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Pete Townshend
Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend (born 19 May 1945) is an English musician, singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, best known as the lead guitarist, backing vocalist, and principal songwriter for the rock band the Who. His career with the Who spans over 50 years, during which time the band grew to be considered one of the most influential bands of the 20th century.[2][3] Townshend is the main songwriter for the Who, having written well over 100 songs for the band's 11 studio albums, including concept albums and the rock operas Tommy and Quadrophenia, plus popular rock radio staples such as Who's Next, and dozens more that appeared as non-album singles, bonus tracks on reissues, and tracks on rarities compilations such as Odds & Sods (1974). He has also written more than 100 songs that have appeared on his solo albums, as well as radio jingles and television theme songs
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Rock Around The Clock (film)
Rock Around the Clock
Rock Around the Clock
is the title of a 1956 musical film that featured Bill Haley and His Comets
Bill Haley and His Comets
along with Alan Freed, the Platters, Tony Martinez and His Band and Freddie Bell and His Bellboys. It was produced by B-movie
B-movie
king Sam Katzman (who would produce several Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
films in the 1960s) and directed by Fred F. Sears. The film was shot over a short period of time in January 1956 and released in March 1956 to capitalize on Haley's success and the popularity of his multimillion-selling recording "Rock Around the Clock" that debuted in the 1955 teen flick Blackboard Jungle, and is considered the first major rock and roll musical film
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Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
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Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award
Lifetime
Lifetime
may refer to:Life expectancy, the length of time a person is expected to remain aliveContents1 Television 2 Music 3 Other 4 See alsoTelevision[edit] Lifetime
Lifetime
(TV network), a cable television programming network geared towards women
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Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
is an American biweekly magazine that focuses on popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco in 1967 by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine's publisher, and the music critic Ralph J. Gleason. It was first known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson
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Dave Marsh
Dave Marsh (born March 1, 1950) is an American music critic, author, editor and radio talk show host. He rated 'Aja' by Steely Dan 3.5/5 stars and was an early editor of Creem
Creem
magazine, has written for various publications such as Newsday, The Village Voice, and Rolling Stone, and has published numerous books about music and musicians, mostly focused on rock music. He is also a committee member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Derision of musicians 2.2 Talk
Talk
shows3 Charitable causes 4 Publications 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (April 2016)Marsh was born in Detroit, Michigan. He graduated from Waterford Kettering High School in Waterford, Michigan
Michigan
in 1968
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Ukulele
The ukulele (/juːkəˈleɪliː/ yoo-kə-LAY-lee, from Hawaiian: ʻukulele [ˈʔukuˈlɛlɛ] (oo-koo-leh-leh); variant: ukelele)[1] is a member of the lute family of instruments. It generally employs four nylon or gut strings or four courses of strings.[2][3] Some strings may be paired in courses, giving the instrument a total of six or eight strings. The ukulele originated in the 19th century as a Hawaiian adaptation of the Portuguese machete,[4] a small guitar-like instrument, which was introduced to Hawaii
Hawaii
by Portuguese immigrants, mainly from Madeira
Madeira
and the Azores
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Accordion
Depends on configuration: Right-hand manual Chromatic
Chromatic
button accordion Diatonic
Diatonic
button accordion
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Banjo
The banjo is a four-, five- or six-stringed instrument with a thin membrane stretched over a frame or cavity as a resonator, called the head. The membrane, or head, is typically made of plastic, although animal skin is still occasionally but rarely used, and the frame is typically circular. Early forms of the instrument were fashioned by Africans in America, adapted from African instruments of similar design.[1][2] The banjo is frequently associated with folk, Irish traditional, and country music. Historically, the banjo occupied a central place in African American
African American
traditional music, before becoming popular in the minstrel shows of the 19th century.[3][4][5] The banjo, with the fiddle, is a mainstay of American old-time music
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Theme Music
Theme music is a piece that is often written specifically for a radio program, television program, video game or movie, and usually played during the intro, opening credits and/or ending credits.[1] The phrase theme song or signature tune may also be used to refer to a signature song that has become especially associated with a particular performer or dignitary; often used as they make an entrance. The purpose of a theme song is often similar to that of a leitmotif. Such songs can also be used in other ways. One author has made extensive use of them in an effort to explore the feelings behind world views.[2]Contents1 Purpose 2 Celebrities 3 Popularity3.1 Remixes 3.2 Radio 3.3 Video games4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPurpose[edit] The purpose of the music is to establish a mood for the show and to provide an audible cue that a particular show is beginning, which was especially useful in the early days of radio (See also interval signal)
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Radio Jingles
A jingle is a short song or tune used in advertising and for other commercial uses. The jingle contains one or more hooks and meaning that explicitly promote the product or service being advertised, usually through the use of one or more advertising slogans. Ad buyers use jingles in radio and television commercials; they can also be used in non-advertising contexts to establish or maintain a brand image. Jingles are a form of sound branding
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Royal Air Force
The Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) is the United Kingdom's aerial warfare force. Formed towards the end of the First World War
First World War
on 1 April 1918,[2] it is the oldest independent air force in the world.[3] Following victory over the Central Powers
Central Powers
in 1918 the RAF emerged as, at the time, the largest air force in the world.[4] Since its formation, the RAF has taken a significant role in British military history
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The Squadronaires
The Squadronaires is a Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
band which began and performed in Britain during and after World War II. The official title of the band was 'The Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
Dance Orchestra', but it was always known by the more popular title "The Squadronaires".Contents1 History 2 Members 3 Band revival 4 The Civilian Squadronaires 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] In 1939 the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
implemented a plan to raise morale and entertain the troops during wartime, and The Squadronaires was one of the bands organized as a result. The band drew from some of the best musicians of the day
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Concept Album
A concept album is an album in which its tracks hold a larger purpose or meaning collectively than they do individually.[2][3] This is typically achieved through a single central narrative or theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, or lyrical.[4] Sometimes the term is referenced to albums considered to be of "uniform excellence" rather than an LP with an explicit musical or lyrical motif.[5] The exact criterion for a "concept album" varies among critics, with no discernible consensus.[6][3] The format originates with folk singer Woody Guthrie's Dust Bowl Ballads (1940) and subsequently popularized by traditional pop singer Frank Sinatra's 1940s–50s string of albums, but the term is more often associated with rock music. In the 1960s, several well-regarded concept albums were released by various rock bands, which eventually led to the invention of progressive rock and the rock opera
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Gulliver's Travels
Gulliver's Travels, or Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, (which is the full title), is a prose satire[1][2] by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and the "travellers' tales" literary subgenre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature. He himself claimed that he wrote Gulliver's Travels "to vex the world rather than divert it". The book became popular as soon as it was published
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