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Paul Grant Rogers
Paul Grant Rogers (June 4, 1921 – October 13, 2008) was an American lawyer and politician from the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Florida. A Democrat, Rogers served in the U.S. House of Representatives as the member from Florida's 11th congressional district. He was chairman of Research America from 1996 to 2005.[1]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Political career2 Awards and honors 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Rogers was born in Ocilla, Georgia, on June 4, 1921. He attended the University of Florida, where he was President of Florida
Florida
Blue Key and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1942. After graduating he joined the U.S
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Paul Rogers (other)
Paul Rogers may refer to: Paul Rogers (politician)
Paul Rogers (politician)
(1921–2008), American lawyer and politician Paul Rogers (academic), professor of peace studies at the University of Bradford
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National Cancer Act Of 1971
The War on Cancer
Cancer
refers to the effort to find a cure for cancer by increased research to improve the understanding of cancer biology and the development of more effective cancer treatments, such as targeted drug therapies. The aim of such efforts is to eradicate cancer as a major cause of death
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Bronze Star Medal
The Bronze Star Medal, unofficially the Bronze Star, is a United States decoration awarded to members of the United States Armed Forces for either heroic achievement, heroic service, meritorious achievement, or meritorious service in a combat zone. Whenever the medal is awarded by the Army and Air Force for acts of valor in combat, the "V" Device
"V" Device
is authorized for wear on the medal, and whenever the medal is awarded by the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard for acts of valor or meritorious service in combat, the Combat "V" is authorized for wear on the medal. Officers from the other Uniformed Services of the United States are eligible to receive this award, as are foreign soldiers who have served with or alongside a service branch of the United States Armed Forces.[5][6] Civilians serving with U.S. military forces in combat are also eligible for the award
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The George Washington University Law School
The George Washington University
George Washington University
Law
Law
School (abbreviated as GW Law) is the law school of The George Washington
George Washington
University, in Washington, D.C. Founded in the 1820s, GW Law
Law
is the oldest law school in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and one of the most prestigious law schools in the United States.[4] GW Law
Law
is famous for its numerous prominent alumni, primarily within the fields of law and government, including a President of Georgia, a Minister of Foreign Affairs of India, a U.S. Attorney General, a Director-General of the World Intellectual Property
Property
Organization, a Director of the CIA, a Chief Justice of a U.S. State Supreme Court, 23 U.S. Congressmen, 5 U.S. State Governors, 4 Directors of the FBI, and 16 Federal judges. The 2019 U.S
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Juris Doctor
The Juris Doctor
Juris Doctor
degree (J.D. or JD), also known as the Doctor of Jurisprudence degree (J.D., JD, D.Jur. or DJur), is a graduate-entry professional degree in law[1][2][3][4][5] and one of several Doctor of Law
Law
degrees. It is earned by completing law school in Australia, Canada
Canada
and the United States, and some other common law countries
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Board Of Directors
A board of directors is a group of people who jointly supervise the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws. These authorities may specify the number of members of the board, how they are to be chosen, and how often they are to meet. In an organization with voting members, the board is accountable to, and might be subordinate to, the organization's full membership, which usually vote for the members of the board. In a stock corporation, non-executive directors are voted for by the shareholders, with the board having ultimate responsibility for the management of the corporation. The board of directors appoints the chief executive officer of the corporation and sets out the overall strategic direction
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Merck & Co.
Merck & Company, Inc. (NYSE: MRK), d.b.a. Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD) outside the United States and Canada, is an American pharmaceutical company and one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. The company was established in 1891 as the United States subsidiary of the German company Merck, which was founded in 1668 by the Merck family. Merck & Co. was expropriated by the US government during World War I
World War I
and subsequently established as an independent American company in 1917. While it operates as Merck & Co. in North America, the original Merck based in Darmstadt
Darmstadt
holds the rights to the Merck name everywhere else. Merck & Co. is the world's seventh largest pharmaceutical company by market capitalization and revenue. Its headquarters is located in Kenilworth, New Jersey.[4] Merck & Co
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Mutual Of New York
AXA
AXA
is a French multinational insurance firm headquartered in the 8th arrondissement of Paris
Paris
that engages in global insurance, investment management, and other financial services. The AXA
AXA
Group operates primarily in Western Europe, North America, the Asia Pacific region, and the Middle East, with presence also in Africa. AXA
AXA
is a conglomerate of independently run businesses, operated according to the laws and regulations of many different countries
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84th United States Congress
The Eighty-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate
United States Senate
and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1955, to January 3, 1957, during the third and fourth years of Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventeenth Census of the United States in 1950. Both chambers had a Democratic majority. It is the earliest Congress with a surviving member, former Michigan Representative John Dingell
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Special Election
By-elections, also spelled bye-elections (known as special elections in the United States, and bypolls in India), are used to fill elected offices that have become vacant between general elections. In most cases these elections occur after the incumbent dies or resigns, but they also occur when the incumbent becomes ineligible to continue in office (because of a recall, ennoblement, criminal conviction, or failure to maintain a minimum attendance). Less commonly, these elections have been called when a constituency election is invalidated by voting irregularities. In the United States, these contests have been called "special elections" because they do not always occur on Election
Election
Day like regular congressional elections
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96th United States Congress
The Ninety-sixth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate
United States Senate
and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
from January 3, 1979, to January 3, 1981, during the last two years of the administration of U.S. President Jimmy Carter. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the 1970 Census
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Medical Device Regulation Act
The Medical Device Regulation Act
Medical Device Regulation Act
or Medical Device Amendments of 1976 was introduced by the 94th Congress of the United States. Congressman Paul G. Rogers
Paul G. Rogers
and Senator Edward M. Kennedy
Edward M. Kennedy
were the chairperson sponsors of the medical device amendments.[1] The Title 21 amendments were signed into law on May 28, 1976 by the 38th President of the United States Gerald R. Ford.[2] The U.S. legislation enacted in 1976 amended the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938 signed by the 32nd President of the United States Franklin D. Roosevelt.[3]Contents1 History 2 Provisions of the Act 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] During the 1960s, the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) commissioned the Cooper Committee to study the adverse effects of medical devices for human use
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World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & North Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
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Clean Air Act (1970)
The Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. § 7401) is a United States federal law designed to control air pollution on a national level.[1] It is one of the United States' first and most influential modern environmental laws, and one of the most comprehensive air quality laws in the world.[2][3] As with many other major U.S. federal environmental statutes, it is administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in coordination with state, local, and tribal governments.[4] Its implementing regulations are codified at 40 C.F.R. Subchapter C, Parts 50-97. The 1955 Air Pollution Control Act
Air Pollution Control Act
was the first U.S. federal legislation that pertained to air pollution; it also provided funds for federal government research of air pollution.[4] The first federal legislation to actually pertain to "controlling" air pollution was the Clean Air Act of 1963.[5] The 1963 act accomplished this by establishing a federal program within the U.S
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West Palm Beach, Florida
West Palm Beach
West Palm Beach
is a city in and the county seat of Palm Beach County, Florida, United States.[6] It is located immediately to the west of the adjacent Palm Beach, and is one of the three main cities in South Florida. The population was 100,343 (revised) at the 2010 census. The University of Florida
Florida
Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) estimates a 2016 population of 108,896, a 7.9% increase from 2010. It is the oldest municipality in the Miami
Miami
metropolitan area, having been incorporated as a city two years before Miami
Miami
in November 1894. Although West Palm Beach
West Palm Beach
is located approximately 68 miles (109 km) north of Downtown Miami, it is still considered a principal city within the Miami
Miami
metropolitan area, due to the solid urbanization between both cities
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