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Peter Woodthorpe
Peter Woodthorpe
Peter Woodthorpe
(25 September 1931 – 12 August 2004)[1] was an English film, television and voice actor who supplied the voice of Gollum
Gollum
in the 1978 Bakshi version of The Lord of the Rings and BBC's 1981 radio serial. He also provided the voice of Pigsy in the cult series Monkey and was Max the pathologist in early episodes of Inspector Morse. In the summer of 1955 he played Estragon in the first British production of Waiting for Godot. He had then just finished his second year reading Biochemistry[2] at Magdalene College, Cambridge, and expected to return after a run of a few weeks. When the play was successful, faced with the choice of dropping out either from Cambridge or from the play, he chose to stay with the play and his acting career
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York
York
York
(/ˈjɔːrk/ ( listen)) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of the historic county of Yorkshire
Yorkshire
to which it gives its name. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events in England throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural and sporting activities making it a popular tourist destination. The city was founded by the Romans as Eboracum
Eboracum
in 71 AD. It became the capital of the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia Inferior, and later of the kingdoms of Northumbria
Northumbria
and Jórvík
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Del Boy
Derek Edward Trotter, more commonly known as Del Boy
Del Boy
(born 12 July 1945), is the fictional lead character in the popular BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses and one of the main characters of its prequel, Rock & Chips. He was played by David Jason in the original series and was portrayed as a teenager by James Buckley in the prequel. Del Boy is often regarded as one of the greatest comedy characters in the history of British Television, and is regarded as an iconic character in British culture
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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Joint Services School For Linguists
The Joint Services School for Linguists (JSSL) was founded in 1951 by the British armed services to provide language training, principally in Russian, and largely to selected conscripts undergoing National Service
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Banbury
Banbury
Banbury
/ˈbænbrɪ/ is a historic market town on the River Cherwell in Oxfordshire, England. By road, the town is situated 74 miles (119 km) northwest of London, 42 miles (68 km) southeast of Birmingham, 27 miles (43 km) south of Coventry
Coventry
and 23 miles (37 km) north-by-northwest of the county town of Oxford. It had a population of 46,853 at the 2011 census.[1] Banbury
Banbury
is a significant commercial and retail centre for the surrounding area of north Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
and southern parts of Warwickshire
Warwickshire
and Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
which are predominantly rural. Banbury's main industries are car components, electrical goods, plastics, food processing, and printing
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Freddie Francis
Frederick William Francis (22 December 1917 – 17 March 2007) was an English cinematographer and film director. He achieved his greatest successes as a cinematographer, including winning two Academy Awards, for Sons and Lovers (1960) and Glory (1989). As a director, he was associated with the British production companies Amicus and Hammer in the 1960s and 1970s.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Directorial career 3 Return to cinematography 4 Personal life 5 Selected filmography5.1 As cinematographer 5.2 As director6 Sources 7 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Born in Islington
Islington
in London, England, Francis was originally intending to have a career in engineering. At school, a piece he wrote about films of the future won him a scholarship to the North West London Polytechnic in Kentish Town. He left school at age 16, becoming an apprentice to a stills photographer by the name of Louis Prothero. Francis stayed with him for six months
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Hammer Films
Hammer Film Productions
Hammer Film Productions
is a British film production company based in London. Founded in 1934, the company is best known for a series of gothic horror films made from the mid-1950s until the 1970s. Many of these involved classic horror characters such as Baron Frankenstein, Count Dracula, and The Mummy, which Hammer re-introduced to audiences by filming them in vivid colour for the first time.[2] Hammer also produced science fiction, thrillers, film noir and comedies, as well as, in later years, television series. During their most successful years, Hammer dominated the horror film market, enjoying worldwide distribution and considerable financial success
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Amicus Productions
Amicus Productions
Amicus Productions
was a British film production company, based at Shepperton Studios, England,[1] active between 1962 and 1977. It was founded by American producers and screenwriters Milton Subotsky
Milton Subotsky
and Max Rosenberg.[2]Contents1 Films1.1 Portmanteau horror films 1.2 Other horror films 1.3 Science fiction, espionage, drama2 After Amicus 3 Today 4 Amicus films 5 References 6 Notes 7 Further reading 8 External linksFilms[edit] Amicus's first two films were low-budget musicals for the teenage market, It's Trad, Dad! (1962) and Just for Fun (1963). Prior to establishing Amicus, the two producers collaborated on the horror film The City of the Dead (1960)
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Honoré De Balzac
Honoré de Balzac
Honoré de Balzac
(/ˈbɔːlzæk, ˈbæl-/;[2] French: [ɔ.nɔ.ʁe d(ə) bal.zak], born Honoré Balzac,[1] 20 May 1799 – 18 August 1850) was a French novelist and playwright. The novel sequence La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of post-Napoleonic French life, is generally viewed as his magnum opus. Owing to his keen observation of detail and unfiltered representation of society, Balzac is regarded as one of the founders of realism in European literature.[3] He is renowned for his multi-faceted characters; even his lesser characters are complex, morally ambiguous and fully human. Inanimate objects are imbued with character as well; the city of Paris, a backdrop for much of his writing, takes on many human qualities
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Sitcom
A sit-com or sitcom, a portmanteau of the full term "situation comedy", is a genre of comedy centered on a fixed set of characters who carry over from episode to episode. Sitcoms can be contrasted with sketch comedy, where a troupe may use new characters in each sketch, and stand-up comedy, where a comedian tells jokes and stories to an audience. Sitcoms originated in radio, but today are found mostly on television as one of its dominant narrative forms. This form can also include mockumentaries. A situation comedy television program may be recorded in front of a studio audience, depending on the program's production format. The effect of a live studio audience can be imitated or enhanced by the use of a laugh track. During filming productions, the laugh track is usually prerecorded.[1]Contents1 History 2 By country2.1 Australia 2.2 Canada 2.3 India 2.4 Mexico 2.5 New Zealand 2.6 Russia 2.7 United Kingdom 2.8 United States2.8.1 Sitcoms on U.S. radio 2.8.2 Sitcoms on U.S
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University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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Lennard Pearce
Lennard Pearce (9 February 1915 – 15 December 1984) was an English actor who worked mostly in the theatre, but also appeared in British television programmes. He starred in the last years of his life as Grandad in the sitcom Only Fools and Horses, from its beginning in September 1981 until he died in December 1984.Contents1 Career1.1 Theatre 1.2 Television2 Health problems and death 3 Television roles3.1 Comedy 3.2 Drama4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] Theatre[edit] Pearce studied drama at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
(RADA), in London. As a young actor in the 1930s, he went on a performance tour in Germany
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Grandad (Only Fools And Horses)
Edward Kitchener "Ted" Trotter, better known simply as Grandad, was a character in the BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses
Only Fools and Horses
from 1981 to 1984. He was played by Lennard Pearce in the original series, and was portrayed by Phil Daniels in the prequel, Rock & Chips.[1] The character was grandfather to Del Boy, and Rodney Trotter, and older brother to Uncle Albert (Buster Merryfield). Lennard Pearce's death in December 1984 was written into the series with the death of the character. Backstory[edit] Born in Peckham Rye, London in 1909, Grandad stated that his earliest memories were of watching the soldiers marching off to World War I
World War I
and witnessing their return after the armistice in 1918
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Minder (TV Series)
Minder is a British comedy-drama about the London criminal underworld. Initially produced by Verity Lambert, it was made by Euston Films, a subsidiary of Thames Television
Thames Television
and shown on ITV (originally by Thames, then Central Independent Television in 1993 and 1994 after Thames lost its franchise). The original show ran for ten series between 29 October 1979 and 10 March 1994. The series was notable for using a range of leading British actors, as well as many up-and-coming performers before they hit the big time; at its peak it was one of ITV's biggest ratings winners. In 2008, it was announced that Minder would go into production for broadcast in 2009 (on Channel 5) for a new version, though none of the original cast would appear in the new episodes. The new show focused on Arthur's nephew Archie (created solely for this new version), played by Shane Richie
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The Charge Of The Light Brigade (1968 Film)
The Charge of the Light Brigade
Charge of the Light Brigade
is a 1968 British DeLuxe Color war film made by Woodfall Film Productions in Panavision
Panavision
and distributed by United Artists, depicting parts of the Crimean War
Crimean War
and the eponymous charge. It was directed by Tony Richardson
Tony Richardson
and produced by Neil Hartley
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