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Paul E. Patton
Paul Edward Patton (born May 26, 1937) is an American politician who was the 59th governor of Kentucky, serving from 1995 to 2003. Because of a 1992 amendment to the Kentucky
Kentucky
Constitution, he was the first governor eligible to succeed himself in office since James Garrard
James Garrard
in 1800. Since 2013, he has been the chancellor of the University of Pikeville in Pikeville, Kentucky
Kentucky
after serving as its president from 2010 to 2013. He also served as chairman of the Kentucky
Kentucky
Council on Postsecondary Education from 2009 to 2011. After graduating from the University of Kentucky
Kentucky
in 1959, Patton became wealthy operating coal mines for 20 years. He sold most of his coal interests in the late 1970s and entered politics, serving briefly in the cabinet of Governor John Y. Brown, Jr.
John Y

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Severance Tax
Severance taxes are taxes imposed on the removal of natural resources within a taxing jurisdiction. Severance taxes are most commonly imposed in oil producing states within the United States. Resources that typically incur severance taxes when extracted include oil, natural gas, coal, uranium, and timber. Some jurisdictions use other terms like gross production tax. Note that severance taxes are used in jurisdictions where most resource extraction occurs on privately owned land and/or where sub-surface minerals are privately owned (for example, the United States).[1][2] Where the resources are publicly owned to begin with (for example, in most Commonwealth and European Union
European Union
countries), it is not a tax but rather a resource royalty that is paid
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Grade Point Average
Grading in education is the process of applying standardized measurements of varying levels of achievement in a course. Grades can be assigned as letters (generally A through F), as a range (for example 1 to 6), as a percentage of a total number of questions answered correctly, or as a number out of a possible total (for example out of 20 or 100).[1] In some countries, all grades from all current classes are averaged to create a grade point average (GPA) for the marking period. The GPA is calculated by taking the number of grade points a student earned in a given period of time of middle school through high school.[2] GPAs are also calculated for undergraduate and graduate students in most universities. The GPA can be used by potential employers or educational institutions to assess and compare applicants. A cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is a calculation of the average of all of a student's total earned points divided by the possible number of points
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Kentucky Senate
Majority  Republican (27)Minority  Democratic (11)Length of term4 yearsAuthority The Legislative Department, Section 29, Kentucky
Kentucky
ConstitutionSalary $186.73/day + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (19 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (19 seats)Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Senate Chamber Kentucky
Kentucky
State Capitol Frankfort, KentuckyWebsite Kentucky
Kentucky
Legislative Research CommissionThe Kentucky
Kentucky
Senate is the upper house of the Kentucky
Kentucky
General Assembly. The Kentucky
Kentucky
Senate is composed of 38 members elected from single-member districts throughout the Commonwealth. There are no term limits for Kentucky
Kentucky
Senators
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1990s United States Boom
The 1990s economic boom in the United States was an extended period of economic prosperity, during which GDP increased continuously for almost ten years (the longest recorded expansion in the history of the United States). It commenced after the end of the early 1990s recession in March 1991, and ended in March 2001 with the start of the early 2000s recession, following the bursting of the dot com bubble.Contents1 End of the boom 2 Legacy 3 See also3.1 Contemporary economics 3.2 Contemporary booms4 ReferencesEnd of the boom[edit] Despite the concerns, it was during this time that talk of a "New Economy" emerged, where inflation and unemployment were low and strong growth coincided. Some even spoke of the end of the business cycle, where economic growth was perpetual. In April 2000, unemployment dropped to 3.8%, and was below 4% September–December 2000. For the whole 1990-2000 period, roughly 23,672,000 jobs were created
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Early 2000s Recession
The early 2000s recession was a decline in economic activity which mainly occurred in developed countries. The recession affected the European Union
European Union
during 2000 and 2001 and the United States
United States
in 2002 and 2003. The UK, Canada
Canada
and Australia
Australia
avoided the recession, while Russia, a nation that did not experience prosperity during the 1990s, in fact began to recover from said situation.[citation needed] Japan's 1990s recession continued. This recession was predicted by economists, because the boom of the 1990s (accompanied by both low inflation and low unemployment) slowed in some parts of East Asia
East Asia
during the 1997 Asian financial crisis. The recession in industrialized countries wasn't as significant as either of the two previous worldwide recessions
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Campaign Finance In The United States
Campaign finance
Campaign finance
in the United States is the financing of electoral campaigns at the federal, state, and local levels. At the federal level, campaign finance law is enacted by Congress and enforced by the Federal Election Commission
Federal Election Commission
(FEC), an independent federal agency. Although most campaign spending is privately financed, public financing is available for qualifying candidates for President of the United States during both the primaries and the general election. Eligibility requirements must be fulfilled to qualify for a government subsidy, and those that do accept government funding are usually subject to spending limits on money. Races for non-federal offices are governed by state and local law. Over half the states allow some level of corporate and union contributions
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Silo
A silo (from the Greek σιρός – siros, "pit for holding grain") is a structure for storing bulk materials. Silos are used in agriculture to store grain (see grain elevators) or fermented feed known as silage. Silos are more commonly used for bulk storage of grain, coal, cement, carbon black, woodchips, food products and sawdust
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4-H
4-H
4-H
is a global network of youth organizations whose mission is "engaging youth to reach their fullest potential while advancing the field of youth development".[1] Its name is a reference to the occurrence of the initial letter H four times in the organization's original motto ‘head, heart, hands, and health’ which was later incorporated into the fuller pledge officially adopted in 1927. In the United States, the organization is administered by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture of the United States
United States
Department of Agriculture (USDA). 4-H
4-H
Canada
Canada
is an independent non-profit organization overseeing the operation of branches throughout Canada.[2] Throughout the world, 4-H
4-H
organizations exist in over 50 countries;[3] the organization and administration varies from country to country
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Louisa, Kentucky
Louisa is a home rule-class city[2] located at the merger of the Levisa and Tug Forks into the Big Sandy River. It is located in Lawrence County, Kentucky, in the United States and is the seat of its county.[3] The population was 2,467 at the 2010 census.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Point of interest 4 Culture 5 Demographics 6 Education6.1 Secondary schools 6.2 Primary schools7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The origin of the city's name is unclear. Theories include that it was named for Louisa County, Virginia, or a corruption of the name of the Levisa or that it was named after Louisa Swetnam, one of the first white children born in the area. The Levisa Fork was originally written and spoken as the "Louisa Fork" which is the likely origin of the name. It is also possible that the town name was connected to the Spanish Era in Kentucky. Spain made land grants in what is now Kentucky. Explorer Dr. Thomas Walker named the river after a family member
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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Twelfth Grade
Twelfth grade, senior year, or grade 12 is the final year of secondary school in North America. In other regions it is also equivalently referred as class 12 or Year 13. In most countries students then graduate at age 17–18. Some countries have a thirteenth grade, while other countries do not have a 12th grade/year at all. Twelfth grade
Twelfth grade
is typically the last year of high school; graduation year.Contents1 Australia 2 Belgium 3 Brazil 4 Bulgaria 5 Canada 6 Denmark 7 Finland 8 France 9 Germany 10 Hong Kong 11 India 12 Ireland 13 Israel 14 Italy 15 Lebanon 16 Malaysia 17 Mexico 18 New Zealand 19 The Netherlands 20 Norway 21 Pakistan 22 Philippines 23 Portugal 24 Scotland 25 South Africa 26 Sweden 27 Turkey 28 United Kingdom 29 United States29.1 Traditions associated with senior year30 Latin America 31 References 32 See alsoAustralia[edit] In Australia, the twelfth grade is referred to as Year 12
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Kappa Sigma
International  United States  CanadaMotto Bononia Docet ("Bologna Teaches")[1] A.E.K.Δ.B.[2]Pledge pinColors      Scarlet      White      Emerald greenSymbol Star and CrescentFlagFlowerLily of the ValleyPublication The CaduceusPhilanthropy A Greater Cause; Military Heroes CampaignChapters 318Members 20,000[3] collegiate 282,000 lifetimeHeadquarters 1610 Scottsville Road Charlottesville, VA 22902 United StatesWebsite kappasigma.org Kappa Sigma
Kappa Sigma
(ΚΣ), commonly nicknamed Kappa Sig or K-Sig, is an American collegiate social fraternity founded at the University of Virginia
Virginia
in 1869
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Community College
A community college is a type of educational institution. The term can have different meanings in different countries, but usually refers to an educational institution that provides workforce education and college transfer academic programs. Some institutions maintain athletic teams and dormitories similar to their four-year counterparts.Contents1 Australia 2 Canada 3 India 4 Malaysia 5 Philippines 6 United Kingdom 7 United States 8 Research 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksAustralia[edit] In Australia, the term "community college" refers to small private businesses running short (e.g. 6 weeks) courses generally of a self-improvement or hobbyist nature. Equivalent to the American notion of community colleges are Tertiary And Further Education colleges or TAFEs; these are institutions mostly regulated at state and territory level
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Student Government Association
A students' union, student government, free student union, student senate, students' association, guild of students, or government of student body is a student organization present in many colleges, universities, and high schools. In higher education, the students' union is often accorded its own building on the campus, dedicated to social, organizational activities, representation, and academic support of the membership. In the United States, student union often only refers to a physical building owned by the university with the purpose of providing services for students without a governing body. This building is also referred to as a student activity center, although the Association of College Unions International (largely US-based) has hundreds of campus organizational members
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Floyd County, Kentucky
Floyd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 39,451.[1] Its county seat is Prestonsburg.[2] The county, founded in 1800, is named for Colonel John Floyd (1750–1783).[3][4]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Adjacent counties3 Demographics 4 Education 5 Economy5.1 Coal companies in Floyd County6 Politics 7 Communities7.1 Cities 7.2 Census-designated places 7.3 Other unincorporated places8 See also 9 Notable natives 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] On December 13, 1799, the Kentucky General Assembly passed legislation to form Floyd County as the 40th county of Kentucky.[5] The county was made from parts of Fleming, Montgomery, and Mason County, Kentucky. The legislation became effective on June 1, 1800.[5] The county was named for James John Floyd, a pioneer surveyor who helped lay out the city of Louisville. The county seat was Preston's Station, later renamed Prestonsburg
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