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Peace Of Zsitvatorok
The Peace of Zsitvatorok
Peace of Zsitvatorok
(or Treaty of Sitvatorok) was a peace treaty which ended the Fifteen Years' War between the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and the Habsburg Monarchy
Habsburg Monarchy
on 11 November 1606
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Hungarian Declaration Of Independence
The Hungarian Declaration of Independence declared the independence of Hungary from the Habsburg Monarchy during the Hungarian Revolution of 1848. It was presented to the National Assembly in closed session on 13 April 1849 by Lajos Kossuth, and in open session the following day, despite political opposition from within the Hungarian Peace Party. The declaration was passed unanimously the following day.[1][2] Kossuth issued the declaration himself, from the Protestant Great Church of Debrecen. The declaration accused the Habsburgs of crimes, sayingThe House of Lorraine-Habsburg is unexampled in the compass of its perjuries […] Its determination to extinguish the independents of Hungary has been accompanied by a succession of criminal acts, comprising robbery, destruction of property by fire, murder, maiming […] Humanity will shudder when reading this disgraceful page of history
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John Henry, Margrave Of Moravia
John Henry of Luxembourg (Czech: Jan Jindřich, German: Johann Heinrich; 12 February 1322 – 12 November 1375),[1] a member of the House of Luxembourg, was Count of Tyrol from 1335 to 1341 and Margrave of Moravia from 1349 until his death.Contents1 Biography 2 Genealogy 3 Ancestry 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Henry was born at Mělník, the third surviving son of King John of Bohemia (1296–1346) and his consort, the Přemyslid princess Elizabeth (1292–1330). John Henry therefore was the younger brother of Emperor Charles IV
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Bernard Lewis
Bernard Lewis, FBA (born 31 May 1916) is a British American
British American
historian specializing in oriental studies. He is also known as a public intellectual and political commentator. Lewis is the Cleveland E. Dodge Professor Emeritus of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. Lewis' expertise is in the history of Islam
Islam
and the interaction between Islam
Islam
and the West. He is also noted in academic circles for his works on the history of the Ottoman Empire.[1] Lewis served as a soldier in the British Army in the Royal Armoured Corps and Intelligence Corps during the Second World War
Second World War
before being seconded to the Foreign Office
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Magyars
Hungarians, also known as Magyars
Magyars
(Hungarian: magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group native to Hungary
Hungary
(Hungarian: Magyarország) and historical Hungarian lands who share a common culture, history and speak the Hungarian language. There are an estimated 13.1–14.7 million ethnic Hungarians
Hungarians
and their descendants worldwide, of whom 8.5–9.8 million live in today's Hungary
Hungary
(as of 2011).[25] About 2.2 million Hungarians
Hungarians
live in areas that were part of the Kingdom of Hungary
Hungary
before the 1918–1920 dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy and the Treaty of Trianon, and are now parts of Hungary's seven neighbouring countries, especially Romania, Austria, Slovakia, Serbia
Serbia
and Ukraine
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Árpád Dynasty
The Árpáds or Arpads (Hungarian: Árpádok, Croatian: Arpadovići, Serbian: Арпадовци, translit. Arpadovci, Slovak: Arpádovci, Turkish: Arpatlar) was the ruling dynasty of the Principality of Hungary
Principality of Hungary
in the 9th and 10th centuries and of the Kingdom of Hungary
Kingdom of Hungary
from 1000 to 1301
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Pacta Conventa (Croatia)
Pacta conventa (Lat. agreed accords) was an alleged agreement concluded between King Coloman of Hungary
Coloman of Hungary
and the Croatian nobility
Croatian nobility
in 1102 or afterwards, defining the status of Croatia
Croatia
in the union with Hungary. The earliest manuscript of the document is of the fourteenth century. The document titled Pacta conventa or Qualiter (the first word in the document) was found in a Trogir
Trogir
library.[1] Until the 19th century it was considered that it dated to 1102
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Peace Treaty
A peace treaty is an agreement between two or more hostile parties, usually countries or governments, which formally ends a state of war between the parties. It is different from an armistice, which is an agreement to stop hostilities, or a surrender, in which an army agrees to give up arms, or a ceasefire or truce in which the parties may agree to temporarily or permanently stop fighting.Contents1 Elements of treaties 2 Role of the United Nations2.1 Peace
Peace
treaty under United Nations 2.2 Post-conflict elections3 Historic Peace
Peace
Treaties3.1 Ancient history 3.2 Modern history4 See also 5 References 6 External linksElements of treaties[edit] A treaty's content usually depends on the nature of the conflict being concluded
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Ottoman Hungary
Ottoman Hungary
Hungary
was the territory of southern Medieval Hungary
Medieval Hungary
which was ruled by the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
from 1541 to 1699
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Neapolitan Campaigns Of Louis The Great
The Neapolitan campaigns of Louis the Great, also called the Neapolitan Adventure (Nápolyi kaland in Hungarian), was a war between the Kingdom of Hungary, led by Louis the Great, and the Kingdom of Naples. It was fought from 1347 until 1352.Contents1 Preliminaries 2 The war 3 Aftermath 4 Footnotes 5 ReferencesPreliminaries[edit] In 1343 Robert I the Sage, King of Naples, died. His only son, Charles of Calabria, had died in 1328, leaving two daughters, one of which, Joan, had been married to Andrew, son of king Charles I of Hungary. During his time in Naples, Andrew's more refined wife developed a fierce hostility towards him
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Catherine The Great
Catherine II (Russian: Екатерина Алексеевна Yekaterina Alekseyevna; 2 May [O.S. 21 April] 1729 – 17 November [O.S. 6 November] 1796), also known as Catherine the Great (Екатери́на Вели́кая, Yekaterina Velikaya), born Princess Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst, was Empress
Empress
of Russia from 1762 until 1796, the country's longest-ruling female leader. She came to power following a coup d'état when her husband, Peter III, was assassinated. Under her reign, Russia was revitalised; it grew larger and stronger, and was recognised as one of the great powers of Europe. In her accession to power and her rule of the empire, Catherine often relied on her noble favourites, most notably Grigory Orlov
Grigory Orlov
and Grigory Potemkin
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War Of The Priests (Poland)
The War of the Priests (1467-1479, German: Pfaffenkrieg, Polish: wojna popia, wojna księża) was a conflict in the Polish province of Warmia between the King of Poland Casimir IV and Nicolaus von Tüngen, the new bishop of Warmia
Warmia
chosen – without the king's approval – by the Warmian chapter. The latter was supported by the Teutonic Knights, by this point vassals of Poland, who were seeking a revision of the recently signed Second Peace of Toruń.Contents1 Political background 2 Election dispute 3 Military action 4 SettlementPolitical background[edit] The Bishopric of Warmia
Warmia
was, in the 14th century, part of the Monastic State of the Teutonic Knights, but enjoyed autonomy and was administrated as a prince-bishopric
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Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
The Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
Eastern Hungarian Kingdom
(in Hungarian: Keleti Magyar Királyság) is a modern term used by historians to designate the realm of John Zápolya
John Zápolya
and his son John Sigismund Zápolya, who contested the claims of the House of Habsburg
House of Habsburg
to rule the Kingdom of Hungary from 1526 to 1570. The Zápolyas ruled over an eastern part of Hungary, while the Habsburg kings (Ferdinand and Maximilian) ruled the west. [2] The Habsburgs
Habsburgs
tried several times to unite all Hungary under their rule, but the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
prevented this by supporting the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom.[3] The exact extent of the Zápolya realm was never settled, because the Habsburgs
Habsburgs
and the Zápolyas both claimed the whole kingdom
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Great Turkish War
 Holy Roman Empire Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth Tsardom of Russia Cossack HetmanateKingdom of Croatia Kingdom of Hungary Republic of Venice Duchy of Mantua  Spanish Empire Prince-Bishopric of Montenegro Serbian rebels Albanian rebels Greek rebels Bulgarian rebels Ottoman Empire Vassal states: Crimean Khanate Upper Hungary
Hungary
(1683-5)  Moldavia  Wallachia  Transylvaniav t eGreat Turkish WarVienna Párkány Esztergom Vác 1st Buda Santa Maura Coron Érsekújvár Eperjes Kassa Navarino Modon 2nd Buda Nauplia Pécs Patras Mohács Acropolis 1st Crimean Negroponte 1st Belgrade Batočina 2nd Cri
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Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon
Napoleon
I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution
French Revolution
and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition
Third Coalition
(1805), the Fourth (1806–07), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815). Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France
France
in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army
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