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Peugeot 309
The Peugeot
Peugeot
309 is a small family car that was manufactured between 1985 and 1994 in England, Spain
Spain
and France
France
by PSA Peugeot
Peugeot
Citroën. It was originally intended to be badged as a Talbot
Talbot
and, as development progressed, to be called the Talbot
Talbot
Arizona.[1] It was the replacement for the Talbot
Talbot
Horizon, which had started life as a Chrysler in Britain and a Simca
Simca
in France, and was also being built in several guises for the American market.[2] In 1985, the PSA Group decided to discontinue the Talbot
Talbot
brand, with the last Talbot
Talbot
passenger vehicle to be launched being the Samba of 1981, and to market the car as a Peugeot
Peugeot
instead
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Fuel Injection
Fuel
Fuel
injection is the introduction of fuel in an internal combustion engine, most commonly automotive engines, by the means of an injector. All diesel engines use fuel injection by design
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FF Layout
In automotive design, an FWD, or front-engine, front-wheel-drive layout places both the internal combustion engine and driven roadwheels at the front of the vehicle.Contents1 Usage implications 2 Historical arrangements2.1 Mid-engine / Front-wheel drive 2.2 Longitudinally mounted front-engine and front-wheel drive 2.3 Front-engine transversely mounted / Front-wheel drive2.3.1 Front-wheel drive
Front-wheel drive
design characteristics 2.3.2 Front-wheel drive
Front-wheel drive
shafts3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingUsage implications[edit] Further information: Automobile layout
Automobile layout
and Front-wheel-driveFront-engine positionHistorically, this designation was used regardless of whether the entire engine was behind the front axle line
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Citroën AX
The Citroën AX is a city car which was built by the French manufacturer Citroën from 1986 to 1998. It was launched at the 1986 Paris Motor Show to replace the Citroën Visa and Citroën LNA.Contents1 Overview1.1 Facelift2 Derivatives 3 Models 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit]Rear of pre-facelift AXInterior of an early AXInterior of a later AXDevelopment of this model started in 1983, and was initially also going to form the basis of a sister model from Talbot to replace the Samba; however, the falling popularity of the Talbot brand - coupled with the huge success of the new Peugeot 205 - had led to Peugeot deciding to axe it by the time the Citroën AX was launched, and so the Talbot version never made it into production.[1] The car was available on the left-hand drive continental markets from its launch on 2 October 1986,[2] as a three-door hatchback with 1.0, 1.1 and 1.4-litre TU-series belt driven OHC engines
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Right- And Left-hand Traffic
The terms right-hand traffic (RHT) and left-hand traffic (LHT) refer to the practice, in bidirectional traffic situations, to keep to the right side or to the left side of the road, respectively. This is so fundamental to traffic flow that it is sometimes referred to as the rule of the road.[1] RHT is used in 163 countries and territories, with the remaining 76 countries and territories using LHT. Countries that use LHT account for about a sixth of the world's area and a quarter of its roads.[2] In 1919, 104 of the world's territories were LHT and an equal number were RHT. From 1919 to 1986, 34 of the LHT territories switched to RHT.[3] Many of the countries with LHT were formerly part of the British Empire. In addition, Cyprus, Japan, Indonesia
Indonesia
and other countries have retained the LHT tradition
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Coventry
Coventry
Coventry
(/ˈkɒvəntri/ ( listen)[4]) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands, England. Historically part of Warwickshire, Coventry
Coventry
is the 9th largest city in England
England
and the 12th largest in the United Kingdom.[5] It is the second largest city in the West Midlands region, after Birmingham, with a population of 345,385 in 2015.[6] Coventry
Coventry
is 19 miles (31 km) east-southeast of Birmingham, 24 miles (39 km) southwest of Leicester, 11 miles (18 km) north of Warwick
Warwick
and 95 miles (153 km) northwest of central London. Coventry Cathedral
Coventry Cathedral
was built after the destruction of the 14th century cathedral church of Saint Michael by the Luftwaffe in the Coventry Blitz
Coventry Blitz
of 14 November 1940
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United States Of America
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
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Poissy
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Poissy
Poissy
(French pronunciation: ​[pwasi]) is a commune in the Yvelines
Yvelines
department in the Île-de- France
France
in north-central France. It is located in the western suburbs of Paris, 23.8 km (14.8 mi) from the centre of Paris. In 1561 it was the site of a fruitless Catholic-Huguenot conference, the Colloquy of Poissy
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Petrol
Gasoline
Gasoline
(American English), or petrol (British English), is a transparent, petroleum-derived liquid that is used primarily as a fuel in spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives. On average, a 42-gallon barrel of crude oil (159 L) yields about 19 US gallons (72 L) of gasoline when processed in an oil refinery, though this varies based on the crude oil source's assay. The characteristic of a particular gasoline blend to resist igniting too early (which causes knocking and reduces efficiency in reciprocating engines) is measured by its octane rating. Gasoline
Gasoline
is produced in several grades of octane rating
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Pininfarina
Pininfarina
Pininfarina
S.p.A. (short for Carrozzeria Pininfarina) is an Italian car design firm and coachbuilder, with headquarter in Cambiano, (Metropolitan City of Turin), Italy. It was founded by Battista "Pinin" Farina in 1930. On December 14, 2015, Mahindra Group
Mahindra Group
acquired Pininfarina
Pininfarina
S.p.A. in a deal worth about €168 million.[2] Pininfarina
Pininfarina
is employed by a wide variety of automobile manufactures to design vehicles
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Diesel Engine
The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel which is injected into the combustion chamber is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel that is injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. In diesel engines, glow plugs (combustion chamber pre-warmers) may be used to aid starting in cold weather, or when the engine uses a lower compression-ratio, or both
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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Overhead Camshaft
Overhead camshaft,[1][2] commonly abbreviated to OHC,[1][2] is a valvetrain configuration which places the camshaft of an internal combustion engine of the reciprocating type within the cylinder heads ("above" the pistons and combustion chambers) and drives the valves or lifters in a more direct manner compared with overhead valves (OHV) and pushrods.Contents1 Overview 2 Single overhead camshaft2.1 Alternative SOHC layouts3 Dual overhead camshaft 4 Triple overhead camshaft 5 Camshaft
Camshaft
drive systems5.1 Timing belt 5.2 Timing chain 5.3 Bevel shaft 5.4 Gear train 5.5 Cranks and rods6 Variable valve timing 7 History7.1
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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Automobile Layout
In automotive design, the automobile layout describes where on the vehicle the engine and drive wheels are found. Many different combinations of engine location and driven wheels are found in practice, and the location of each is dependent on the application for which the vehicle will be used. Factors influencing the design choice include cost, complexity, reliability, packaging (location and size of the passenger compartment and boot), weight distribution, and the vehicle's intended handling characteristics. Layouts can roughly be divided into two categories: front- or rear-wheel drive
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