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Penobscot Narrows Bridge
The Penobscot Narrows Bridge
Bridge
is a 2,120 feet (646 m) long cable-stayed bridge that carries US 1/SR 3 over the Penobscot River. It connects Verona Island to Prospect, in the U.S. state of Maine. It replaced the Waldo–Hancock Bridge, built in 1931.Contents1 Technical information 2 Observation tower 3 Suicides 4 Closures 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksTechnical information[edit] The Penobscot Narrows Bridge
Bridge
is one of three bridges in the US (the others being Zakim Bridge
Bridge
in Boston, Massachusetts, and Veterans' Glass City Skyway in Toledo, Ohio) constructed recently using a cradle system that carries the strands within the stays from bridge deck to bridge deck, as a continuous element, eliminating anchorages in the pylons.[1] Each epoxy-coated steel strand is carried inside the cradle in a one-inch steel tube
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Toledo, Ohio
Toledo (/təˈliːdoʊ/) is a city in and the county seat of Lucas County, Ohio, United States.[6] Toledo is in northwest Ohio, at the western end of Lake Erie
Lake Erie
bordering the state of Michigan. The city was founded by United States
United States
citizens in 1833 on the west bank of the Maumee River, and originally incorporated as part of Monroe County, Michigan
Michigan
Territory. It was re-founded in 1837, after conclusion of the Toledo War, when it was incorporated in Ohio. After the 1845 completion of the Miami and Erie Canal, Toledo grew quickly; it also benefited from its position on the railway line between New York City
City
and Chicago. The first of many glass manufacturers arrived in the 1880s, eventually earning Toledo its nickname: "The Glass City"
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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WCSH
Portland, Maine United StatesBranding WCSH
WCSH
6 (general) News Center Maine
Maine
(newscasts)Slogan Your
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Maine State Police
The Maine
Maine
State Police is the state police agency for Maine, which has jurisdiction across the state. It was created in 1921 to protect the lives, property, and constitutional rights of the citizens of the State of Maine.Contents1 Vehicles 2 Training programs 3 Field troops 4 Weapons 5 Specialized units5.1 Air Wing 5.2 Bombs/Explosives Unit 5.3 K9 Unit 5.4 Crisis Negotiations Unit 5.5 Dive Team 5.6 Incident Management Assistance Team 5.7 Evidence Response Team 5.8 Executive Protection 5.9 Criminal Investigations and Forensics 5.10 Motor vehicle inspection program 5.11 Motor Vehicle Crash Investigation Program 5.12 Tactical Team6 Chief of State Police 7 Fallen officers 8 Chain of Command 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksVehicles[edit] The Maine
Maine
State police
State police
usesFord Police Interceptor and in both marked and unmarked versions. The marked versions are a dark sky blue
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Hancock County, Maine
Hancock County is a county located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maine. As of the 2010 census, the population was 54,418.[1] Its county seat is Ellsworth.[2] The county was incorporated on June 25, 1789 and named for John Hancock,[3] the first governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Commissioners are Antonio Blasi, Steven Joy, Percy Brown.Contents1 Geography1.1 Adjacent counties2 Demographics2.1 2000 census 2.2 2010 census3 Economy 4 Politics 5 Communities5.1 City 5.2 Towns 5.3 Unorganized territories 5.4 Census-designated places 5.5 Other unincorporated villages6 See also 7 References 8 External linksGeography[edit] According to the U.S
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Suicide Barrier
A suicide barrier is a structure intended to deter people from attempting suicide by deliberately jumping from a high place. Suicide barriers may be placed on high bridges (including bridges said to be "suicide bridges"), observation decks, and other tall structures. Contents1 Different forms and materials 2 Efficacy of suicide barriers for saving lives2.1 Prince Edward Viaduct
Prince Edward Viaduct
/ Bloor Street Viaduct 2.2 Bern Muenster Terrace 2.3 Clifton Suspension Bridge
Bridge
and Memorial Bridge 2.4 Duke Ellington Bridge 2.5 Areas with landmark/suicide bridges did not have higher overall suicide rates3 Purposes beyond saving lives 4 ReferencesDifferent forms and materials[edit] Suicide
Suicide
barriers may be made of different materials and take different forms. Most suicide barriers are fence-like metal structures
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Maine Legislature
The Maine
Maine
Legislature
Legislature
is the state legislature of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maine. It is a bicameral body composed of the lower house Maine
Maine
House of Representatives and the upper house Maine
Maine
Senate. The Legislature convenes at the State House in Augusta, where it has met since 1832. The House of Representatives consists of 151 members, each chosen from single-member constituencies, as well as three non-voting members. The House is one of the few state legislative bodies in the U.S. to set aside special seats for Native Americans, where there are three nonvoting Representatives from the Penobscot
Penobscot
Nation, the Passamaquoddy Tribe, and the Houlton Band of Maliseets
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Bangor, Maine
Bangor (/ˈbæŋɡɔːr/ BANG-gor) is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maine. The city proper has a population of 33,039, while the metropolitan Bangor metropolitan area has a population of 153,746. Modern Bangor was established in the mid-1800s with the lumber and shipbuilding industries. Lying on the Penobscot River, logs could be floated downstream from the Maine
Maine
North Woods and processed at the city's water-powered sawmills, then shipped from Bangor's port to the Atlantic Ocean 30 miles downstream, and from there to any port in the world. Evidence of this is still visible in the lumber barons' elaborate Greek Revival
Greek Revival
and Victorian mansions and the 31 foot high statue of Paul Bunyan. Today, Bangor's economy is based on services and retail, healthcare, and education. Founded as Condeskeag Plantation, Bangor was incorporated as a New England town in 1791
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Penobscot Bay
Penobscot Bay
Penobscot Bay
is an inlet of the Gulf of Maine
Maine
and Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
in south central Maine. The bay originates from the mouth of Maine's Penobscot River, downriver from Belfast. Penobscot Bay
Penobscot Bay
has many working waterfronts including Rockland, Rockport, and Stonington, and Belfast upriver. Penobscot Bay
Penobscot Bay
is between Muscongus Bay
Muscongus Bay
and Blue Hill Bay, just west of Acadia National Park. 11,000 years ago, at the beginning of the Holocene
Holocene
epoch, the Gulf of Maine's sea level fell as low as 180 feet (55 m) below its present height
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Popular Science
Popular science
Popular science
(also called pop-science or popsci) is an interpretation of science intended for a general audience. While science journalism focuses on recent scientific developments, popular science is more broad-ranging. It may be written by professional science journalists or by scientists themselves. It is presented in many forms, including books, film and television documentaries, magazine articles, and web pages.Contents1 Role 2 Common threads 3 Notable English-language popularizers of science 4 Some sources of popular science 5 Science
Science
media5.1 Science
Science
in the headlines 5.2 News online 5.3 Press6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 BibliographyRole[edit] Popular science
Popular science
is a bridge between scientific literature as a professional medium of scientific research, and the realms of popular political and cultural discourse
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Nitrogen
Nitrogen
Nitrogen
is a chemical element with symbol N and atomic number 7. It was first discovered and isolated by Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. Although Carl Wilhelm Scheele
Carl Wilhelm Scheele
and Henry Cavendish had independently done so at about the same time, Rutherford is generally accorded the credit because his work was published first. The name nitrogène was suggested by French chemist Jean-Antoine-Claude Chaptal
Jean-Antoine-Claude Chaptal
in 1790, when it was found that nitrogen was present in nitric acid and nitrates
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Shotgun
A shotgun (also known as a scattergun,[1] or historically as a fowling piece) is a firearm that is usually designed to be fired from the shoulder, which uses the energy of a fixed shell to fire a number of small spherical pellets called shot, or a solid projectile called a slug. Shotguns come in a wide variety of sizes, ranging from 5.5 mm (.22 inch) bore up to 5 cm (2.0 in) bore, and in a range of firearm operating mechanisms, including breech loading, single-barreled, double or combination gun, pump-action, bolt-, and lever-action, semi-automatic, and even fully automatic variants. A shotgun is generally a smoothbore firearm, which means that the inside of the barrel is not rifled. Preceding smoothbore firearms, such as the musket, were widely used by armies in the 18th century. The direct ancestor to the shotgun, the blunderbuss, was also used in a similar variety of roles from self-defense to riot control
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Zakim Bridge
Boston, Massachusetts (North End-Charlestown)Official name Leonard P. Zakim
Leonard P. Zakim
Bunker Hill Memorial BridgeOwner Commonwealth of MassachusettsMaintained by Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Department of TransportationCharacteristicsDesign Hybrid Steel
Steel
and Concrete Cable-stayed bridge[1]Total length 1,432 ft (436 m)Width 183 ft (56 m)Height 270 ft (82 m)[1]Longest span 745 ft (227 m)Clearance below 40 ft (12 m)[2]HistoryConstruction cost $105 million[3]Opened March 30, 2003 (northbound) December 20, 2003 (southbound)[2] Leonard P. Zakim
Leonard P. Zakim
Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge (Massachusetts)The Leonard P. Zakim
Leonard P

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