HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Philippa Foot
Philippa Ruth Foot, FBA (/ˈfɪlɪpə ˈfʊt/; née Bosanquet; 3 October 1920 – 3 October 2010) was a British philosopher, most notable for her works in ethics. She was one of the founders of contemporary virtue ethics, inspired by the ethics of Aristotle. Her later career marked a significant change in view from her work in the 1950s and 1960s, and may be seen as an attempt to modernize Aristotelian ethical theory, to show that it is adaptable to a contemporary world view, and thus, that it could compete with such popular theories as modern deontological and utilitarian ethics. Some of her work was crucial in the re-emergence of normative ethics within analytic philosophy, especially her critique of consequentialism and of non-cognitivism. A familiar example is the continuing discussion of an example of hers referred to as the trolley problem. Foot's approach was influenced by the later work of Wittgenstein, although she rarely dealt explicitly with materials treated by him
[...More...]

"Philippa Foot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

C. L. Stevenson
The emotive meaning of ethical terms TermsInfluencesI. A. Richards, G. E. Moore, Ludwig Wittgenstein, David HumeCharles Leslie Stevenson (June 27, 1908 – March 14, 1979) was an American analytic philosopher best known for his work in ethics and aesthetics.[2] Stevenson was educated at Yale, receiving in 1930 a B.A. in English literature, at Cambridge where in 1933 he was awarded a B.A. in philosophy, and at Harvard, getting his Ph.D. there in 1935.[3] He was a professor at Yale University
Yale University
from 1939 to 1946, but was denied tenure because of his defense of emotivism. He then taught at the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
from 1946 to 1977. He studied in England
England
with Wittgenstein and G. E. Moore. Among his students was Joel Feinberg. He gave the most sophisticated defense of emotivism in the post-war period
[...More...]

"C. L. Stevenson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Candace Vogler
Candace A. Vogler is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Chicago. Vogler received her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh. Her specific fields of interest are ethics, feminism, action theory, and social and political philosophy, as well as sexuality and gender studies. She has special interest in English literature and literary theory, and did doctoral work in cultural studies with emphasis in 20th century French thought. Indeed, in 2000, she became one of two philosophers invited to speak at the English Institute in the seven decades of its history, the other being Stanley Cavell. She works on Karl Marx, Thomas Aquinas, John Stuart Mill, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Elizabeth Anscombe
[...More...]

"Candace Vogler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atheist
Atheism
Atheism
is, in the broadest sense, the absence of belief in the existence of deities.[1][2][3][4] Less broadly, atheism is the rejection of belief that any deities exist.[5][6] In an even narrower sense, atheism is specifically the position that there are no deities.[1][2][7][8] Atheism
Atheism
is contrasted with theism,[9][10] which, in its most general form, is the belief that at least one deity exists.[10][11][12] The etymological root for the word atheism originated before the 5th century BCE from the ancient Greek ἄθεος (atheos), meaning "without god(s)"
[...More...]

"Atheist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oxfam
Oxfam
Oxfam
is a confederation of 20 independent charitable organizations focusing on the alleviation of global poverty, founded in 1942 and led by Oxfam
Oxfam
International.[1] Winnie Byanyima
Winnie Byanyima
has been the executive director of Oxfam
Oxfam
International since 2013.[2] Oxfam
Oxfam
International is based in England
England
at Oxfam
Oxfam
House, John Smith Drive, Oxford.[3] In the 21st century, Oxfam's governance has repeatedly come under criticism
[...More...]

"Oxfam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of California, Los Angeles
The University of California, Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(UCLA) is a public research university in the Westwood district of Los Angeles, United States
[...More...]

"University Of California, Los Angeles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Presidents Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
[...More...]

"List Of Presidents Of The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Common Serjeant Of London
The Common Serjeant of London
Common Serjeant of London
(full title The Serjeant-at- Law
Law
in the Common Hall) is an ancient British legal office, first recorded in 1291, and is the second most senior permanent judge of th
[...More...]

"Common Serjeant Of London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
[...More...]

"British Army" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coldstream Guards
The Coldstream
Coldstream
Guards (COLDM GDS) is a part of the Guards Division,[1] Foot Guards
Foot Guards
regiments of the British Army. It is the oldest regiment in the Regular Army in continuous active service,[2] originating in Coldstream, Scotland in 1650 when General George Monck
George Monck
founded the regiment
[...More...]

"Coldstream Guards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Non-cognitivism
Non-cognitivism is the meta-ethical view that ethical sentences do not express propositions (i.e., statements) and thus cannot be true or false (they are not truth-apt). A noncognitivist denies the cognitivist claim that "moral judgments are capable of being objectively true, because they describe some feature of the world".[1] If moral statements cannot be true, and if one cannot know something that is not true, noncognitivism implies that moral knowledge is impossible.[1] Non-cognitivism entails that non-cognitive attitudes underlie moral discourse and this discourse therefore consists of non-declarative speech acts, although accepting that its surface features may consistently and efficiently work as if moral discourse were cognitive
[...More...]

"Non-cognitivism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Utilitarianism
Utilitarianism
Utilitarianism
is an ethical theory that states that the best action is the one that maximizes utility. "Utility" is defined in various ways, usually in terms of the well-being of sentient entities. Jeremy Bentham, the founder of utilitarianism, described utility as the sum of all pleasure that results from an action, minus the suffering of anyone involved in the action. Utilitarianism
Utilitarianism
is a version of consequentialism, which states that the consequences of any action are the only standard of right and wrong. Unlike other forms of consequentialism, such as egoism, utilitarianism considers the interests of all beings equally. Proponents of utilitarianism have disagreed on a number of points, such as whether actions should be chosen based on their likely results (act utilitarianism) or whether agents should conform to rules that maximize utility (rule utilitarianism)
[...More...]

"Utilitarianism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aristotelianism
Aristotelianism
Aristotelianism
(/ˌærɪstəˈtiːliənɪzəm/ ARR-i-stə-TEE-lee-ə-niz-əm) is a tradition of philosophy that takes its defining inspiration from the work of Aristotle. This school of thought is in the modern sense of philosophy, covering existence, ethics, mind and related subjects. In Aristotle's time, philosophy included natural philosophy, which was replaced by modern science during the Scientific Revolution. The works of Aristotle
Aristotle
were initially defended by the members of the Peripatetic school
Peripatetic school
and later on by the Neoplatonists, who produced many commentaries on Aristotle's writings
[...More...]

"Aristotelianism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
[...More...]

"Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lincolnshire
Coordinates: 53°4′N 0°11′W / 53.067°N 0.183°W / 53.067; -0.183LincolnshireCountyFlagMotto: Land and God Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
in EnglandSovereign state United KingdomCountry EnglandRegion East Midlands Yorkshire and the Humber
[...More...]

"Lincolnshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fellow Of The British Academy
Fellowship of the British Academy
British Academy
(FBA) is an award granted by the British Academy
British Academy
to leading academics for their distinction[1] in the humanities and social sciences.[2] There are three kinds of fellowship[3]Fellows, for scholars resident in the United Kingdom Corresponding Fellows, for scholars not resident in the UK Honorary Fellows, an honorary academic titleThe award of fellowship is evidenced by published work and fellows may use the post-nominal letters: FBA. Examples of fellows include Mary Beard, Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
and Rowan Williams. See also[edit]List of Fellows of the British AcademyReferences[edit]^ "The British Academy
British Academy
welcomes new Fellows for 2015 University of Cambridge". Cam.ac.uk. 2015-07-16. Retrieved 2016-12-10.  ^ "Fellows British Academy"
[...More...]

"Fellow Of The British Academy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.