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Pharsalus
Farsala
Farsala
(Greek: Φάρσαλα), known in Antiquity as Pharsalos (Ancient Greek: Φάρσαλος, Latin: Pharsalus), is a city in southern Thessaly, in Greece. Farsala
Farsala
is located in the southern part of Larissa
Larissa
regional unit, and is one of its largest towns. Farsala
Farsala
is an economic and agricultural centre of the region. Cotton
Cotton
and livestock are the main agricultural products, and many inhabitants are employed in the production of textile
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Phthia
In Greek mythology Phthia (/ˈθaɪə/; Greek: Φθία or Φθίη Phthía, Phthíē) was a city in ancient Thessaly which was later incorporated into Achaea Phthiotis.[1] Phthia is the home of the Myrmidones, the contingent led by Achilles in the Trojan War. It was founded by Aiakos, grandfather of Achilles, it was the home of his father Peleus, his sea-nymph mother Thetis, and his son Neoptolemus, who reigned as king after the Trojan War. Phthia is referenced in Plato's Crito, where Socrates, in jail and awaiting his execution, relates a dream he has had (43d–44b):[2] "I thought that a beautiful and comely woman dressed in white approached me
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Volos
Volos
Volos
(Greek: Βόλος) is a coastal port city in Thessaly
Thessaly
situated midway on the Greek mainland, about 330 kilometres (205 miles) north of Athens
Athens
and 220 kilometres (137 miles) south of Thessaloniki. It is the capital of the Magnesia regional unit. Volos
Volos
is the only outlet to the sea from Thessaly, the country's largest agricultural region. With a population of 144,449 (2011), it is an important industrial centre, while its port provides a bridge between Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Volos
Volos
is the newest of the Greek port cities, with a large proportion of modern buildings erected following the catastrophic earthquakes of 1955. It includes the municipal units of Volos, Nea Ionia
Ionia
and Iolkos, as well as smaller suburban communities. The economy of the city is based on manufacturing, trade, services and tourism
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Palaiofarsalos Railway Station
Other informationWebsite http://www.ose.gr/en/HistoryOpened 16 June 1886Electrified 25kV ACServicesPreceding station   TrainOSE   Following stationDomokos toward AthensIntercityLarissa toward ThessalonikiTerminusIntercitySofades toward KalampakaLocationStavros, ThessalyLocation within Greece Palaiofarsalos railway station
Palaiofarsalos railway station
(Greek: Σιδηροδρομικός Σταθμός Παλαιοφαρσάλου, Sidirodromikós Stathmós Palaiofarsálou) is a railway station near Farsala
Farsala
in Larissa regional unit, Greece. It is located in the village Stavros, 12km west of Farsala. It is situated at the junction of the main Piraeus–Platy railway and the branch line (el) to Trikala
Trikala
and Kalambaka
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Piraeus–Platy Railway
The railway from Piraeus
Piraeus
to Platy is a 471-kilometre long railway line that connects the Attica conurbation to northern Greece
Greece
and the rest of Europe. It constitutes the longest section of Greece's most important rail connection, that between Athens
Athens
and Thessaloniki. Its northern end is the station of Platy, on the Thessaloniki–Bitola railway. In the south, it connects to the Athens
Athens
Airport–Kiato railway at the Acharnes
Acharnes
Railway Center
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Stavros, Larissa
Stavros (Greek: Σταυρός, before 1927: Δεμερλή - Demerli[2]) is a village in the south of the Larissa
Larissa
regional unit, Greece. It is part of the municipal unit of Enippeas. In 2011 its population was 602. Stavros is located 12 km (7.5 mi) west of Farsala, 28 km (17 mi) east of Karditsa
Karditsa
and 38 km (24 mi) southwest of Larissa. The important railway junction Palaiofarsalos is situated in Stavros. References[edit]^ a b "Απογραφή Πληθυσμού - Κατοικιών 2011. ΜΟΝΙΜΟΣ Πληθυσμός" (in Greek)
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Obverse And Reverse
Obverse and its opposite, reverse, refer to the two flat faces of coins and some other two-sided objects, including paper money, flags, seals, medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art, and printed fabrics. In this usage, obverse means the front face of the object and reverse means the back face. The obverse of a coin is commonly called heads, because it often depicts the head of a prominent person, and the reverse tails. In fields of scholarship outside numismatics, the term front is more commonly used than obverse, while usage of reverse is widespread. The equivalent terms used in codicology, manuscript studies, print studies and publishing are "recto" and "verso".Contents1 Identification 2 Modern coins 3 Specific currencies3.1 Coins of the European Union 3.2 Coins of Japan 3.3 Coins of the United Kingdom 3.4 Coins of the United States4 See also 5 ReferencesIdentification[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Athena
Athena[Notes 2] or Athene,[Notes 3] often given the epithet Pallas,[Notes 4] is the ancient Greek goddess of wisdom, handicraft, and warfare,[1] who was later syncretized with the Roman goddess Minerva.[2] Athena
Athena
was regarded as the patron and protectress of various cities across Greece, particularly the city of Athens, from which she most likely received her name.[3] She is usually shown in art wearing a helmet and holding a spear. Her major symbols include owls, olive trees, snakes, and the Gorgoneion. From her origin as an Aegean palace goddess, Athena
Athena
was closely associated with the city. She was known as Polias and Poliouchos (both derived from polis, meaning "city-state"), and her temples were usually located atop the fortified Acropolis
Acropolis
in the central part of the city
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Horse
at least 48 publishedThe horse (Equus ferus caballus)[2][3] is one of two extant subspecies of Equus ferus. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, Eohippus, into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies caballus are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. These feral populations are not true wild horses, as this term is used to describe horses that have never been domesticated, such as the endangered Przewalski's horse, a separate subspecies, and the only remaining true wild horse
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Silver
Silver
Silver
is a chemical element with symbol Ag (from the Latin
Latin
argentum, derived from the Proto-Indo-European
Proto-Indo-European
h₂erǵ: "shiny" or "white") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form ("native silver"), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining. Silver
Silver
has long been valued as a precious metal
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Dram (unit)
The dram (alternative British spelling drachm; apothecary symbol ʒ or ℨ; abbreviated dr)[1][2]:C-6–C-7[3] is a unit of mass in the avoirdupois system, and both a unit of mass and a unit of volume in the apothecaries' system.[2] It was originally both a coin and a weight in ancient Greece.[4] The unit of volume is more correctly called a fluid dram, fluid drachm, fluidram or fluidrachm (abbreviated fl dr, ƒ 3, or fʒ).[1][2]:C-17[3][5][6][7]Contents1 Ancient unit of mass 2 British unit of mass 3 Modern unit of mass 4 Unit of volume 5 In popular culture 6 References 7 External linksAncient unit of mass[edit]Silver Drachm from Dyrrhachium, Illyria dated circa 229 BC. Obverse: ΞΕΝΩΝ,(XENON) cow standing right, looking back at calf which it suckles, eagle standing right above; Reverse: DUR PURBA, square containing double stellate pattern, club to left
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Mycenaean Greece
Mycenaean Greece
Greece
(or Mycenaean civilization) was the last phase of the Bronze Age
Bronze Age
in Ancient Greece, spanning the period from approximately 1600–1100 BC. It represents the first advanced civilization in mainland Greece, with its palatial states, urban organization, works of art and writing system.[1] Among the centers of power that emerged, the most notable were those of Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens
Athens
in Central Greece
Greece
and Iolcos in Thessaly. The most prominent site was Mycenae, in Argolid, after which the culture of this era is named
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Greek National Road 30
Greek National Road 30
Greek National Road 30
(Greek: Εθνική Οδός 30, abbreviated as EO30) is a single carriageway road in central Greece. It connects the cities of Arta and Volos, via Trikala
Trikala
and Karditsa. Route[edit] The western end of the Greek National Road 30
Greek National Road 30
is in Arta, where it is connected with GR-5. It runs northeast through the sparsely populated Athamanika
Athamanika
mountains, until it reaches the town Pyli, where it enters the Thessalian Plain. At Trikala
Trikala
it connects with the GR-6, and turn southeast towards Karditsa, where it turns east. The section between Neo Monastiri and Farsala
Farsala
is shared with the GR-3. The Motorway 1 is crossed at Mikrothives. At Nea Anchialos
Nea Anchialos
the GR-30 reaches the coast of the Pagasetic Gulf
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Myrmidons
The Myrmidons (Greek: Μυρμιδόνες Myrmidones) were a legendary people of Greek mythology, native to the region of Thessaly. During the Trojan War, they were commanded by Achilles,[1] as described in Homer's Iliad. According to Greek legend, they were created by Zeus
Zeus
from a colony of ants and therefore took their name from the Greek word for ant, myrmex (Greek: μύρμηξ).[2]Contents1 Origins 2 In the Iliad 3 Later references 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigins[edit]Look up Myrmidon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Ovid
Ovid
mentions an etiological myth of the Myrmidons in Metamorphoses, Book 7 (8 CE)
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Peleus
In Greek mythology, Peleus
Peleus
(/ˈpiːliəs, ˈpiːljuːs, ˈpɛliəs, ˈpɛljuːs/; Greek: Πηλεύς, Pēleus) was a hero whose myth was already known to the hearers of Homer
Homer
in the late 8th century BC.[1] Peleus
Peleus
was the son of Aeacus, king of the island of Aegina,[2] and Endeïs, the oread of Mount Pelion
Pelion
in Thessaly.[3] He married the sea-nymph Thetis
Thetis
with whom he fathered Achilles. Peleus
Peleus
and his brother Telamon
Telamon
were friends of Heracles, and served in Heracles' expedition against the Amazons, his war against King Laomedon, and his quest for the Golden Fleece
Golden Fleece
alongside Jason
Jason
and the Argonauts
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