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Peerage Of Scotland
The Peerage of Scotland
Scotland
(Scottish Gaelic: Moraireachd na h-Alba) is the section of the Peerage of the British Isles for those peers created by the King of Scots
King of Scots
before 1707. Following that year's Treaty of Union, the Kingdom of Scots and the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
were combined under the name of Great Britain, and a new Peerage of Great Britain was introduced in which subsequent titles were created. After the Union, the Peers of the ancient Parliament of Scotland elected 16 representative peers to sit in the House of Lords
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Royal Assent
Royal assent
Royal assent
or sanction is the method by which a country's monarch (possibly through a delegated official) formally approves an act of that nation's parliament. In certain nations, such assent makes the act law (promulgation) while in other nations assent is distinct from promulgation. In the vast majority of contemporary monarchies, this act is considered to be little more than a formality; even in those nations which still permit their monarchs to withhold royal assent (such as the United Kingdom, Norway, and Liechtenstein), the monarch almost never does so, save in a dire political emergency or upon the advice of their government. While the power to withhold royal assent was once exercised often in European monarchies, it is exceedingly rare in the modern, democratic political atmosphere that has developed there since the 18th century. Royal assent
Royal assent
is sometimes associated with elaborate ceremonies
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Scottish Gaelic Language
Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic (Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlikʲ] ( listen)) or the Gaelic, is a Celtic language native to the Gaels
Gaels
of Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic-speaking, as evidenced especially by Gaelic-language placenames.[3] In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001
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Parliament Of Scotland
The Parliament of Scotland
Scotland
was the legislature of the Kingdom of Scotland. The parliament, like other such institutions, evolved during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
from the king's council of bishops and earls. It is first identifiable as a parliament in 1235, during the reign of Alexander II, when it was described as a "colloquium" and already possessed a political and judicial role. By the early fourteenth century, the attendance of knights and freeholders had become important, and from 1326 commissioners from the burghs attended. Consisting of the "three estates" of clergy, nobility and the burghs sitting in a single chamber, the parliament gave consent for the raising of taxation and played an important role in the administration of justice, foreign policy, war, and all manner of other legislation. Parliamentary business was also carried out by "sister" institutions, such as General Councils or Convention of Estates
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Earl Of Doncaster
Doncaster (/ˈdɒŋkəstər/[1] or /ˈdɒŋkæstər/) is a large market town in South Yorkshire, England. Together with its surrounding suburbs and settlements, the town forms part of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster, which had a mid-2016 est. population of 306,400.[2] The town itself has a population of 109,805 [3] The Doncaster Urban Area had a population of 158,141 in 2011[citation needed] and includes Doncaster and neighbouring small villages. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire until 1974, Doncaster is about 17 miles (30 km) north-east of Sheffield, with which it is served by an international airport, Doncaster Sheffield Airport in Finningley
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Viscount Of Arbuthnott
Arbuthnott (from Scottish Gaelic Obar Bhuadhnait, meaning 'mouth of the Buadhnat')[1] is a small village in northeast Scotland, 26 miles south of Aberdeen. It is located on the B967 east of Fordoun (on the A90) and north-west of Inverbervie (on the A92) in Aberdeenshire.[2] The nearest train station is Stonehaven.Arbuthnott ChurchThe most obvious feature in the village is the 13th Century Parish Church of St. Ternan[3] in which the Missal of Arbuthnott was written.The Grassic Gibbon CentreMemorial to Lewis Grassic Gibbon in Arbuthnott kirkyardLewis Grassic Gibbon hailed from the area and wrote about life in The Mearns
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Marquis
A marquess (UK: /ˈmɑːrkwɪs/;[1] French: marquis, [mɑʁki];[2] Italian: marchese, Spanish: marqués, Portuguese: marquês) is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The term is also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in imperial China and Japan. In the German lands, a Margrave
Margrave
was a ruler of an immediate Imperial territory (examples include the Margrave
Margrave
of Brandenburg, the Margrave of Baden and the Margrave
Margrave
of Bayreuth), not simply a nobleman like a marquess or marquis in Western and Southern Europe
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Scottish Independence Referendum, 2014
A referendum on Scottish independence
Scottish independence
from the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
took place on 18 September 2014.[1] The referendum question, which voters answered with "Yes" or "No", was "Should Scotland
Scotland
be an independent country?"[2] The "No" side won, with 2,001,926 (55.3%) voting against independence and 1,617,989 (44.7%) voting in favour. The turnout of 84.6% was the highest recorded for an election or referendum in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
since the introduction of universal suffrage. The Scottish Independence Referendum Act 2013, setting out the arrangements for the referendum, was passed by the Scottish Parliament in November 2013, following an agreement between the Scottish government and the British government. To pass, the independence proposal required a simple majority
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Kingdom Of England
Unitary parliamentary monarchy (1215–1707)Monarch •  927–939 Æthelstan
Æthelstan
(first)[a] •  1702–1707 Anne (last)[b]Legislature Parliament •  Upper house House of Lords •  Lower house House of CommonsHistory •  Unification 10th century •  Battle of Hastings 14 October 1066 •  Conquered Wales 1277–1283 •  Incorporated Wales 1535–1542 •  Union of the Crowns 24 March 1603 •  Glorious Revolution 11 December 1688 
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Treaty Of Union 1707
The Treaty of Union
Treaty of Union
is the name usually now given to the agreement which led to the creation of the new state of Great Britain, stating that England (which already included Wales) and Scotland were to be "United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain",[1] At the time it was more often referred to as the Articles of Union. The details of the Treaty were agreed on 22 July 1706, and separate Acts of Union were then passed by the parliaments of England and Scotland to put the agreed Articles into effect
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Duke Of Cornwall
Duke of Cornwall
Cornwall
is a title in the Peerage of England, traditionally held by the eldest son of the reigning British monarch, previously the English monarch. The Duchy of Cornwall
Duchy of Cornwall
was the first duchy created in England and was established by royal charter in 1337. The present duke is the Prince of Wales, the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II
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Prince Of Wales
Prince of Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Tywysog Cymru) was a title granted to princes born in Wales
Wales
from the 12th century onwards; the term replaced the use of the word king. One of the last Welsh princes, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, was killed in battle in 1282 by Edward I, King of England, whose son Edward (born in Caernarfon Castle
Caernarfon Castle
in Wales) was invested as the first English Prince of Wales
Wales
in 1301. Since the 14th century, the title has been a dynastic title granted to the heir apparent to the English or British monarch, but the failure to be granted the title does not affect the rights to royal succession. The title is granted to the heir apparent as a personal honour or dignity, and is not heritable, merging with the Crown on accession to the throne
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Marquess
A marquess (UK: /ˈmɑːrkwɪs/;[1] French: marquis, [mɑʁki];[2] Italian: marchese, Spanish: marqués, Portuguese: marquês) is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The term is also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in imperial China and Japan. In the German lands, a Margrave
Margrave
was a ruler of an immediate Imperial territory (examples include the Margrave
Margrave
of Brandenburg, the Margrave of Baden and the Margrave
Margrave
of Bayreuth), not simply a nobleman like a marquess or marquis in Western and Southern Europe
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Baron Hamilton Of Hameldon
Baron Hamilton of Hameldon, of Hambledon in the County of Leicester, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain, held by the Duke of Hamilton from 1790 to 1799 and by the Duke of Argyll since 1799.[2] It was created in 1776 for Elizabeth Campbell (née Gunning), Duchess of Hamilton, wife since 1752 of James Douglas-Hamilton, 6th Duke of Hamilton. The Duke of Hamilton died in 1758, and his widow remarried the following year, to John Campbell, who later became Marquess of Lorne in 1761 and 5th Duke of Argyll in 1770. She died in 1790, and her Barony passed to her only surviving son from her first marriage, the 8th Duke of Hamilton. On his death without male issue, the barony passed to his half-brother the Marquess of Lorne, the Duchess's eldest surviving son by her second marriage
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Robes Of The British Peerage
Peerage robes are worn in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
by peers and are of two varieties for two occasions: Parliament robes, worn on ceremonial occasions in the House of Lords, and Coronation robes, worn in the House of Lords
House of Lords
at coronations of monarchs. Peers wear a robe differentiated by features identifying their rank.Contents1 History1.1 Parliament robes1.1.1 Lords Temporal 1.1.2 Lords Spiritual1.2 Coronation robes1.2.1 Peers 1.2.2 Peeresses2 ReferencesHistory[edit] Since the early Middle Ages, robes have been worn as a sign of nobility
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Earl
An earl /ɜːrl/[1] is a member of the nobility. The title is Anglo-Saxon in origin, akin to the Scandinavian form jarl, and meant "chieftain", particularly a chieftain set to rule a territory in a king's stead. In Scandinavia, it became obsolete in the Middle Ages and was replaced by duke (hertig/hertug/hertog). In later medieval Britain, it became the equivalent of the continental count (in England in the earlier period, it was more akin to a duke; in Scotland
Scotland
it assimilated the concept of mormaer). However, earlier in Scandinavia, jarl could also mean a sovereign prince.[citation needed] For example, the rulers of several of the petty kingdoms of Norway had the title of jarl and in many cases they had no less power than their neighbours who had the title of king
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