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Petun
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Tabacco people, Tobacco nation,[1] the Petun, or Tionontati in their Iroquoian
Iroquoian
language, were a historical First Nations
First Nations
band government closely related to the Huron Confederacy (Wendat). Their homeland was located along the southwest edge of Georgian Bay
Georgian Bay
of Lake Huron, in the area immediately to the west of the Huron territory in Southern Ontario
Southern Ontario
of present-day Canada
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Indigenous Peoples In Canada
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eIndigenous peoples in Canada,[2] also known as Native Canadians
Canadians
or Aboriginal Canadians, are the indigenous peoples within the boundaries of present-day Canada. They comprise the First Nations,[3] Inuit[4] and Métis.[5] Although "Indian" is a term still commonly used in legal documents, the descriptors "Indian" and "Eskimo" have somewhat fallen into disuse in Canada
Canada
and some consider them to be pejorative.[6][7][8] Similarly, "Aboriginal" as a collective noun is a specific term of art used in some legal documents, including the Constitution Act, 1982, though in some circles that word is also falling into disfavour.[9] Old Crow Flats and Bluefish Caves
Bluefish Caves
are some of the earliest known sites of human habitation in Canada
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Inuit Grammar
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Inuit
Inuit
language, like other Eskimo–Aleut languages, exhibits a regular agglutinative and heavily suffixing morphology. The language is rich in suffixes, up to 700 per dialect[citation needed], making words very long and potentially unique
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Indigenous Peoples In Quebec
Indigenous peoples in Quebec
Quebec
total 11 distinct ethnic groups. The 10 First Nations
First Nations
and the Inuit
Inuit
communities number 141,915 people and account for approximately 2% of the population of Quebec, Canada.Contents1 Inuit 2 First Nations2.1 Algonquian2.1.1 Abenakis 2.1.2 Atikamekw 2.1.3 Crees 2.1.4 Malecites 2.1.5 Mi'kmaqs 2.1.6 Innus 2.1.7 Naskapis2.2 Iroquoian2.2.1 Wendats 2.2.2 Mohawks3 Recognized rights 4 See also 5 External linksInuit[edit] The Inuit
Inuit
communities of Quebec
Quebec
are located in the northernmost part of the province, in an area known as Nunavik
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First Nations In Saskatchewan
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e First Nations
First Nations
in Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
constitute many Native Canadian band governments. First Nations
First Nations
ethnicities in the province include the Cree, Assiniboine, Saulteaux, Dene and Dakota. Historically the Atsina and Blackfoot could also be found at various times. "In 1992, the federal and provincial governments signed a historic land claim agreement with Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
First Nations. Under the Agreement, the First Nations
First Nations
received money to buy land on the open market
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Indigenous Peoples In Northern Canada
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Indigenous peoples in Northern Canada
Northern Canada
consist of the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Pacific Northwest Coast
The indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
Coast are composed of many nations and tribal affiliations, each with distinctive cultural and political identities, but they share certain beliefs, traditions and practices, such as the centrality of salmon as a resource and spiritual symbol. The term Northwest Coast or North West Coast is used in anthropology to refer to the groups of Indigenous people residing along the coast of British Columbia, Washington state, parts of Alaska, Oregon, and northern California. The term Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
is largely used in the American context. At one point the region had the highest population density of a region inhabited by Aboriginal peoples in Canada.[1][2][3]Chief Anotklosh of the Taku Tribe of the Tlingit
Tlingit
people, ca
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Inuit Languages
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Inuit
Inuit
languages are a closely related group of indigenous American languages traditionally spoken across the North American Arctic and to some extent in the subarctic in Labrador. The related Yupik languages are spoken in western and southern Alaska
Alaska
and in the far east of Russia, but are severely endangered in Russia today and spoken only in a few villages on the Chukchi Peninsula
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Aboriginal English In Canada
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eIndigenous English, also known as First Nations
First Nations
English, refers to varieties of English used by the Indigenous peoples of Canada. They are outwardly similar to standard Canadian English
Canadian English
from the perspective of a non-Canadian. However, they differ enough from mainstream Canadian speech that Indigenous peoples (the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit) are often identifiable by their speech to non-Indigenous people
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Americanist Phonetic Notation
Americanist phonetic notation, also known as the North American Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
or NAPA, is a system of phonetic notation originally developed by European and American anthropologists and language scientists (students of Neogrammarians) for the phonetic and phonemic transcription of indigenous languages of the Americas and for languages of Europe. It is still commonly used by linguists working on, among others, Slavic, Uralic, Semitic languages
Semitic languages
and for the languages of the Caucasus and of India (however, Uralists commonly use a variant known as the Uralic Phonetic Alphabet). The term "Americanist phonetic alphabet" is misleading because it has always been widely used outside the Americas
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Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eCanadian Aboriginal syllabic writing, or simply syllabics, is a family of abugidas (writing systems based on consonant-vowel pairs) used to write a number of indigenous Canadian languages of the Algonquian, Inuit, and (formerly) Athabaskan
Athabaskan
language families. They are valued for their distinctiveness from the Latin script
Latin script
of the dominant languages and for the ease with which literacy can be achieved;[2] indeed, by the late 19th century the Cree had achieved what may have been one of the highest rates of literacy in the world.[3] Canadian syllabics are currently used to write all of the Cree languages from Naskapi
Naskapi
(spoken in Quebec) to the Rocky Mountains, including Eastern Cree, Woods Cree, Swampy Cree
Swampy Cree
and Plains Cree
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Mythologies Of The Indigenous Peoples Of North America
The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. The principle of an all embracing, universal and omniscient Great Spirit, a connection to the Earth, diverse creation narratives and collective memories of ancient ancestors are common. Traditional worship practices are often a part of tribal gatherings with dance, rhythm, songs and trance (e.g
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First Nations In Alberta
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e First Nations
First Nations
in Alberta
Alberta
are indigenous peoples who live in the Canadian province of Alberta. The First Nations
First Nations
are those peoples (or nations) recognized as Aboriginal peoples in Canada
Aboriginal peoples in Canada
excluding the Inuit
Inuit
and the Métis. According to the Canadian census, in 2001 a population of 84,990 Albertans reported a "North American Indian" (i.e
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Inuit Mythology
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e Inuit
Inuit
religion is the shared spiritual beliefs and practices of Inuit, an indigenous people from Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. Their religion shares many similarities with religions of other North Polar peoples. Traditional Inuit
Inuit
religious practices include animism and shamanism, in which spiritual healers mediate with spirits. [1] Today many Inuit
Inuit
follow Christianity, but traditional Inuit spirituality continues as part of a living, oral tradition and part of contemporary Inuit
Inuit
society. Inuit
Inuit
who balance indigenous and Christian theology practice religious syncretism.[2] Inuit
Inuit
cosmology provides a narrative about the world and the place of people within it
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Band Government
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eCanadaThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of CanadaGovernmentThe Crown Monarch (Elizabeth II)Governor General (Julie Payette) Monarchy in the provincesLieutenant governorsExecutive (Queen-in-Council) Queen's Privy CouncilPrime minister (Justin Trudeau) Cabinet (29th ministry) Ministries President of the Privy Council Clerk of the Privy Council Privy Council Office Civil ServiceProvincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Governmen
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Lake Huron
Lake Huron
Lake Huron
is one of the five Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America. Hydrologically, it comprises the easterly portion of Lake Michigan–Huron, having the same surface elevation as its westerly counterpart, to which it is connected by the 5-mile-wide (8.0 km), 20-fathom-deep (120 ft; 37 m) Straits of Mackinac. It is shared on the north and east by the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
and on the south and west by the state of Michigan
Michigan
in the United States. The name of the lake is derived from early French explorers who named it for the Huron people inhabiting the region. The Huronian glaciation was named due to evidence collected from Lake Huron region. The northern parts of the lake include the North Channel and Georgian Bay. Across the lake to the southwest is Saginaw Bay. The main inlet is the St
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