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Peter Brook
Peter Stephen Paul Brook, CH, CBE (born 21 March 1925) is an English theatre and film director who has been based in France since the early 1970s. He has won multiple Tony and Emmy Awards, a Laurence Olivier Award, the Praemium Imperiale, and the Prix Italia. He has been called "our greatest living theatre director".[1] With the Royal Shakespeare Company, Brook directed the first English language production of Marat/Sade
Marat/Sade
in 1964
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Jet Of Blood
Jet of Blood (Jet de Sang), also known as Spurt of Blood, is an extremely short play by the French theatre practitioner, Antonin Artaud, who was also the founder of the "Theatre of Cruelty" movement. Jet of Blood was completed in Paris, on January 17, 1925, perhaps in its entirety on that day alone. The original title was Jet de Sang ou la Boule de Verre, but the second half of the title was dropped prior to the first publication and production of the work.[1]Contents1 Characters 2 Synopsis 3 Themes and Interpretation 4 Publication and Production History 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksCharacters[edit]A Young Man A Young Girl A Knight A Nurse (Wet-Nurse) A Priest A Shoemaker A Sexton A Whore A Judge A Street Peddler A Thunderous Voice A scorpionSynopsis[edit] Jet of Blood is roughly four pages long. It has sparse dialogue and extensive, surreal stage directions. The following synopsis is based on the English translations by George E
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Royal Opera House
The Royal Opera
The Royal Opera
House (ROH) is an opera house and major performing arts venue in Covent Garden, central London. The large building is often referred to as simply "Covent Garden", after a previous use of the site of the opera house's original construction in 1732. It is the home of The Royal Opera, The Royal Ballet, and the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House. Originally called the Theatre Royal, it served primarily as a playhouse for the first hundred years of its history. In 1734, the first ballet was presented. A year later, Handel's first season of operas began. Many of his operas and oratorios were specifically written for Covent Garden
Covent Garden
and had their premieres there. The current building is the third theatre on the site following disastrous fires in 1808 and 1856
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Moscow Satire Theatre
The Moscow Academic Theatre of Satire (Russian: Московский академический театр сатиры) is a dramatic theatre in Moscow, Russia, established in 1924.[1] References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Category:Moscow Satire Theatre.^ О ТЕАТРЕ САТИРЫ (retrieved 26 July 2015)External links[edit]<
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Gresham's School
Gresham’s School is an independent coeducational boarding school in Holt in Norfolk, England. Gresham's School
Gresham's School
is one of the top 30 International Baccalaureate schools in England.[2] The school was founded in 1555 by Sir John Gresham as a free grammar school for forty boys, following King Henry VIII's dissolution of the Augustinian priory at Beeston Regis
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Magdalen College, Oxford
Magdalen College (/ˈmɔːdlɪn/ MAWD-lin)[2] is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford. Magdalen is one of the wealthiest colleges in Oxford, with an estimated financial endowment of £180.8 million as of 2014.[3] Magdalen stands next to the River Cherwell
River Cherwell
and has within its grounds a deer park and Addison's Walk
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Doctor Faustus (play)
Doctor Faustus Chorus Wagner Good Angel Bad Angel Valdes Cornelius Three scholars Lucifer Mephistophiles Robin Beelzebub Seven Deadly Sins Pope Adrian VI Raymond, King of Hungary Bruno Two Cardinals Archbishop
Archbishop
of Rheims Friars Vintner Martino Frederick Benvolio Charles V Duke of Saxony Two soldiers Horse courser Carter Hostess of a tavern Duke and Duchess of Vanholt Servant Old manMuteDarius Alexander the Great Alexander's Paramour Helen of Troy Devils PiperDate premiered c. 1592Original language EnglishGenre TragedySetting 16th century EuropeThe Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus, commonly referred to simply as Doctor Faustus, is an Elizabethan tragedy by Christopher Marlowe, based on German stories about the title character Faust, that was first performed sometime between 1588 and Marlowe's death in 1593
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The Infernal Machine (play)
The Infernal Machine, or La Machine Infernale is a French play by the dramatist Jean Cocteau, based on the ancient Greek myth of Oedipus.[1] The play initially premiered on April 10, 1934 at the Theatre Louis Jouvet in Paris, France, under the direction of Louis Jouvet himself, with costumes and scene design by Christian Bérard.[2] The Infernal Machine, as translated by Albert Bermel, was first played at the Phoenix Theatre, New York, on February 3, 1958, under the direction of Herbert Berghof, with scenery by Ming Cho Less, costumes by Alvin Colt, and lighting by Tharon Musser.Contents1 Plot summary1.1 Prologue 1.2 Act I: The Ghost 1.3 Act II: The Sphinx 1.4 Act III: The Wedding Night 1.5 Act IV: The King2 Departure from Sophocles 3 Connection to Hamlet 4 References 5 Further readingPlot summary[edit] Prologue[edit] The Voice presents a brief prolog and information about events that have occurred before the action of the play takes place
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Stratford-upon-Avon
Stratford-upon-Avon
Stratford-upon-Avon
(/ˌstrætfərd əˌpɒn ˈeɪvən/) is a market town and civil parish in the Stratford-on-Avon District, in the county of Warwickshire,[2] England, on the River Avon, 101 miles (163 km) north west of London, 22 miles (35 km) south east of Birmingham, and 8 miles (13 km) south west of Warwick.[3] The estimated population in 2007 was 25,505,[4] increasing to 27,445 at the 2011 Census. Stratford was originally inhabited by Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
and remained a village before the lord of the manor, John of Coutances, set out plans to develop it into a town in 1196. In that same year, Stratford was granted a charter from King Richard I
King Richard I
to hold a weekly market in the town, giving it its status as a market town
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Love's Labour's Lost
Love's Labour's Lost
Love's Labour's Lost
is one of William Shakespeare's early comedies, believed to have been written in the mid-1590s for a performance at the Inns of Court
Inns of Court
before Queen Elizabeth I. It follows the King of Navarre
Navarre
and his three companions as they attempt to swear off the company of women for three years of study and fasting. Their subsequent infatuation with the Princess of France
France
and her ladies makes them forsworn. In an untraditional ending for a comedy, the play closes with the death of the Princess's father, and all weddings are delayed for a year. The play draws on themes of masculine love and desire, reckoning and rationalization, and reality versus fantasy. Though first published in quarto in 1598, the play's title page suggests a revision of an earlier version of the play
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Richard Strauss
Richard Georg Strauss
Strauss
(11 June 1864 – 8 September 1949) was a leading German composer of the late Romantic and early modern eras
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Tony Award For Best Play
An award is something given to a person, a group of people, like a sports team, or an organization in recognition of their excellence in a certain field.[1][2] An award may be accompanied by trophy, title, certificate, commemorative plaque, medal, badge, pin, or ribbon. An award may carry a monetary prize given to the recipient. For example: the Nobel Prize
Prize
for contributions to society, or the Pulitzer prize for literary achievements
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Salome (opera)
Salome, Op. 54, is an opera in one act by Richard Strauss
Richard Strauss
to a German libretto by the composer, based on Hedwig Lachmann's German translation of the French play Salomé by Oscar Wilde. Strauss dedicated the opera to his friend Sir Edgar Speyer.[1] The opera is famous (at the time of its premiere, infamous) for its "Dance of the Seven Veils". The final scene is frequently heard as a concert-piece for dramatic sopranos.Contents1 Composition history 2 Performance history 3 Roles 4 Synopsis 5 Instrumentation 6 Music 7 The role of Salome 8 Transcriptions 9 Recordings 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksComposition history[edit] Oscar Wilde
Oscar Wilde
originally wrote his Salomé in French
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Salvador Dalí
Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, Marquis of Dalí de Púbol
Púbol
(11 May 1904 – 23 January 1989), known professionally as Salvador Dalí
Salvador Dalí
(/ˈdɑːli, dɑːˈli/[1][2] Catalan: [səɫβəˈðo ðəˈɫi]; Spanish: [salβaˈðoɾ ðaˈli]), was a prominent Spanish surrealist born in Figueres, Catalonia, Spain. Dalí was a skilled draftsman, best known for the striking and bizarre images in his surrealist work. His painterly skills are often attributed to the influence of Renaissance
Renaissance
masters.[3][4] His best-known work, The Persistence of Memory, was completed in August 1931
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Puccini
Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (Italian: [ˈdʒaːkomo putˈtʃiːni]; 22 December 1858 – 29 November 1924) was an Italian opera composer who has been called "the greatest composer of Italian opera after Verdi".[1] Puccini's early work was rooted in traditional late-19th-century romantic Italian opera
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La Boheme
La bohème
La bohème
(French pronunciation: ​[la bɔ.ɛm], Italian: [la boˈɛm]) is an opera in four acts,[N 1] composed by Giacomo Puccini
Giacomo Puccini
to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica
Luigi Illica
and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Scènes de la vie de bohème by Henri Murger.[1] The world premiere performance of La bohème
La bohème
was in Turin
Turin
on 1 February 1896 at the Teatro Regio,[2] conducted by the young Arturo Toscanini; its U.S. premiere took place the following year, 1897, in Los Angeles. Since then, La bohème
La bohème
has become part of the standard Italian opera repertory and is one of the most frequently performed operas worldwide.[3] In 1946, fifty years after the opera's premiere, Toscanini
Toscanini
conducted a performance of it on radio with the NBC Symphony Orchestra
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