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Pequea Creek
Pequea Creek (pronounced PECK-way) is a tributary of the Susquehanna River that runs for 49.2 miles (79.2 km)[1] from the eastern border of Lancaster County and Berks County, Pennsylvania
Berks County, Pennsylvania
to the village of Pequea, about 5 miles (8 km) above the hydroelectric dam at Holtwood along the Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River
in Lancaster County. The name of the creek is Shawnee for "dust" or "ashes", referring to a clan that once dwelt at the mouth of the creek.[2] The stream flows through a pastoral landscape farmed extensively by Pennsylvania German
Pennsylvania German
farmers, generally members of Mennonite, Amish, and German-speaking Reformed churches
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Tributary
A tributary[1] or affluent[2] is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem (or parent) river or a lake.[3] A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean.[4] Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean. A confluence, where two or more bodies of water meet together, usually refers to the joining of tributaries. The opposite to a tributary is a distributary, a river or stream that branches off from and flows away from the main stream.[5] Distributaries are most often found in river deltas.Contents1 Terminology 2 Ordering and enumeration 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerminology[edit]Looking downstream, the Shenandoah River
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Pennsylvania German
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Dutch (Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch,  listen (help·info)) are a cultural group formed by early German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and their descendants. The word "Dutch" does not refer to the Dutch people
Dutch people
or Dutch language, but to the German settlers, known as Deutsch (in standard German) and Deitsch (in the principal dialect they spoke, Palatine German). Most emigrated to the Americas from Germany
Germany
or Switzerland
Switzerland
in the 17th and 18th century. Over time, the various dialects spoken by these immigrants fused into a unique dialect of German known as Pennsylvania German or Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
"Dutch"
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Old Order Amish
The Old Order Amish
Amish
are a North American ethno-religious group consisting of some 2000 local churches. There is no formal church organisation to bind them together, but they are linked by common faith, traditions and ancestry. The Amish
Amish
separated from mainstream Mennonites in 1693, led by Jakob Ammann. The Old Order Amish
Amish
form by far the largest group of Amish.Contents1 Different groups of Amish 2 Books 3 References 4 Further reading4.1 Education 4.2 Health4.2.1 Bipolar affective disorder 4.2.2 Cystic fibrosis 4.2.3 Diabetes 4.2.4 Happiness 4.2.5 Healthcare 4.2.6 Inbreeding 4.2.7 Obesity4.3 Music 4.4 Tourism5 External linksDifferent groups of Amish[edit] Main articles: Amish
Amish
and Subgroups of Amish "Old Order Amish" is an American term that describes those who resisted innovations both in society and in church work
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Reformed Churches
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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Amish
The Amish
Amish
(/ˈɑːmɪʃ/; Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
German: Amisch, German: Amische) are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships with Swiss Anabaptist
Anabaptist
origins. They are closely related to, but distinct from, Mennonite
Mennonite
churches. The Amish
Amish
are known for simple living, plain dress, and reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology. The history of the Amish
Amish
church began with a schism in Switzerland within a group of Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists
Anabaptists
in 1693 led by Jakob Ammann.[2] Those who followed Ammann became known as Amish.[3] In the early 18th century, many Amish
Amish
and Mennonites
Mennonites
immigrated to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
for a variety of reasons
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Mennonite
The Mennonites
Mennonites
are members of certain Christian groups belonging to the church communities of Anabaptist
Anabaptist
denominations named after Menno Simons (1496–1561) of Friesland
Friesland
(which today is a province of the Netherlands). Through his writings, Simons articulated and formalized the teachings of earlier Swiss founders. The early teachings of the Mennonites
Mennonites
were founded on the belief in both the mission and ministry of Jesus, which the original Anabaptist
Anabaptist
followers held to with great conviction despite persecution by the various Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Protestant
Protestant
states. Rather than fight, the majority of these followers survived by fleeing to neighboring states where ruling families were tolerant of their belief in believer's baptism
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Chesapeake Bay
The Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
(/ˈtʃɛsəpiːk/ CHESS-ə-peek) is an estuary in District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and the U.S. states of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia, lying inland from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and surrounded to the west by the North American mainland and to the east by the Delmarva Peninsula.[2] With its northern portion in Maryland
Maryland
and the southern part in Virginia, the Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
is a very important feature for the ecology and economy of those two states, as well as others
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Shawnee Language
The Shawnee
Shawnee
language is a Central Algonquian language spoken in parts of central and northeastern Oklahoma
Oklahoma
by the Shawnee
Shawnee
people
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Holtwood Dam
Holtwood Dam
Dam
(also Holtwood Hydroelectric Dam, Holtwood Hydroelectric Plant, McCalls Ferry Dam) is the oldest of three major dams built across the lower Susquehanna River, and the middle location of the three. It was constructed as the McCalls Ferry Dam
Dam
between 1905 and 1910 by the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Water & Power Company. The dam was renamed Holtwood in honor of two company executives.[1] PW&P merged with Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Power & Light (PPL) in 1955
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Berks County, Pennsylvania
Berks County ( Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
German: Barricks Kaundi) is a county located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 411,442.[2] The county seat is Reading.[3] Berks County comprises the Reading, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which is also included in the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD Combined Statistical Area
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Holtwood, Pennsylvania
Holtwood, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is a village in Martic Township, Lancaster County, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Pennsylvania. Holtwood is the site of the Muddy Run Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Power Plant (172 Bethesda Church Road West, Holtwood, PA 17532), along the Susquehanna River. It pumps water into a reservoir during off-peak hours and uses that water to generate electricity during peak demand hours; it produces over 1,000 megawatts (MW) of power.[2] References[edit]^ U.S
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Yellow Breeches Creek
Yellow Breeches Creek,[1] also known as Callapatscink Creek (Lenape for "where it returns")[2] is a 56.1-mile-long (90.3 km)[3] tributary of the Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River
in central Pennsylvania, USA.Contents1 Description 2 Tributaries 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] In 1718 Peter Chartier
Peter Chartier
and his father Martin established a trading post about a mile north of the Yellow Breeches along the Susquehanna River. Chartiers Landing was located just off the river between what are now 15th and 16th Streets in New Cumberland, Pennsylvania.[4] Yellow Breeches Creek
Yellow Breeches Creek
rises on the northwestern side of South Mountain, in the Michaux State Forest, and collects the drainage of several hollows along the mountainside
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Conewago Creek (east)
Conewago Creek is a 23.0-mile-long (37.0 km)[1] tributary of the Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River
in Lebanon, Dauphin, and Lancaster counties in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in the United States. The source is at an elevation of 1,100 feet (340 m) at Mount Gretna Heights in Lebanon County
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Swatara Creek
Coordinates: 40°11′5″N 76°43′56″W / 40.18472°N 76.73222°W / 40.18472; -76.73222 Swatara Creek (nicknamed the Swattie) is a 72-mile-long (116 km)[1] tributary of the Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River
in east central Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in the United States
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Manada Creek
Manada Creek[1][2] is a 17.0-mile-long (27.4 km)[3] tributary of Swatara Creek in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in the United States. The watershed drains approximately 32 sq mi (83 km). The name is derived in Lenape, meaning "an island".[4]Contents1 Course 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCourse[edit] The creek is born in Blue Mountain at Fort Indiantown Gap, East Hanover Township by the confluence of several branches. It meanders southwest to flow through Manada Gap, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
creating a water gap through Blue Mountain. The tributary Walnut Run joins Manada Creek
Manada Creek
above Interstate 81. It becomes the border of East Hanover and West Hanover townships
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