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Peter Woods (journalist)
Peter Holmes Woods (7 November 1930 – 22 March 1995) was a British journalist, reporter and newsreader. He was one of the BBC's best known broadcasters of his day. He was the biological father of BBC broadcaster Justin Webb. Early life and career[edit] Born in Romford, Essex, Woods was educated at Hull Grammar School and Imperial Service College, Windsor. He began his career in print journalism, writing for newspapers including The Yorkshire Post, the Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and the Daily Mirror, with a break for military service as a commissioned officer in the Royal Horse Guards. He is best remembered for his television work for BBC News
BBC News
on Newsroom initially as a reporter but also as a newsreader from the 1960s until the early 1980s. He was the first newsreader to broadcast in colour on BBC 2, in News Room.[1] In 1976, he slurred his words on the late evening news
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Peter Wood (other)
Peter Wood may refer to:Peter Atte Wode (fl. c. 1325–1382), English justice Pete Wood (1867–1923), Canadian-American Major League Baseball pitcher Peter Wood (director) (1925–2016), English theatre director Peter Hill-Wood (born 1936), English businessman Peter Wood (musician) (1950–1993), English keyboardist Peter Wood (businessman), founder of insurance companies Direct Line and Esure Peter Wood, Australian businessman and founding partner G. Wood, Son & Co. Peter H. Wood (born 1943), American historian and author Peter K
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Royal Horse Guards
The Royal Regiment
Regiment
of Horse Guards (The Blues) (RHG) was a cavalry regiment of the British Army, part of the Household Cavalry. Raised in August 1650 at Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
and County Durham
County Durham
by Sir Arthur Haselrigge on the orders of Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell
as a Regiment
Regiment
of Horse, the regiment became the Earl of Oxford's Regiment
Regiment
in 1660 upon the Restoration of King Charles II. As, uniquely, the regiment's coat was blue in colour at the time, it was nicknamed "the Oxford Blues", from which was derived the nickname the "Blues." In 1750 the regiment became the Royal Horse Guards
Royal Horse Guards
Blue and eventually, in 1877, the Royal Horse Guards (The Blues). The regiment served in the French Revolutionary Wars and in the Peninsular War
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South Pacific (musical)
South Pacific is a musical composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Oscar Hammerstein II
and book by Hammerstein and Joshua Logan. The work premiered in 1949 on Broadway and was an immediate hit, running for 1,925 performances. The plot is based on James A. Michener's Pulitzer Prize-winning 1947 book Tales of the South Pacific
Tales of the South Pacific
and combines elements of several of those stories. Rodgers and Hammerstein believed they could write a musical based on Michener's work that would be financially successful and, at the same time, send a strong progressive message on racism. The plot centers on an American nurse stationed on a South Pacific island during World War II, who falls in love with a middle-aged expatriate French plantation owner but struggles to accept his mixed-race children. A secondary romance, between a U.S
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Sidcot School
Sidcot School
Sidcot School
is a British co-educational independent school for boarding and day pupils, associated with the Religious Society of Friends. It is one of seven Quaker schools in England. The school is based in the Mendip Hills
Mendip Hills
near the village of Winscombe, Somerset
Somerset
and caters for children between the ages of 3 and 18. Children aged from 3 to 11 are educated in Sidcot Junior School, which is located on its own site adjacent to the main campus. About 130 of the school's 525 pupils (2010) are in this junior school. In the senior school, nearly half of the 395 pupils are boarders. Over 29 different countries are represented making up 25% of the school. Boarders board in the grounds in one of the 7 boarding houses
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Leonard Miall
Rowland Leonard Miall (6 November 1914 – 24 February 2005) was a broadcaster and administrator at the BBC
BBC
for 35 years, from 1939 to 1974. In retirement, he became a research historian, studying the history of broadcasting.Contents1 Early life 2 BBC
BBC
career 3 Later life 4 Family life 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Miall was born in London
London
and educated at Bootham School[1][2] in York. He learned German at Freiburg University, and read economics and law at St John's College, Cambridge. He was President of the Cambridge Union Society and Editor of the Cambridge Review. [3] BBC
BBC
career[edit] Miall joined the European Service of the BBC
BBC
in early 1939
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The New Statesman
The New Statesman
New Statesman
is a British sitcom made in the late 1980s and early 1990s satirising the United Kingdom's Conservative Party Government of the period
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Q (TV Series)
Q... is a surreal television comedy sketch show written by Spike Milligan and Neil Shand, and starring Spike Milligan with a number of supporting players, usually including Julia Breck, John Bluthal, Bob Todd, and John Wells. The show ran from 1969 to 1982 on BBC2. There were six series in all, the first five numbered from Q5 to Q9, and a final series titled There's a Lot of It About. The first and third series ran for seven episodes, and the others for six episodes, each of which was 30 minutes long. Various reasons have been suggested for the title. One possibility is that it was inspired by the project to construct the Cunard liner QE2, launched in September 1967, which was previously codenamed Q4. Another theory is that Milligan was inspired by the BBC 6-point technical quality scale of the time, where "Q5" was severe degradation to picture or sound, and "Q6" was complete loss of sound or vision
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Monty Python
Monty Python
Monty Python
(also collectively known as The Pythons)[2][3] were a British surreal comedy group who created their sketch comedy show Monty Python's Flying Circus, which first aired on the BBC
BBC
in 1969. Forty-five episodes were made over four series. The Python phenomenon developed from the television series into something larger in scope and impact, including touring stage shows, films, numerous albums, several books, and musicals
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BBC Two
BBC
BBC
Two is the second flagship television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and Channel Islands. It covers a wide range of subject matter, but tending towards more "highbrow" programmes than the more mainstream and popular BBC
BBC
One. Like the BBC's other domestic TV and radio channels, it is funded by the television licence, and is therefore free of commercial advertising. It is a comparatively well-funded public-service network, regularly attaining a much higher audience share than most public-service networks worldwide. Originally styled BBC2, it was the third British television station to be launched (starting on 21 April 1964), and from 1 July 1967, Europe's first television channel to broadcast regularly in colour
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Journalist
A journalist is a person who collects, writes, or distributes news or other current information to the public. A journalist's work is called journalism. A journalist can work with general issues or specialize in certain issues. However, most journalists tend to specialize, and by cooperating with other journalists, produce journals that span many topics.[1] For example, a sports journalist covers news within the world of sports, but this journalist may be a part of a newspaper that covers many different topics.Contents1 Roles 2 Journalistic freedom 3 Journalist
Journalist
& source relationship 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksRoles[edit] A reporter is a type of journalist who researches, writes, and reports on information in order to present in sources, conduct interviews, engage in research, and make reports
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BBC News
BBC
BBC
News is an operational business division[1] of the British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs
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Daily Mirror
Labour Left-WingHeadquarters One Canada Square, London, United KingdomCirculation 587,803 Daily (as of November 2017)[1] OCLC
OCLC
number 223228477Website www.mirror.co.ukThe Daily Mirror
Daily Mirror
is a British national daily tabloid newspaper founded in 1903. It is owned by parent company Trinity Mirror. From 1985 to 1987, and from 1997 to 2002, the title on its masthead was simply The Mirror. It had an average daily print circulation of 716,923 in December 2016, dropping markedly to 587,803 the following year.[2] Its Sunday sister paper is the Sunday Mirror
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British Railways
British Railways
British Railways
(BR), which from 1965 traded as British Rail, was the state-owned company that operated most of the rail transport in Great Britain between 1948 and 1997. It was formed from the nationalisation of the "Big Four" British railway companies and lasted until the gradual privatisation of British Rail, in stages between 1994 and 1997. Originally a trading brand of the Railway Executive of the British Transport
Transport
Commission, it became an independent statutory corporation in 1962 designated as the British Railways
British Railways
Board.[1] The period of nationalisation saw sweeping changes in the national railway network. A process of dieselisation and electrification took place, and by 1968 steam locomotion had been entirely replaced by diesel and electric traction, except for one narrow-gauge tourist line
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Daily Mail
Northcliffe House 2 Derry Street London W8 5TTCirculation 1,383,932 (as of November 2017)[1]ISSN 0307-7578 OCLC
OCLC
number 16310567Website www.dailymail.co.ukThe Daily Mail
Daily Mail
is a British daily middle-market[2][3] tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and General Trust[4] and published in London. It is the United Kingdom's second-biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun.[5] Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday
The Mail on Sunday
was launched in 1982 while Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively
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The Yorkshire Post
The Yorkshire
Yorkshire
Post is a daily broadsheet newspaper, published in Leeds in northern England. It covers the whole of Yorkshire
Yorkshire
as well as parts of north Derbyshire
Derbyshire
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
but goes beyond just local news and its masthead carries the slogan "Yorkshire's National Newspaper". Alongside The Scotsman
The Scotsman
it is one of the flagship titles owned by Johnston Press. Founded in 1754, it is one of the oldest newspapers in the country. Its focus on international and national news gives it a wider focus than that usually associated with a provincial newspaper; editions are available throughout the United Kingdom. It has satellite offices in Harrogate, Hull, Scarborough, Sheffield
Sheffield
and York, as well as correspondents in Westminster and the City of London
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