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Peak Wildlife Park
Coordinates: 53°03′40″N 1°55′25″W / 53.06111°N 1.92361°W / 53.06111; -1.92361Peak Wildlife ParkDate opened 1991 (as Blackbrook Zoological Park)Location Winkhill, Staffordshire, EnglandCoordinates 53°03′40″N 1°55′25″W / 53.06111°N 1.92361°W / 53.06111; -1.92361Land area 75 acres (30 ha)No. of species 17Website www.peakwildlifepark.co.uk Peak Wildlife Park
Peak Wildlife Park
is a zoo in central England. The nearest towns are Leek, Ashbourne and Stoke-on-Trent. The zoo was originally known as Blackbrook Zoological Park, but entered administration in 2014 and closed
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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White Naped Crane
The white-naped crane (Antigone vipio) is a bird of the crane family. It is a large bird, 112–125 cm (44–49 in) long, approximately 130 cm (4.3 ft) tall and weighing about 5.6 kg (12 lb) with pinkish legs, grey and white striped neck, and a red face patch. The white-naped crane breeds in northeastern Mongolia, northeastern China, and adjacent areas of southeastern Russia where a program at Khingan Nature Reserve raises eggs provided from U.S. zoos to bolster the species. Different groups of the birds migrate to winter near the Yangtze River, the DMZ in Korea and on Kyūshū in Japan. They also reach Kazakhstan and Taiwan. Only about 4,900 and 5,400 individuals remain in the wild. Its diet consists mainly of insects, seeds, roots, plants and small animals. Due to ongoing habitat loss and overhunting in some areas, the white-naped crane is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.[1] It is listed on Appendix I and II of CITES
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Dik-dik
A dik-dik (/dɪkdɪk/[2]) is the name for any of four species of small antelope in the genus Madoqua that live in the bushlands of eastern and southern Africa. Dik-diks stand about 30–40 centimetres (12–15.5 in) at the shoulder, are 50–70 cm (19.5–27.5 in) long, weigh 3–6 kilograms (6.6–13.2 lb) and can live for up to 10 years. Dik-diks are named for the alarm calls of the females. In addition to the females' alarm call, both the male and female make a shrill, whistling sound. These calls may alert other animals to predators.Contents1 Name 2 Physical characteristics 3 Habitat 4 Diet 5 Reproduction 6 Predators 7 Species 8 ReferencesName The name dik-dik comes from an onomatopoeia of the repetitive dik sound female dik-diks whistle through their long, tubular snouts when they feel threatened.[2] Physical characteristics Female dik-diks are somewhat larger than males
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Ring-tailed Lemur
Genus:[3][4]Prosimia Brisson, 1762[N 1] Procebus Storr, 1780 Catta Link, 1806[N 2] Maki Muirhead, 1819[N 3] Mococo Trouessart, 1878[N 4] Odorlemur Bolwig, 1960Species:[3][4]Maki mococo Muirhead, 1819[N 5]The ring-tailed lemur ( Lemur
Lemur
catta) is a large strepsirrhine primate and the most recognized lemur due to its long, black and white ringed tail. It belongs to Lemuridae, one of five lemur families, and is the only member of the Lemur
Lemur
genus. Like all lemurs it is endemic to the island of Madagascar. Known locally in Malagasy as maky ([makʲ] ( listen), spelled maki in French) or hira, it inhabits gallery forests to spiny scrub in the southern regions of the island. It is omnivorous and the most terrestrial of extant lemurs. The animal is diurnal, being active exclusively in daylight hours. The ring-tailed lemur is highly social, living in groups of up to 30 individuals
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Patagonian Mara
The Patagonian mara
Patagonian mara
( Dolichotis
Dolichotis
patagonum) is a relatively large rodent in the mara genus (Dolichotis).[3] It is also known as the Patagonian cavy, Patagonian hare or dillaby. This herbivorous, somewhat rabbit-like animal is found in open and semi-open habitats in Argentina, including large parts of Patagonia. It is monogamous, but often breeds in warrens that are shared by several pairs.Contents1 Description 2 Ecology and activity 3 Social behavior and reproduction 4 Status 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription[edit] The Patagonian mara
Patagonian mara
resembles a jackrabbit.[4] It has distinctive long ears and long limbs. Its hind limbs are longer and more muscular than its forelimbs and it has a longer radius than humerus.[5] The feet are compressed, making them hoof-like. The forefeet have 4 digits while the hind feet have 3 digits
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Brown Lemur
True lemurs, also known as brown lemurs, are the lemurs in genus Eulemur. They are medium-sized primates that live exclusively on Madagascar. The fur of the true lemurs is long and usually reddish brown. Often there is sexual dimorphism in coloration (sexual dichromatism), such as in the black lemur. True lemurs are from 30 to 50 cm (12 to 20 in) in length, with a tail that is as long or significantly longer than the body. They weigh from 2 to 4 kg (4 to 9 lb). True lemurs are predominantly diurnal forest inhabitants, with some species preferring rain forests, while others live in dry forests. They are skillful climbers and can cross large distances in trees by jumping, using their non-prehensile tails to aid in balancing. When on the ground, they move almost exclusively on all four legs. True lemurs are social animals and live together in groups of two to 15 members. The diet of the true lemurs is almost exclusively herbivorous: flowers, fruits and leaves
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Maneless Zebra
The maneless zebra (Equus quagga borensis) is a subspecies of the plains zebra, spread over the northern parts of eastern Africa. It ranges in north-west Kenya, from Guas ngishu and Lake Baringo
Lake Baringo
to the Karamoja
Karamoja
district of Uganda. It is also found in eastern South Sudan, east of the Nile River, for example in Boma National Park
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Wallaby
A wallaby is a small- or mid-sized macropod found in Australia
Australia
and New Guinea. They belong to the same taxonomic family as kangaroos and sometimes the same genus, but kangaroos are specifically categorised into the six largest species of the family. The term wallaby is an informal designation generally used for any macropod that is smaller than a kangaroo or wallaroo that has not been designated otherwise.[1] There are 11 species of brush wallabies (g. Macropus, s.g. Protemnodon). Their head and body length is 45 to 105 cm and the tail is 33 to 75 cm long. The six named species of rock-wallabies (g. Petrogale) live among rocks, usually near water; two species are endangered. The two species of hare-wallabies (g
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Zoo
A zoo (short for zoological garden or zoological park and also called an animal park or menagerie) is a facility in which animals are housed within enclosures, displayed to the public, and in which they may also breed. The term "zoological garden" refers to zoology, the study of animals, a term deriving from the Greek zōon (ζῷον, 'animal') and lógos (λóγος, 'study')
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Black And White Ruffed Lemur
V. v. variegata (Kerr, 1792) V. v. editorum (Osman Hill, 1953) V. v. subcincta (A. Smith, 1833)Distribution of Varecia variegata[1]SynonymsV. v. variegata:vari Muirhead, 1819 varius I. Geoffroy, 1851[4]The black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) is a Critically Endangered species of ruffed lemur, the more endangered one of two which are endemic to the island of Madagascar. Despite having a larger range than the red ruffed lemur, it has a much smaller population that is spread out, living in lower population densities and reproductively isolated. It also has less coverage and protection in large national parks than the red ruffed lemur
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Meerkat
The meerkat or suricate (Suricata suricatta) is a small carnivoran belonging to the mongoose family (Herpestidae). It is the only member of the genus Suricata.[3] Meerkats live in all parts of the Kalahari Desert in Botswana, in much of the Namib Desert
Namib Desert
in Namibia
Namibia
and southwestern Angola, and in South Africa. A group of meerkats is called a "mob", "gang" or "clan". A meerkat clan often contains about 20 meerkats, but some super-families have 50 or more members
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Sandhill Crane
and see textSynonymsArdea canadensis Linnaeus, 1758 Grus minor Grus proavus Grus canadensis and see textAntigone canadensisUSFWS RecordingProblems playing this file? See media help.The sandhill crane (Antigone canadensis) is a species of large crane of North America
North America
and extreme northeastern Siberia. The common name of this bird refers to habitat like that at the Platte River, on the edge of Nebraska's Sandhills on the American Plains
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Black-necked Crane
The black-necked crane (Grus nigricollis) is a medium-sized crane in Asia that breeds on the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
and remote parts of India
India
and Bhutan. It is 139 cm (55 in) long with a 235 cm (7.8 ft) wingspan, and it weighs 5.5 kg (12 lbs). It is whitish-gray, with a black head, red crown patch, black upper neck and legs, and white patch to the rear of the eye. It has black primaries and secondaries. Both sexes are similar. Some populations are known to make seasonal movements. It is revered in Buddhist traditions and culturally protected across much of its range
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Demoiselle Crane
The demoiselle crane (Grus virgo) is a species of crane found in central Eurasia, ranging from the Black Sea to Mongolia and North Eastern China. There is also a small breeding population in Turkey. These cranes are migratory birds. Birds from western Eurasia
Eurasia
will spend the winter in Africa
Africa
whilst the birds from Asia, Mongolia and China will spend the winter in the Indian subcontinent. The bird is symbolically significant in the Culture of India and Pakistan, where it is known as Koonj.[2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Life 3 Symbolism in North Indian culture 4 References 5 External linksCharacteristics[edit]Individual from Tal Chhapar Sanctuary, Churu, RajasthanThe demoiselle is 85–100 cm (33.5–39.5 in) long, 76 cm (30 in) tall and has a 155–180 cm (61–71 in) wingspan. It weighs 2–3 kg (4.4–6.6 lb)
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Wattled Crane
The wattled crane (Grus carunculata) is a large bird found in Africa, south of the Sahara Desert. It is sometimes placed in the monotypic genus Bugeranus.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Range 4 Habitat and diet 5 Behavior 6 Threats 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksTaxonomy[edit] The first formal description of the wattled crane was by the German naturalist Johann Friedrich Gmelin
Johann Friedrich Gmelin
in 1789 under the binomial name Ardea carunculata.[2][3] Gmelin based his account on the "wattled heron" that had been described and illustrated by the English ornithologist John Latham in 1785.[4] The specific epithet is from the Latin caruncula meaning "a small piece of flesh".[5] The wattled crane was formerly placed in its own genus Bugeranus
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