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Paul Giéra
Paul Giéra
Paul Giéra
(22 January 1816 – 26 April 1861) was a French Provençal poet.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Death 4 Legacy 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Paul Giéra
Paul Giéra
was born on 22 January 1816 in Avignon.[1] His father was Jean Baptiste Joseph Giéra and his mother, Marie Madeleine Marguerite Crillon.[1] Career[edit] Giéra was the owner of the Château de Font-Ségugne
Château de Font-Ségugne
in Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne. On 21 May 1854, he invited Joseph Roumanille, Frédéric Mistral, Théodore Aubanel, Alphonse Tavan, Jean Brunet
Jean Brunet
and Anselme Mathieu, where they founded the Félibrige
Félibrige
movement.[2] Death[edit] He died on 26 April 1861 in his hometown of Avignon.[1] Legacy[edit] The Collège Paul Giéra
Paul Giéra
in Avignon
Avignon
was named in his honour
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Avignon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Avignon
Avignon
(French pronunciation: ​[avi'ɲɔ̃]; Latin: Avenio; Occitan: Avignoun, Occitan: Avinhon pronounced [aviˈɲun]) is a commune in south-eastern France
France
in the department of Vaucluse
Vaucluse
on the left bank of the Rhône
Rhône
river
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Vaucluse
The Vaucluse
Vaucluse
(French pronunciation: ​[vo.klyz] ; Occitan: Vauclusa in classical norm or Vau-Cluso in Mistralian norm) is a department in the southeast of France, named after the famous spring, the Fontaine de Vaucluse. The name Vaucluse
Vaucluse
derives from the Latin Vallis Clausa (closed valley) as the valley here ends in a cliff face from which emanates a spring whose origin is so far in and so deep that it remains to be defined.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Tourism 5 See also 6 External linksHistory[edit] Vaucluse
Vaucluse
was created on 12 August 1793 out of parts of the departments of Bouches-du-Rhône, Drôme, and Basses-Alpes (later renamed Alpes-de-Haute-Provence)
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Provence-Alpes-Côte D'Azur
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
(French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔvɑ̃s alp kot dazyʁ]; Occitan: Provença-Aups-Còsta d'Azur; Italian: Provenza-Alpi-Costa Azzurra; PACA) is one of the 18 administrative regions of France. Its capital is Marseille. The region is roughly coterminous with the former French province of Provence, with the addition of the following adjacent areas: the former papal territory of Avignon, known as Comtat Venaissin; the former Sardinian-Piedmontese county of Nice, whose coastline is known in English as the French Riviera, and in French as the Côte d'Azur; and the southeastern part of the former French province of Dauphiné, in the French Alps. 4,935,576 people live in the region according to the 2012 census. It encompasses six departments in south-eastern France: Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Alpes-Maritimes, Bouches-du-Rhône, Hautes-Alpes, Var and Vaucluse
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Provençal Dialect
Provençal /prɒvɒnˈsæl/[3] (Occitan: Provençau or Prouvençau [pʀuveⁿˈsaw]) is a variety of Occitan
Occitan
spoken by a minority of people in southern France, mostly in Provence. In the English-speaking world, the term Provençal has historically also been used to refer to all of Occitan, but is now mainly understood to refer to the variety spoken in Provence.[4][5] Provençal is also the customary name given to the older version of the Occitan language
Occitan language
used by the troubadours of medieval literature, while Old French
Old French
or the langue d'oïl was limited to the northern areas of France
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Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne
Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne
is a commune in the Vaucluse
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Frédéric Mistral
Frédéric Mistral
Frédéric Mistral
(French: [mistʁal]; Occitan: Frederic Mistral, 8 September 1830 – 25 March 1914) was a French writer and lexicographer of the Occitan
Occitan
language. Mistral received the 1904 Nobel Prize in Literature "in recognition of the fresh originality and true inspiration of his poetic production, which faithfully reflects the natural scenery and native spirit of his people, and, in addition, his significant work as a Provençal philologist"
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Théodore Aubanel
Théodore Aubanel (Occitan: Teodòr Aubanèu) (March 26, 1829 – November 2, 1886) was a Provençal poet. He was born in Avignon
Avignon
in a family of painters. Aubanel started writing poetry in French but quickly switched to Provençal, due to the influence of Joseph Roumanille. He is known primarily for La Miougrano entreduberto (1860, The Split Pomegranate) and Li Fiho d'Avignoun (1885, The Young Ladies of Avignon), two collections of lyric poems. He died in Avignon.French literatureby categoryFrench literary historyMedieval Renaissance 17th 18th 19th 20th century ContemporaryFrench writersChronological list Writers by category Essayists Novelists Playwrights Poets Short story writers Children's writersPortalsFrance French language Literature French/Francophone literaturev t eSee also[edit]Poetry portalProvençal literatureReferences[edit]Jean Albert Bédé and William Benbow Edgerton
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Château De Font-Ségugne
The Château
Château
de Font-Ségugne is a historic château built at Font-Ségugne in Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne, Provence, France. It is the location of a former bastide built in the fifteenth century for a Roman Catholic cardinal. It was the birthplace of the Félibrige
Félibrige
in the 1850s
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Joseph Roumanille
Joseph Roumanille
Joseph Roumanille
(Occitan: Josèp Romanilha, 8 August 1818 – 24 May 1891) was a Provençal poet. He was born at Saint-Rémy-de-Provence (Bouches-du-Rhône), and is commonly known in southern France
France
as the father of the Félibrige, for he first conceived the idea of raising his regional language to the dignity of a literary language.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit]Meeting of the Félibrige
Félibrige
in 1854: Frédéric Mistral, Joseph Roumanille, Théodore Aubanel, Jean Brunet, Paul Giéra, Anselme Mathieu, Alphonse Tavan Joseph Roumanille
Joseph Roumanille
was the son of Jean-Denis Roumanille and Pierrette Piquet. He studied at the nearby collège (junior highschool) of Tarascon
Tarascon
(Bouches-du-Rhône) from 1834
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Alphonse Tavan
Alphonse Tavan (1833–1905) was a French Provençal poet.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Death 4 Legacy 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Tavan was born in 1833 in Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne.[1] Career[edit] On 21 May 1854, he co-founded the Félibrige movement with Joseph Roumanille, Frédéric Mistral, Théodore Aubanel, Jean Brunet, Paul Giéra and Anselme Mathieu.[2] He published a collection of romantic poems in Provençal, Amour e plour, in 1876.[1] He attended the fiftieth anniversary of the Félibrige on 22 May 1904 with Mistral; all the other co-founders had died.[1]Bust in Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne.Death[edit] He died in 1905 in his hometown of Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne.[1] Legacy[edit] His bust adorns a fountain in Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne. The Collège Alphonse Tavan, a secondary school in Avignon, is named in his honour.[3] References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Alphonse Tavan.^ a b c d Alphonse Tavan (1833-1905), Biblio
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Jean Brunet
Jean Brunet
Jean Brunet
(27 December 1822 – 23 October 1894) was a French Provençal poet.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Death 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Brunet was born on 27 December 1822 in Avignon, in Provence, France.[1][2] Career[edit] On 21 May 1854, he co-founded the Félibrige
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Anselme Mathieu
Anselme Mathieu
Anselme Mathieu
(21 April 1828 – 8 February 1895) was a French Provençal poet.Contents1 Early life 2 Poetry 3 Wine 4 Death 5 Legacy 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Anselme Mathieu
Anselme Mathieu
was born 21 April 1828 in Châteauneuf-du-Pape.[1][
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Félibrige
The Félibrige
Félibrige
(French pronunciation: ​[felibʁiʒ]; Lo Felibritge in classical Occitan, Lou Felibrige in Mistralian spelling, pronounced [lu feliˈβɾidʒe]) is a literary and cultural association founded by Frédéric Mistral
Frédéric Mistral
and other Provençal writers to defend and promote the Provençal language (also called the Occitan language or langue d’oc) and literature
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