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Paul Newham
Paul Newham
Paul Newham
(born 16 March 1962) is known for developing applications of voice, sound, and music in psychotherapy, psychology, music therapy, and audio therapy.[1][2][3]Contents1 Childhood Influence 2 Early Work in Expressive Therapy 3 Later Work in Receptive Therapy 4 Influence and Contributions4.1 Expressive Therapy 4.2 Receptive Therapy5 Selected publications5.1 Books 5.2 Articles6 ReferencesChildhood Influence[edit] Newham's biological father was Berthold Paul Wiesner, the physiologist known for coining the term 'Psi', now widely used to signify parapsychological phenomena, and who sired over six hundred childr
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Archivist
An archivist (AR-kiv-ist) is an information professional who assesses, collects, organizes, preserves, maintains control over, and provides access to records and archives determined to have long-term value
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Expressive Therapy
Expressive therapy, also known as the expressive therapies, expressive arts therapy or creative arts therapy, is the use of the creative arts as a form of therapy. Unlike traditional art expression, the process of creation is emphasized rather than the final product. Expressive therapy is predicated on the assumption that people can heal through use of imagination and the various forms of creative expression.Contents1 Types 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksTypes[edit] Expressive therapy is an umbrella term. Some common types of expressive therapy include:expressive arts therapy (in conjunction with one another, a truer understanding of healing comes into play between the use of various media to look at a situation or feeling) art therapy dance therapy, also known as dance/movement therapy drama therapy psychodrama an elaborate study of role play created and fostered by Jacob L
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Drama Therapy
Drama
Drama
therapy (written dramatherapy in the UK, Europe, Australia, and Africa) is the use of theatre techniques to facilitate personal growth and promote mental health.[1] Drama
Drama
therapy is used in a wide variety of settings, including hospitals, schools, mental health centers, prisons, and businesses. Drama
Drama
therapy, as a form of 'expressive therapy' (also known as creative arts therapies'),[2] exists in many forms and can be applicable to individuals, couples, families, and various groups.[3]Contents1 History 2 Core processes 3 Becoming a drama therapist 4 In practice 5 See also 6 References 7 External links7.1 Governing bodies 7.2 Other drama therapy-related websitesHistory[edit] The modern use of dramatic process and theatre as a therapeutic intervention began with Dr. Jacob L. Moreno's development of Psychodrama
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Music Therapy
Music
Music
therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program.[1] Music
Music
therapy is one of the expressive therapies, consisting of a process in which a music therapist uses music and all of its facets—physical, emotional, mental, social, aesthetic, and spiritual—to help clients improve their physical and mental health. Music
Music
therapists primarily help clients improve their health in several domains, such as cognitive functioning, motor skills, emotional development, communication, sensory, social skills, and quality of life by using both active and receptive music experiences such as improvisation, re-creation, composition, and listening and discussion of music to achieve treatment goals
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Disability
Disability
Disability
is an impairment that may be cognitive, developmental, intellectual, mental, physical, sensory, or some combination of these. It substantially affects a person's life activities and may be present from birth or occur during a person's lifetime. [1]Disabilities is an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. An impairment is a problem in body function or structure; an activity limitation is a difficulty encountered by an individual in executing a task or action; while a participation restriction is a problem experienced by an individual in involvement in life situations. Disability
Disability
is thus not just a health problem
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Phonation
The term phonation has slightly different meanings depending on the subfield of phonetics. Among some phoneticians, phonation is the process by which the vocal folds produce certain sounds through quasi-periodic vibration. This is the definition used among those who study laryngeal anatomy and physiology and speech production in general. Phoneticians in other subfields, such as linguistic phonetics, call this process voicing, and use the term phonation to refer to any oscillatory state of any part of the larynx that modifies the airstream, of which voicing is just one example
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Music
Music
Music
is an art form and cultural activity whose medium is sound organized in time. The common elements of music are pitch (which governs melody and harmony), rhythm (and its associated concepts tempo, meter, and articulation), dynamics (loudness and softness), and the sonic qualities of timbre and texture (which are sometimes termed the "color" of a musical sound). Different styles or types of music may emphasize, de-emphasize or omit some of these elements. Music
Music
is performed with a vast range of instruments and vocal techniques ranging from singing to rapping; there are solely instrumental pieces, solely vocal pieces (such as songs without instrumental accompaniment) and pieces that combine singing and instruments
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Communication
Communication
Communication
(from Latin commūnicāre, meaning "to share"[1]) is the act of conveying intended meanings from one entity or group to another through the use of mutually understood signs and semiotic rules. The main steps inherent to all communication are: [2]The formation of communicative motivation or reason. Message
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Psychological Pain
Psychological pain or mental pain is an unpleasant feeling (a suffering) of a psychological, non-physical, origin. A pioneer in the field of suicidology, Edwin S. Shneidman, described it as "how much you hurt as a human being. It is mental suffering; mental torment."[1] There is no shortage in the many ways psychological pain is referred to, and using a different word usually reflects an emphasis on a particular aspect of mind life
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Author
An author is the creator or originator of any written work such as a book or play, and is thus also a writer. More broadly defined, an author is "the person who originated or gave existence to anything" and whose authorship determines responsibility for what was created.[1]Contents1 Legal significance of authorship 2 Philosophical views of the nature of authorship 3 Relationship with publisher3.1 Self-publishing3.1.1 Types3.1.1.1 Electronic (e-book) publishing 3.1.1.2 Print-on-demand3.2 Traditional publishing 3.3 Vanity publishing4 Relationship with editor 5 Compensation 6 See also 7 ReferencesLegal significance of authorship[edit]A copyright certificate certifying the authorship for a proof of the Fermat theorem, issued by the State Department of Intellectual Property of Ukraine.Typically, the first owner of a copyright is the person who created the work i.e. the author
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Curator
A curator (from Latin: cura, meaning "to take care")[1] is a manager or overseer. Traditionally, a curator or keeper of a cultural heritage institution (e.g., gallery, museum, library, or archive) is a content specialist charged with an institution's collections and involved with the interpretation of heritage material. A traditional curator's concern necessarily involves tangible objects of some sort—artwork, collectibles, historic items, or scientific collections. More recently, new kinds of curators have started to emerge: curators of digital data objects and biocurators.Contents1 Curation scope 2 Education and training 3 Technology and society 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksCuration scope[edit] In smaller organizations, a curator may have sole responsibility for acquisitions and even for collections care
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Cognitive Psychology
Cognitive psychology
Cognitive psychology
is the study of mental processes such as "attention, language use, memory, perception, problem solving, creativity, and thinking".[1] Much of the work derived from cognitive psychology has been integrated into various other modern disciplines of psychological study, including educational psychology, social psychology, personality psychology, abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, and economics.Contents1 History 2 Mental processes2.1 Attention 2.2 Memory2.2.1 Working memory 2.2.2 Long-term memory2.3 Perception 2.4 Language 2.5 Metacognition3 Modern 4 Applications4.1 Abnormal psychology 4.2 Social psychology 4.3 Developmental psychology 4.4 Educational psychology 4.5 Personality psychology5 Cognitive psychology
Cognitive psychology
vs
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Sound Recording And Reproduction
Sound
Sound
recording and reproduction is an electrical, mechanical, electronic, or digital inscription and re-creation of sound waves, such as spoken voice, singing, instrumental music, or sound effects. The two main classes of sound recording technology are analog recording and digital recording. Acoustic analog recording is achieved by a microphone diaphragm that senses changes in atmospheric pressure caused by acoustic sound waves and records them as a mechanical representation of the sound waves on a medium such as a phonograph record (in which a stylus cuts grooves on a record). In magnetic tape recording, the sound waves vibrate the microphone diaphragm and are converted into a varying electric current, which is then converted to a varying magnetic field by an electromagnet, which makes a representation of the sound as magnetized areas on a plastic tape with a magnetic coating on it
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Diary
A diary is a record (originally in handwritten format) with discrete entries arranged by date reporting on what has happened over the course of a day or other period. A personal diary may include a person's experiences, and/or thoughts or feelings, including comments on current events outside the writer's direct experience. Someone who keeps a diary is known as a diarist. Diaries undertaken for institutional purposes play a role in many aspects of human civilization, including government records (e.g. Hansard), business ledgers and military records. In British English, the word may also denote a preprinted journal format. Today the term is generally employed for personal diaries, normally intended to remain private or to have a limited circulation amongst friends or relatives
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