HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Phalloi
A phallus is a penis (especially when erect),[1] an object that resembles a penis, or a mimetic image of an erect penis. Any object that symbolically—or, more precisely, iconically—resembles a penis may also be referred to as a phallus; however, such objects are more often referred to as being phallic (as in "phallic symbol")
[...More...]

"Phalloi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ithyphallic (album)
Ithyphallic is the fifth studio album by American technical death metal band Nile. It was released on July 17, 2007 through Nuclear Blast, in both standard and digipak formats. It is the band's first album released on Nuclear Blast, since signing with them in May 2006. It is also the band's first album since Amongst the Catacombs of Nephren-Ka not to feature notes explaining the context of the lyrics. 1,000 limited edition copies of the album were released in a pyramid-shaped box containing the disc, several images, a certificate of ownership and a scroll containing the lyrics and liner notes from the album. The cover art of this album depicts a statue of the god of fertility "Min", being erected by Egyptian slaves
[...More...]

"Ithyphallic (album)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fascinum
In ancient Roman religion and magic, the fascinus or fascinum was the embodiment of the divine phallus. The word can refer to the deity himself (Fascinus), to phallus effigies and amulets, and to the spells used to invoke his divine protection.[1] Pliny calls it a medicus invidiae, a "doctor" or remedy for envy (invidia, a "looking upon") or the evil eye.Contents1 Public religion 2 Magic symbols 3 Etymology 4 References 5 External linksPublic religion[edit] Fascinus
Fascinus
from Pompeii
Pompeii
showing a phallusThe Vestal Virgins tended the cult of the fascinus populi Romani, the sacred image of the phallus that was one of the tokens of the safety of the state (sacra Romana)
[...More...]

"Fascinum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Herms
Herms may refer to: George Herms (born 1935), American artist René Herms
René Herms
(1982-2009), German middle-distance runner Herms Niel
Herms Niel
(1888-1954), German composer of military songs and marchesSee also[edit]Herm (other)This page or section lists people that share the same given name or the same family name
[...More...]

"Herms" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pan (mythology)
In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Pan (/pæn/;[1] Ancient Greek: Πάν, Pan) is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds, rustic music and impromptus, and companion of the nymphs.[2] He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. With his homeland in rustic Arcadia, he is also recognized as the god of fields, groves, wooded glens and often affiliated with sex; because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Pan to be the god of theatrical criticism.[3] The word panic ultimately derives from the god's name. In Roman religion and myth, Pan's counterpart was Faunus, a nature god who was the father of Bona Dea, sometimes identified as Fauna; he was also closely associated with Sylvanus, due to their similar relationships with woodlands
[...More...]

"Pan (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(/æfrəˈdaɪti/ ( listen) af-rə-DY-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη Aphrodítē) is the ancient Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans. The cult of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was largely derived from that of the Phoenician goddess Astarte, a cognate of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar, whose cult was based on the Sumerian cult of Inanna. Aphrodite's main cult centers were Cythera, Cyprus, Corinth, and Athens. Her main festival was the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated annually in midsummer. In Laconia, Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was worshipped as a warrior goddess
[...More...]

"Aphrodite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dionysus
Dionysus
Dionysus
(/daɪ.əˈnaɪsəs/; Greek: Διόνυσος Dionysos) is the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness, fertility,[2][3] theatre and religious ecstasy in ancient Greek religion and myth. Wine
Wine
played an important role in Greek culture, and the cult of Dionysus
Dionysus
was the main religious focus for its unrestrained consumption.[4] His worship became firmly established in the seventh century BC.[5] He may have been worshipped as early as c. 1500–1100 BC by Mycenean Greeks;[6][7] traces of Dionysian-type cult have also been found in ancient Minoan Crete.[8] His origins are uncertain, and his cults took many forms; some are described by ancient sources as Thracian, others as Greek.[9][10][11] In some cults, he arrives from the east, as an Asiatic foreigner; in others, from Ethiopia
Ethiopia
in the South
[...More...]

"Dionysus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Adonis
Adonis[a] was the mortal lover of the goddess Aphrodite
Aphrodite
in Greek mythology. In Ovid's first-century AD telling of the myth, he was conceived after Aphrodite
Aphrodite
cursed his mother Myrrha
Myrrha
to lust after her own father, King Cinyras
Cinyras
of Cyprus. Myrrha
Myrrha
had sex with her father in complete darkness for nine nights, but he discovered her identity and chased her with a sword. The gods transformed her into a myrrh tree and, in the form of a tree, she gave birth to Adonis. Aphrodite
Aphrodite
found the infant and gave him to be raised by Persephone, the queen of the Underworld
[...More...]

"Adonis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Priapism
Priapism
Priapism
is a condition in which a penis remains erect for hours in the absence of stimulation or after stimulation has ended.[3] There are three types: ischemic (low-flow), nonischemic (high-flow), and recurrent ischemic (intermittent).[3] Most cases are ischemic.[3] Ischemic
[...More...]

"Priapism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tyrnavos
Tyrnavos
Tyrnavos
(Greek: Τύρναβος) is a municipality in the Larissa regional unit, of the Thessaly
Thessaly
region of Greece. It is the second largest town of the Larissa
Larissa
regional unit, after Larissa. The town is near the mountains and the Thessalian Plain. The river Titarisios, a tributary of the Pineios, flows through the town. Tyrnavos
Tyrnavos
is bypassed by the GR-3 ( Larissa
Larissa
- Kozani
Kozani
- Niki) and has an old road connecting the town to Elassona. It will be linked with a superhighway numbered 3 (A3) with an unscheduled opening date
[...More...]

"Tyrnavos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Phallic Processions
Phallic processions, or Penis Parade,[1] called phallika in ancient Greece, were a common feature of Dionysiac celebrations; they were processions that advanced to a cult center, and were characterized by obscenities and verbal abuse.[2] The display of a fetishized phallus was a common feature.[3][4] In a famous passage in chapter 3.3 of the Poetics, Aristotle
Aristotle
formulated the hypothesis that the earliest forms of comedy originated and evolved from "those who lead off the phallic processions", which were still common in many towns at his time.[2][5][6] The city of
[...More...]

"Phallic Processions" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lent
Lent
Lent
(Latin: Quadragesima: Fortieth) is a solemn religious observance in the Christian liturgical calendar that begins on Ash Wednesday
Ash Wednesday
and ends approximately six weeks later, before Easter
Easter
Sunday
[...More...]

"Lent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Culture Of Ancient Rome
The culture of ancient Rome
Rome
existed throughout the almost 1200-year history of the civilization of Ancient Rome. The term refers to the culture of the Roman Republic, later the Roman Empire, which at its peak covered an area from Lowland Scotland
Lowland Scotland
and Morocco
Morocco
to the Euphrates. Life in ancient Rome
Rome
revolved around the city of Rome, its famed seven hills, and its monumental architecture such as the Colosseum, Trajan's Forum, and the Pantheon. The city also had several theaters, gymnasia, and many taverns, baths, and brothels. Throughout the territory under ancient Rome's control, residential architecture ranged from very modest houses to country villas, and in the capital city of Rome, there were imperial residences on the elegant Palatine Hill, from which the word palace is derived
[...More...]

"Culture Of Ancient Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tintinnabulum (Ancient Rome)
In ancient Rome, a tintinnabulum (less often tintinnum)[1] was a wind chime or assemblage of bells. A tintinnabulum often took the form of a bronze phallic figure or fascinum, a magico-religious phallus thought to ward off the evil eye and bring good fortune and prosperity. A tintinnabulum was hung outdoors in locations such as gardens, porticoes, houses, and shops, where the wind would cause them to tinkle
[...More...]

"Tintinnabulum (Ancient Rome)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greek Mythology
Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language
[...More...]

"Greek Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Evil Eye
The evil eye is a curse believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when they are unaware. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause misfortune or injury.[1] Talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called "evil eyes".[2][3] The idea expressed by the term causes many different cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, primarily in West Asia. The idea appears several times in rabbinic literature.[4] It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures
[...More...]

"Evil Eye" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.