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Philip Greeley Clapp
Philip Greeley Clapp (August 4, 1888 – April 9, 1954) was an American educator, conductor, pianist, and composer of classical music. He served as Director of the School of Music at the University of Iowa for more than three decades (1919–53), helping to establish that school’s strong reputation in music and in the arts overall. He worked especially hard in advocating that music and the other arts should be an integral part of a liberal arts education, and succeeded in creating strong graduate programs that awarded degrees not just in scholarship and research but also in performance and creation
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University Of Iowa
The University of Iowa
Iowa
(also known as the UI, U of I, UIowa, or simply Iowa[7]) is a flagship[8] public research university in Iowa
Iowa
City, Iowa. Founded in 1847, it is the oldest university in the state. University of Iowa
Iowa
is organized into eleven colleges offering more than 200 areas of study and seven professional degrees.[7] Located on an urban 1,700-acre campus on the banks of the Iowa
Iowa
River, the University of Iowa
Iowa
is classified as a Doctoral University with Highest Research Activity by the Carnegie Classifications.[9] The university is best known for its programs in health care, law, and the fine arts, with programs ranking among the top 25 nationally in those areas.[10][11] The University of Iowa
Iowa
Hospitals and Clinics and the Stead Family Children's Hospital are ranked nationally by U.S
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Boston Symphony Orchestra
The Boston
Boston
Symphony Orchestra
Orchestra
(BSO) is an American orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts. It is one of the five major American symphony orchestras commonly referred to as the "Big Five".[1] Founded in 1881, the BSO plays most of its concerts at Boston's Symphony Hall and in the summer performs at Tanglewood. Andris Nelsons
Andris Nelsons
is the current music director of the BSO
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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John Tyrrell (professor Of Music)
Tyrrell or Tyrell may refer to: PlacesTyrrell, Ohio Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Tyrrell County, North Carolina Tyrrell Sea, prehistoric Hudson Bay Tyrrell Middle School, a secondary school in Wolcott, ConnecticutPeople Tyrell Biggs (born 1960), American boxer Tyrrell (surname)Other Tyrrell Racing, an auto racing team and Formula One constructor Tyrell Corporation, a fictional corporation in the film Blade Runner House Tyrell, in the A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R
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Stanley Sadie
Stanley John Sadie, CBE (/ˈseɪdi/; 30 October 1930 – 21 March 2005) was an influential and prolific British musicologist, music critic, and editor. He was editor of the sixth edition of the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1980), which was published as the first edition of The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians.[1][2][3][4][5][6]Contents1 Career 2 Honours 3 Professional affiliations 4 External links and resources 5 References 6 External linksCareer[edit] Born in Wembley, Sadie was educated at St Paul's School, London, and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he read music under Thurston Dart
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Olin Downes
Edwin Olin Downes, better known as Olin Downes
Olin Downes
(January 27, 1886 – August 22, 1955), was an American music critic, known as "Sibelius's Apostle" for his championship of the music of Jean Sibelius. As critic of The New York Times, he exercised considerable influence on musical opinion, although many of his judgments have not stood the test of time.Contents1 Life and works 2 Publications 3 Notes 4 ReferencesLife and works[edit] Downes was born in Evanston, Illinois, USA.[1] In New York he studied piano at the National Conservatory of Music of America, and in Boston he studied the piano with Carl Baermann and a range of music subjects with Louis Kelterborn (history and analysis), Homer Norris and Clifford Heilman (music theory) and John P
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Karl Muck
Karl Muck
Karl Muck
(October 22, 1859 – March 3, 1940) was a German-born conductor of classical music. He based his activities principally in Europe and mostly in opera. His American career comprised two stints at the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He endured a public outcry in 1917 that questioned whether his loyalties lay with Germany
Germany
or the United States during World War I. Though he was a Swiss citizen, he was arrested and interned in a camp in Georgia from March 1918 until August 1919
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New York Philharmonic
The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,[1] globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra
Orchestra
(NYPO)[2][3][4][5] or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra,[6][7] is a symphony orchestra based in New York City
New York City
in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the "Big Five".[8] The Philharmonic's home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York's Lincoln Center
Lincoln Center
for the Performing Arts.[9] Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the "Big Five" orchestras
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Dimitri Mitropoulos
Dimitri Mitropoulos
Dimitri Mitropoulos
(1 March [O.S. 18 February] 1896[1] – 2 November 1960), was a Greek conductor, pianist, and composer. He received international fame both as a major conductor and composer of the 20th century.Contents1 Life and career1.1 United States 1.2 Work in opera 1.3 Personal life2 Impact on the music profession 3 References 4 ResourcesLife and career[edit] Mitropoulos was born in Athens, the son of Yannis and Angelikē Mitropoulos. His father owned a leather goods shop at 15, St. Mark Street, in downtown Athens. He was musically precocious, demonstrating his abilities at an early age. From the ages of eleven to fourteen, when Mitropoulos was in secondary school, he would host and preside over informal musical gatherings at his house every Saturday afternoon
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Franz Liszt
Franz Liszt
Franz Liszt
(German pronunciation: [ˈfʁants ˈlɪst]; Hungarian: Liszt Ferencz, in modern usage Liszt Ferenc, pronounced [ˈlist ˈfɛrɛnt͡s];[n 1] 22 October 1811 – 31 July 1886) was a prolific 19th-century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary. Liszt gained renown in Europe during the early nineteenth century for his prodigious virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was a friend, musical promoter and benefactor to many composers of his time, including Frédéric Chopin, Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, Robert Schumann, Camille Saint-Saëns, Edvard Grieg, Ole Bull, Joachim Raff, Mikhail Glinka, and Alexander Borodin.[1] As a composer, Liszt was one of the most prominent representatives of the New German School
New German School
(Neudeutsche Schule)
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Claude Debussy
Achille- Claude Debussy
Claude Debussy
(French: [aʃil klod dəbysi];[1] 22 August 1862 – 25 March 1918)[2] was a French composer
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Richard Strauss
Richard Georg Strauss
Strauss
(11 June 1864 – 8 September 1949) was a leading German composer of the late Romantic and early modern eras
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Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler
(German: [ˈmaːlɐ]; 7 July 1860 – 18 May 1911) was an Austro-Bohemian late-Romantic composer, and one of the leading conductors of his generation. As a composer he acted as a bridge between the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 his compositions were rediscovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became one of the most frequently performed and recorded of all composers, a position he has sustained into the 21st century
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