HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Phil Bolger
Philip C. Bolger (December 3, 1927 – May 24, 2009), prolific boat designer, was born and lived in Gloucester, Massachusetts. He began work full-time as a draftsman for boat designers Lindsay Lord and then John Hacker in the early 1950s.The Gloucester Light Dory, one of Bolger's better-known designsBolger's first boat design was a 32-foot (9.75 m) sportfisherman published in the January 1952 issue of Yachting magazine. He subsequently designed more than 668 different boats,[1] from a 114-foot-10-inch (35 m) replica of an eighteenth-century naval warship, the frigate Surprise (ex-Rose), to the 6-foot-5-inch (1.96 m) plywood box-like dinghy Tortoise. Although his designs ranged through the full spectrum of boat types, Bolger tended to favor simplicity over complexity. Many of his hulls are made from sheet materials — typically plywood — and have hard chines
[...More...]

"Phil Bolger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Suicide
Suicide
Suicide
is the act of intentionally causing one's own death.[6] Risk factors include mental disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, personality disorders, and substance abuse, including alcoholism and use of benzodiazepines.[2][4][7] Other suicides are impulsive acts due to stress such as from financial difficulties, troubles with relationships, or from bullying.[2][8] Those who have previously attempted suicide are at higher risk for future attempts.[2]
[...More...]

"Suicide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Draftsman
A drafter, draughtsman (British English) or draftsman, drafting technician ( American English
American English
and Canadian English) is a person who makes detailed technical drawings or plans for machinery, buildings, electronics, infrastructure, sections, etc. Drafters use computer software and manual sketches to convert the designs, plans, and layouts of engineers and architects into a set of technical drawings. Drafters operate as the supporting developers and sketch engineering designs and drawings from preliminary design concepts.Contents1 Overview 2 Specialities 3 Employment and work environment 4 Education and training 5 See also 6 ReferencesOverview[edit] In the past, drafters sat at drawing boards and used pencils, pens, compasses, protractors, triangles, and other drafting devices to prepare a drawing by hand
[...More...]

"Draftsman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trimaran
A trimaran is a multihull boat that comprises a main hull and two smaller outrigger hulls (or "floats") which are attached to the main hull with lateral beams
[...More...]

"Trimaran" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yanmar
Yanmar
Yanmar
Co., Ltd. (ヤンマー株式会社, Yanmā Kabushiki-Gaisha) is a Japanese diesel engine manufacturer founded in Osaka, Japan
Japan
in 1912. Their engines are used in a wide range of applications including seagoing vessels, construction equipment, agricultural equipment and generator sets.Contents1 Company description 2 Company name origin 3 Timeline 4 References 5 External linksCompany description[edit] Yanmar
Yanmar
Corporate Headquarters (Japan) Yanmar
Yanmar
was founded in March 1912 in Osaka
Osaka
Japan[1] by Magokichi Yamaoka.[2][3] The company specializes in diesel engines, and also makes light fishing boats, hulls for ships, tractors, combine harvesters, rice-planting machines, gas heat pumps, snow throwers, transporters, tillers, mini excavators, portable diesel generators Side by Side UTV and Heavy Utility Machinery
[...More...]

"Yanmar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sustainable Fisheries
A conventional idea of a sustainable fishery is that it is one that is harvested at a sustainable rate, where the fish population does not decline over time because of fishing practices
[...More...]

"Sustainable Fisheries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lewis Francis Herreshoff
L. (Lewis) Francis Herreshoff (November 11, 1890 – December 1972), was a boat designer, naval architect, editor and author of books and magazine articles.[1] Early in his career he worked for the Herreshoff Manufacturing and for naval architect Starling Burgess.Contents1 Biography 2 Notable Designs 3 Publications 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] He was born on November 11, 1890 in Bristol, Rhode Island
Bristol, Rhode Island
to Clara Anna DeWolf and Nathanael Greene Herreshoff. After naval service and work for Starling Burgess, in 1926 he became self-employed, designing both racing and cruising sailing yachts, plus many canoes, kayaks and other small craft
[...More...]

"Lewis Francis Herreshoff" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Howard I. Chapelle
Howard Irving Chapelle (February 1, 1901 – June 30, 1975) was an American naval architect, and curator of maritime history at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
In addition, he authored many books and articles on maritime history and marine architecture.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Chapelle was born on February 1, 1901.[1] From 1919, he worked as a marine apprentice and designer for a number of shipbuilders. After 1936, he went into business for himself, and later served as head of the New England
New England
section of the Historic American Merchant Marine Survey, a New Deal
New Deal
project designed to research American naval history and staffed by unemployed marine architects.[2] During World War II, Chapelle served in the United States Army Transportation Corps ship and boatbuilding program, rising to lieutenant colonel
[...More...]

"Howard I. Chapelle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hull Speed
Hull speed or displacement speed is the speed at which the wavelength of the boat's bow wave (in displacement mode) is equal to the boat length. As boat speed increases from rest, the wavelength of the bow wave increases, and usually its crest-to-trough dimension (height) increases as well. When hull speed is reached, a boat in pure displacement mode will appear trapped in a trough behind its very large bow wave. From a technical perspective, at hull speed the bow and stern waves interfere constructively, creating relatively large waves, and thus a relatively large value of wave drag
[...More...]

"Hull Speed" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fishery Protection Squadron
The Fishery Protection Squadron
Fishery Protection Squadron
is a front-line squadron of the Royal Navy with responsibility for patrolling the UK's Extended Fisheries Zone. The squadron, with headquarters at Portsmouth Naval Base, are equipped with four River-class patrol vessels; three are based in the UK, while HMS Clyde is based in the Falkland Islands. The squadron is the oldest front-line squadron in the Royal Navy, and boasts Admiral Lord Nelson
Admiral Lord Nelson
amongst those who have served in it. Originally, the squadron was based on the coast of North America, Iceland
Iceland
and the UK, patrolling much of the North Atlantic
North Atlantic
against French and American incursions. Over the past hundred years it has been slimmed down to follow a more policing-oriented approach, dealing mainly with infringements by civilian fishermen
[...More...]

"Fishery Protection Squadron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lug Sail
The lug sail, or lugsail, is a fore-and-aft, four-cornered sail that is suspended from a spar, called a yard. When raised the sail area overlaps the mast. For "standing lug" rigs, the sail remains on the same side of the mast on both the port and starboard tacks. For "dipping lug" rigs, the sail is lowered partially to be brought around to the leeward side of the mast in order to optimize the efficiency of the sail on both tacks. The lug sail is evolved from the square sail to improve how close the vessel can sail into the wind. Square sails, on the other hand, are symmetrically mounted in front of the mast and are manually angled to catch the wind on opposite tacks
[...More...]

"Lug Sail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lofting
Lofting is a drafting technique (sometimes using mathematical tables) whereby curved lines are generated, to be used in plans for streamlined objects such as aircraft and boats. The lines may be drawn on wood and the wood then cut for advanced woodworking. The technique can be as simple as bending a flexible object, such as a long strip of thin wood or thin plastic, so that it passes over three non-linear points and scribing the resultant curved line, or plotting the line using computers or mathematical tables. Lofting is particularly useful in boat building, when it is used to draw and cut pieces for hulls and keels, which are usually curved, often in three dimensions
[...More...]

"Lofting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Landing Craft
Landing craft
Landing craft
are small and medium seagoing vessels such as boats, and barges, used to convey a landing force (infantry and vehicles) from the sea to the shore during an amphibious assault. The term excludes landing ship which are larger. World War II
World War II
was the high point of the landing craft, with a significant number of different designs produced in large quantities by the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and United States. Because of the need to run up onto a suitable beach, World War II landing craft were flat-bottomed, and many designs had a flat front, often with a lowerable ramp, rather than a normal bow. This made them difficult to control and very uncomfortable in rough seas. The control point (too rudimentary to call a bridge on LCA and similar craft) was normally at the extreme rear of the vessel, as were the engines
[...More...]

"Landing Craft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naval Sea Systems Command
The Naval Sea Systems Command
Naval Sea Systems Command
(NAVSEA) is the largest of the United States Navy's five "systems commands," or materiel (not to be confused with "material") organizations. NAVSEA consists of four shipyards, nine "warfare centers" (two undersea and seven surface), four major shipbuilding locations and the NAVSEA headquarters, located at the Washington Navy Yard, in Washington D.C. NAVSEA's primary objective is to engineer, build, and support the U.S. Navy's fleet of ships and its combat systems
[...More...]

"Naval Sea Systems Command" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leeboard
A leeboard is a lifting foil used by a sailboat, much like a centreboard, but located on the leeward side of the boat. The leeward side is used so that the leeboard is not lifted from the water when the boat heels, or leans under the force of the wind.Contents1 History 2 Current designs 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Naval history of China Leeboards existed in China from at least the eighth century on warships that "held the ships, so that even when wind and wave arise in fury, they are neither driven sideways, nor overturn".[1] Leeboards used to stabilize the junk and to improve its capability to sail upwind, are documented from a book by Li Chuan
[...More...]

"Leeboard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.