Eurasia
(a landmass consisting of the traditional continents of Europe
Europe
and Asia), with the notable exceptions of the Indian subcontinent, the Arabian subcontinent, and the area east of the Chersky Range
Chersky Range
in East Siberia. It also includes oceanic crust extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Mid-Atlantic Ridge
and northward to the Gakkel Ridge. The eastern side is a boundary with the North American Plate
North American Plate
to the north and a boundary with the Philippine Sea Plate
Philippine Sea Plate
to the south and possibly with the Okhotsk Plate
Okhotsk Plate
and the Amurian Plate
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Mount Matutum
Matutum is an active volcano, approximately 5.7 kilometres (3.5 mi) from Acmonan, Tupi, South Cotabato, Philippines.[4][5]Contents1 Location 2 Physical features 3 Eruptions 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLocation[edit] Matutum is located in the province of South Cotabato, on the island of Mindanao, in the south of the Philippines, at geographical coordinates 6°22'N, 125°06.5'E.[2] It is 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) north of Polomolok, and about 30 kilometres (19 mi) north-northwest of General Santos City. Physical features[edit] Matutum is a stratovolcano that rises 2,286 metres (7,500 ft) asl with a base diameter of 25 kilometres (16 mi).[5] It has 2 hot springs, called Acmonan and Linan, 5.7 kilometres (3.5 mi) west-southwest of the volcano. Adjacent volcanic edifices are Landayao, Tampad, and Albulhek, which are all west of the volcano, and Magolo to the north. There is a well-preserved 320-metre (1,050 ft) wide crater at
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Late Miocene
The Late Miocene
Miocene
(also known as Upper Miocene) is a sub-epoch of the Miocene
Miocene
Epoch made up of two stages. The Tortonian and Messinian stages comprise the Late Miocene
Miocene
sub-epoch. The sub-epoch lasted from 11.608 ± 0.005 Ma (million years ago) to 5.332 ± 0.005 Ma. The Late Miocene
Miocene
Period was when the Australian and Central African species, respectively Thylacinus potens
Thylacinus potens
and Amphimachairodus
Amphimachairodus
kabir,[1] lived. References[edit]^ Peignéa, Stéphane; Louis de Bonisa; Andossa Likiusb; Hassane Taïsso Mackayeb; Patrick Vignauda; Michel Bruneta (2005). "A new machairodontine (Carnivora, Felidae) from the Late Miocene
Miocene
hominid locality of TM 266, Toros-Menalla, Chad". Comptes Rendus Palevol. 4 (3): 243–253. doi:10.1016/j.crpv.2004.10.002
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Diorite
Diorite
Diorite
( /ˈdaɪ.əˌraɪt/[1][2]) is an intrusive igneous rock composed principally of the silicate minerals plagioclase feldspar (typically andesine), biotite, hornblende, and/or pyroxene. The chemical composition of diorite is intermediate, between that of mafic gabbro and felsic granite. Diorite
Diorite
is usually grey to dark-grey in colour, but it can also be black or bluish-grey, and frequently has a greenish cast. It is distinguished from gabbro on the basis of the composition of the plagioclase species; the plagioclase in diorite is richer in sodium and poorer in calcium. Diorite
Diorite
may contain small amounts of quartz, microcline, and olivine. Zircon, apatite, titanite, magnetite, ilmenite, and sulfides occur as accessory minerals.[3] Minor amounts of muscovite may also be present. Varieties deficient in hornblende and other dark minerals are called leucodiorite
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Paleogene
The Paleogene (/ˈpæliədʒiːn, ˈpeɪliə-/; also spelled Palaeogene or Palæogene; informally Lower Tertiary or Early Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 43 million years from the end of the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period 66 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the Neogene
Neogene
Period 23.03 Mya
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Neogene
The Neogene
Neogene
( /ˈniːəˌdʒiːn/)[6][7] (informally Upper Tertiary or Late Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 20.45 million years from the end of the Paleogene Period 23.03 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the present Quaternary
Quaternary
Period 2.58 Mya. The Neogene
Neogene
is sub-divided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene
Miocene
and the later Pliocene. Some geologists assert that the Neogene
Neogene
cannot be clearly delineated from the modern geological period, the Quaternary. During this period, mammals and birds continued to evolve into roughly modern forms, while other groups of life remained relatively unchanged. Early hominids, the ancestors of humans, appeared in Africa near the end of the period
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Adakite
Adakites are volcanic rocks of intermediate to felsic composition that have geochemical characteristics of magma thought to have formed by partial melting of altered basalt that is subducted below volcanic arcs.[1] Most magmas derived in subduction zones come from the mantle above the subducting plate when hydrous fluids are released from minerals that break down in the metamorphosed basalt, rise into the mantle, and initiate partial melting. However, Defant and Drummond recognized that when young oceanic crust (less than 25 millions years old) is subducted, adakites are typically produced in the arc. They postulated that when young oceanic crust is subducted it is "warmer" (closer to the mid-ocean ridge where it formed) than crust that is typically subducted
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Surigao City
Surigao City, (Tagalog pronunciation: [surɪ'gaʊ]), officially the City of Surigao, (Filipino: Lungsod ng Surigao; Surigaonon: Siyudad nan Surigao; Cebuano: Dakbayan sa Surigao; Spanish: Ciudad de Surigao), is a 3rd class city and capital of the province of Surigao del Norte, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 154,137 people.[3] Located at the north-easternmost tip of Mindanao, it has a total land area of 245.34 km2 which is roughly 1.4% of Caraga
Caraga
region. The absence of a fort in Surigao belies its significance and sphere of influence during the Spanish period. It was the capital of the expansive province of the same name from 1750 until its dissolution in 1911, covering a third of Mindanao
Mindanao
Island's total land area. It is one of the oldest port towns in Mindanao, founded by Spanish colonizers in 1655
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Davao City
Davao City, officially the City of Davao (Cebuano: Dakbayan sa Dabaw, Filipino: Lungsod ng Dabaw), is a highly urbanized city in the island of Mindanao
Mindanao
in the Philippines. It is the largest city in the Philippines
Philippines
in terms of land area, and the most populous city in the country outside Metro Manila. It is geographically situated in the province of Davao del Sur
Davao del Sur
and grouped under the province by the Philippine Statistics Authority
Philippine Statistics Authority
but being a highly urbanized city, it is governed and administered politically independent from it. The city has a total land area of 2,443.61 km2 (943.48 sq mi), and a population of 1,632,991 people based on the 2015 census
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Pocdol Mountains
The Pocdol Mountains, also known as the Bacon-Manito Volcanic Group are a volcanic group of stratovolcanoes in the Philippines.Contents1 Location 2 Physical features 3 Eruptions 4 Geology 5 Listings 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLocation[edit] The Pocdol Mountains
Pocdol Mountains
form part of the boundary between the provinces of Albay
Albay
and Sorsogon, in Region V, on the island of Luzon, in the Philippines. The group is located south-east of Mayon Volcano, between Albay
Albay
Gulf and Sorsogon
Sorsogon
Bay, at latitude 13.05°N (13°3'0"N), longitude 123.958°E (123°57'30"E). Physical features[edit] The Pocdol Mountains
Pocdol Mountains
have a triangular footprint of about 225 square kilometres (87 sq mi). There are several peaks above 1000 metres in elevation
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Kanlaon
Kanlaon
Kanlaon
(Hiligaynon: Bulkan sang Kanlaon; Cebuano: Bulkan sa Kanlaon; Spanish: Volcán de Canlaon, Malaspina), also spelled as Kanla-on or sometimes Canlaon, is an active stratovolcano on the island of Negros, Philippines. It is the highest point in Negros, as well as the whole Visayas, with an elevation of 2,465 m (8,087 ft) above sea level. The volcano straddles the provinces of Negros Occidental
Negros Occidental
and Negros Oriental, approximately 30 km (19 mi) southeast of Bacolod, the capital and most populous city of Negros Occidental
Negros Occidental
and of the whole island region. It is one of the active volcanoes in the Philippines
Philippines
and part of the Pacific Ring of Fire.Contents1 Physical features 2 Hiking Destination and Trails2.1 Trails & Hiking Markers System 2.2 Hiking Markers Standard on Mt
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Jolo Group Of Volcanoes
Jolo Group is an active group of volcanoes in the island of Jolo in Southern Philippines. The Global Volcanism Program lists Jolo as one of the active volcanoes in the Philippines[1] while the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) collectively list the group as Bud Dajo, one of the cinder cones on the island.Contents1 Location 2 Physical features 3 Volcanic Activity 4 Geology 5 Political 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLocation[edit] Jolo is a volcanic island located 150 kilometres (93 mi) southwest of the southern tip of the Zamboanga Peninsula of Mindanao Island. The island is part of the Sulu Archipelago, in the province of Sulu, located within the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, one of the Regions of the Philippines. Physical features[edit] The figure-eight shaped island is about 60 kilometres (37 mi) at its longest, about 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) at its widest and about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) at the narrowest section
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Sedimentary Basin
Sedimentary basins are regions of Earth
Earth
of long-term subsidence creating accommodation space for infilling by sediments.[1] The subsidence can result from a variety of causes that include: the thinning of underlying crust, sedimentary, volcanic, and tectonic loading, and changes in the thickness or density of adjacent lithosphere.[2] Sedimentary basins occur in diverse geological settings usually associated with plate tectonic activity. Basins are classified structurally in various ways, with a primary classifications distinguishing among basins formed in various plate tectonic regime (divergent, convergent, transform, intraplate), the proximity of the basin to the active plate margins, and whether oceanic, continental or transitional crust underlies the basin.[1][2][3] Basins formed in different plate tectonic regimes vary in their preservation potential
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North Palawan Block
North Palawan Block is a microcontinental block situated in the western Philippines and the southern tip of Manila Trench. The North Palawan block is considered to form the northeastern portion of a much larger area of block faulted and foundered pre-Tertiary continental material which extends throughout the southern part of the South China Sea Basin and includes the Spratley Islands and the Dangerous Grounds area off Borneo (Hamilton, 1979)
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List Of Stratigraphic Formations In The Philippines
The list of well-known geologic formations in the Philippines[1]. Stratigraphic groupings[edit]Ilocos-Central Luzon Basin Luzon Central Cordillera Cagayan Valley Basin Northern Sierra Madre Zambales Range Southern Sierra Madre Southwest Luzon Uplands Southeast Luzon Basin Southeast Luzon Arc (Recent) Southeast Luzon Arc (Ancient) North Palawan Block South Palawan Block Antique Range Iloilo Basin Negros Arc (Ancient) Negros Arc (Recent) Visayan Sea Basin Samar Block Leyte Central Highlands Leyte Gulfs Sulu-Zamboanga Arc Central Mindanao Arc Agusan-Davao Basin Mindanao Pacific Cordillera Daguma Range Cotabato Basin Saranggani Block Pujada Block South China Sea Basin Sulu Sea Basin Celebes Sea Basin Philippine Sea BasinReference(s)[edit]^ Lexicon of Philippine Stratig
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