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Pegasus
Pegasus
Pegasus
(Greek: Πήγασος, Pḗgasos; Latin: Pegasus, Pegasos) is a mythical winged divine stallion, and one of the most recognised creatures in Greek mythology. Usually depicted as pure white, Pegasus is a child of the Olympian god Poseidon, in his role as horse-god. He was foaled by the Gorgon
Gorgon
Medusa[1] upon her death, when the hero Perseus
Perseus
decapitated her. Pegasus
Pegasus
is the brother of Chrysaor
Chrysaor
and the uncle of Geryon. Greco-Roman poets wrote about the ascent of Pegasus
Pegasus
to heaven after his birth, and his subsequent obeisance to Zeus, king of the gods, who instructed him to bring lightning and thunder from Olympus
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Aether (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Aether (/ˈiːθər/; Ancient Greek: Αἰθήρ Aither pronounced [aitʰɛ̌ːr]) was one of the primordial deities. Aether is the personification of the upper air.[1] He embodies the pure upper air that the gods breathe, as opposed to the normal air (ἀήρ, aer) breathed by mortals. Like Tartarus
Tartarus
and Erebus, Aether may have had shrines in ancient Greece, but he had no temples and is unlikely to have had a cult.Contents1 Mythology1.1 Hesiod 1.2 Hyginus 1.3 Orphic Hymns2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesMythology[edit] Hesiod[edit] In Hesiod's Theogony, Aether (Light), was the son of Erebus
Erebus
(Darkness) and Nyx
Nyx
(Night), and the brother of Hemera
Hemera
(Day).[2] Hyginus[edit] The Roman mythographer Hyginus, says Aether was the son of Chaos and Caligo (Darkness).[3] According to Jan Bremmer,[4]Hyginus ..
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Thunderbolt
A thunderbolt or lightning bolt is a symbolic representation of lightning when accompanied by a loud thunderclap. In ancient Hellenic and Roman religious traditions, the thunderbolt represents Zeus
Zeus
or Jupiter
Jupiter
(etymologically 'Sky Father'), thence the origin and ordaining pattern of the universe, as expressed in Heraclitus' fragment describing "the Thunderbolt
Thunderbolt
that steers the course of all things".[1] It is the same in other Indo-European traditions, for example the Vedic Vajra. In its original usage the word may also have been a description of the consequences of a close approach between two planetary cosmic bodies, as Plato
Plato
suggested in Timaeus,[2] or, according to Victor Clube, meteors,[3] though this is not currently the case. As a divine manifestation the thunderbolt has been a powerful symbol throughout history, and has appeared in many mythologies
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Folk Etymology
Folk etymology or reanalysis – sometimes called pseudo-etymology, popular etymology, or analogical reformation – is a change in a word or phrase resulting from the replacement of an unfamiliar form by a more familiar one.[1][2][3] The form or the meaning of an archaic, foreign, or otherwise unfamiliar word is reanalyzed as resembling more familiar words or morphemes. Rebracketing is a form of folk etymology in which a word is broken down or "bracketed" into a new set of supposed elements
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Oceanus
Oceanus
Oceanus
(/oʊˈsiːənəs/; Greek: Ὠκεανός Ōkeanós,[1] pronounced [ɔːkeanós]), also known as Ogenus (Ὤγενος Ōgenos or Ὠγηνός Ōgēnos) or Ogen (Ὠγήν Ōgēn),[2] was a divine figure in classical antiquity, believed by the ancient Greeks and Romans to be the divine personification of the sea, an enormous river encircling the world.Contents1 Etymology 2 Mythological account 3 Iconography 4 In cosmography and geography 5 Genealogical chart 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEtymology[edit] Oceanus
Oceanus
attending the Wedding of Peleus
Peleus
and Thetis
Thetis
on an Athenian, black-figure Dinos
Dinos
by Sophilos, c. 590 BC (British Museum)R. S. P
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Luwian Language
Luwian /ˈluːiən/ sometimes known as Luvian or Luish is an ancient language, or group of languages, within the Anatolian branch of the Indo-European language family. The ethnonym Luwian comes from Luwiya (also spelled Luwia or Luvia) – the name of the region in which the Luwians
Luwians
lived. Luwiya is attested, for example, in the Hittite laws.[2] The two varieties of Proto-Luwian or Luwian (in the narrow sense of these names), are known after the scripts in which they were written: Cuneiform Luwian
Cuneiform Luwian
(CLuwian) and Hieroglyphic Luwian
Hieroglyphic Luwian
(HLuwian)
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Hittite Language
Hittite (natively 𒉈𒅆𒇷 nešili "[in the language] of Neša"), also known as Nesite and Neshite, is the extinct language once spoken by the Hittites, an Indo-European-speaking people who created an empire centred on Hattusa
Hattusa
in north-central Anatolia
Anatolia
(modern-day Turkey). The language is attested in cuneiform, in records dating from the 16th (Anitta text) to the 13th century BC, with isolated Hittite loanwords and numerous personal names appearing in an Old Assyrian context from as early as the 20th century BC. By the Late Bronze Age, Hittite had started losing ground to its close relative Luwian
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Cilicia
In antiquity, Cilicia
Cilicia
(/sɪˈlɪʃiə/)[2][note 1] was the south coastal region of Asia Minor
Asia Minor
and existed as a political entity from Hittite times into the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia
Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia
during the late Byzantine Empire
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Robin Lane Fox
Robin James Lane Fox, FRSL (born 5 October 1946[1]), is an English classicist, ancient historian and gardening writer known for his works on Alexander the Great.[2] Lane Fox is an Emeritus Fellow of New College, Oxford and Reader in Ancient History, University of Oxford. Fellow and Tutor in Ancient History at New College from 1977 to 2014, he serves as Garden Master and as Extraordinary Lecturer
Lecturer
in Ancient History for both New and Exeter Colleges. He has also taught Greek and Latin literature
Latin literature
and early Islamic history.[3][4] His major publications, for which he has won literary prizes including the James Tait Black Award,[5] the Duff Cooper Prize,[6] the Heinemann Award[7] and the Runciman Award,[8] include studies of Alexander the Great and Ancient Macedon, Late Antiquity, Christianity and Paganism,[9] the Bible and history, and the Greek Dark Ages
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Antoninus Liberalis
Antoninus Liberalis
Antoninus Liberalis
(Greek: Ἀντωνῖνος Λιβεράλις) was an Ancient Greek grammarian who probably flourished between AD 100 and 300. His only surviving work is the Metamorphoses (Μεταμορφώσεων Συναγωγή, Metamorphoseon Synagoge, literally "Collection of Transformations"), a collection of forty-one very briefly summarised tales about mythical metamorphoses effected by offended deities, unique in that they are couched in prose, not verse. The literary genre of myths of transformations of men and women, heroes and nymphs, into stars (see Catasterismi), plants and animals, or springs, rocks and mountains, were widespread and popular in the classical world. This work has more polished parallels in the better-known Metamorphoses of Ovid
Ovid
and in the Metamorphoses of Lucius Apuleius
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Mountain
A mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges. High elevations on mountains produce colder climates than at sea level
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Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(/æfrəˈdaɪti/ ( listen) af-rə-DY-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη Aphrodítē) is the ancient Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans. The cult of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was largely derived from that of the Phoenician goddess Astarte, a cognate of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar, whose cult was based on the Sumerian cult of Inanna. Aphrodite's main cult centers were Cythera, Cyprus, Corinth, and Athens. Her main festival was the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated annually in midsummer. In Laconia, Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was worshipped as a warrior goddess
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Max Littmann
Max Littmann
Max Littmann
(3 January 1862 – 20 September 1931) was a German architect.Max Littmann, Portrait 1912Hofbräuhaus in Munich
Munich
1896-1897Opera house in Poznań
Poznań
1909-1910Opera house in Stuttgart
Stuttgart
1909-1912Regentenbau (concert hall) in Bad Kissingen
Bad Kissingen
1910-1913Littmann was educated in the Gewerbeakademie Chemnitz and the Technische Hochschule Dresden
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Uranus (mythology)
Uranus
Uranus
(/ˈjʊərənəs, jʊəˈreɪnəs/; Ancient Greek Οὐρανός, Ouranos [uranós] meaning "sky" or "heaven") was the primal Greek god personifying the sky. His name in Roman mythology
Roman mythology
was Caelus.[2] In Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
literature, Uranus
Uranus
or Father Sky
Sky
was the son and husband of Gaia, Mother Earth. According to Hesiod's Theogony, Uranus
Uranus
was conceived by Gaia alone, but other sources cite Aether as his father.[3] Uranus
Uranus
and Gaia were the parents of the first generation of Titans, and the ancestors of most of the Greek gods, but no cult addressed directly to Uranus
Uranus
survived into Classical times,[4] and Uranus
Uranus
does not appear among the usual themes of Greek painted pottery
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Cronus
In Greek mythology, Cronus, Cronos, or Kronos (/ˈkroʊnəs/ or /ˈkroʊnɒs/ from Greek: Κρόνος, Krónos), was the leader and youngest of the first generation of Titans, the divine descendants of Uranus, the sky, and Gaia, the earth. He overthrew his father and ruled during the mythological Golden Age, until he was overthrown by his own son Zeus
Zeus
and imprisoned in Tartarus
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Nyx
Nyx
Nyx
(/nɪks/;[1] Ancient Greek: Νύξ, "Night";[2] Latin: Nox) is the Greek goddess (or personification) of the night. A shadowy figure, Nyx stood at or near the beginning of creation and mothered other personified deities such as Hypnos
Hypnos
(Sleep) and Thanatos
Thanatos
(Death), with Erebus
Erebus
(Darkness)
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