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Peter Krešimir IV
Peter Krešimir IV, called the Great (Croatian: Petar Krešimir IV. Veliki, Latin: Petrus Cresimir) (died 1075), was King of Croatia
King of Croatia
and Dalmatia
Dalmatia
from 1059 to his death in 1074/5.[1] He w
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Šibenik
Šibenik
Šibenik
(Croatian pronunciation: [ʃîbeniːk] ( listen); Italian: Sebenico) is a historic city in Croatia, located in central Dalmatia where the river Krka flows into the Adriatic Sea. Šibenik
Šibenik
is a political, educational, transport, industrial and tourist center of Šibenik–Knin County
Šibenik–Knin County
and also the third-largest city in the historic region of Dalmatia
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Benedictine Monastery
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
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Glagolitic
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCE Samaritan
Samaritan
6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c
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Pope
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Rebellion
Rebellion, uprising, or insurrection is a refusal of obedience or order.[1] It refers to the open resistance against the orders of an established authority. The term comes from the Latin verb rebellō, "I renew war" (from re- ("again") + bellō ("I wage war/I revolt"). The rebel is the individual that partakes in rebellion or rebellious activities, particularly when armed. Thus, the term rebellion also refers to the ensemble of rebels in a state of revolt. A rebellion originates from a sentiment of indignation and disapproval of a situation and then manifests itself by the refusal to submit or to obey the authority responsible for this situation. Rebellion
Rebellion
can be individual or collective, peaceful (civil disobedience, civil resistance, and nonviolent resistance) or violent (terrorism, sabotage and guerrilla warfare.)[citation needed] In political terms, rebellion and revolt are often distinguished by their different aims
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Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
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Celibacy
Celibacy
Celibacy
(from Latin, cælibatus") is the state of voluntarily being unmarried, sexually abstinent, or both, usually for religious reasons.[1][2][3][4] It is often in association with the role of a religious official or devotee.[1] In its narrow sense, the term celibacy is applied only to those for whom the unmarried state is the result of a sacred vow, act of renunciation, or religious conviction.[1][5] In a wider sense, it is commonly understood to only mean abstinence from sexual activity.[1][5] Celibacy
Celibacy
has existed in one form or another throughout history, in virtually all the major religions of the world, and views on it have varied. Similarly, the Romans viewed it as an aberration and legislated fiscal penalties against it, with the sole exception granted to the Vestal Virgins
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Latin Liturgy
A Latin
Latin
liturgy is a ceremony or ritual conducted in the Latin language. Generally, the term ' Latin
Latin
liturgy' is used in conjunction with the Christian
Christian
religion, and especially in association with a Catholic
Catholic
Mass, which may be conducted in Latin
Latin
or another language. If the Mass
Mass
was conducted in Latin, it would be referred to as a Latin Mass. The Traditional Latin
Latin
Mass
Mass
or extraordinary form of the Roman rite (as opposed to the ordinary form of the Roman rite) is also referred to as the Tridentine Mass
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Feudalism
Feudalism
Feudalism
was a combination of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries
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Skradin
Skradin
Skradin
(Italian: Scardona) is a small town in the Šibenik-Knin County of Croatia, with a population about 3,986 (2001 census). It is located near the Krka river and at the entrance to the Krka National Park, 17 km (11 mi) from Šibenik
Šibenik
and 100 km (62 mi) from Split. The main attraction of the park, Slapovi Krke, is a series of waterfalls, the biggest of which, Skradinski buk, was named after Skradin.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Places to visit 4 Notable people 5 References 6 External linksName[edit] The name "Scardona" probably comes from the Indo-European root *(s)kwer, meaning cliff. The same root is seen, for instance, in Cersia (the ancient name for Cres).[1][unreliable source?] History[edit] It was an Illyrian settlement (Scardona) on the boundary between the Delmati and the Liburnian
Liburnian
tribes. It was the capital of the Liburnians
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Monastery
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
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Great Schism Of 1054
The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism
Schism
and the Schism
Schism
of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Roman
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St. Mary's Church, Zadar
Church of St. Mary is a benedictine monastery located in Zadar, Croatia. It was founded in 1066 on the eastern side of the old Roman forum.Contents1 History1.1 Gallery2 See also 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] The benedictine monastery was founded beside an existing church in 1066 by the Zadar
Zadar
noblewoman Čika. The monastery subsequently received royal protection and grants by king Petar Krešimir IV. After becoming a nun later in life, Čika
Čika
endowed the monastery with two hymnariums and a prayer book, along with other valuable items. Both hymnariums are lost, but the prayer book survived, and is currently kept in the Bodleian Library
Bodleian Library
in Oxford.[1] Čika's daughter Vekenega entered the monastery as a nun in about 1072, after the death of her husband Dobroslav
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Zadar
Zadar
Zadar
(Croatian: [zâdar] ( listen); see other names) is the oldest continuously inhabited Croatian city. It is situated on the Adriatic Sea, at the northwestern part of Ravni Kotari
Ravni Kotari
region. Zadar
Zadar
serves as the seat of Zadar County
Zadar County
and the wider northern Dalmatian region. The city proper covers 25 km2 (9.7 sq mi) with a population of 75,082 in 2011, making it the fifth-largest city in the nation. The area of present-day Zadar
Zadar
traces its earliest evidence of human life from the late Stone Age, while numerous settlements have been dated as early as the Neolithic. Before the Illyrians, the area was inhabited by an ancient Mediterranean
Mediterranean
people of a pre-Indo-European culture
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