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Paul-philippe Hohenzollern
Paul-Philippe Hohenzollern
Paul-Philippe Hohenzollern
(born 13 August 1948), also known as Prince Paul of Romania and Paul Lambrino,[1] is the son of Carol Lambrino
Carol Lambrino
and Hélène Nagavitzine. His father was the elder son of King Carol II of Romania and Zizi Lambrino. Paul-Philippe claims that he and not Princess Margareta is the rightful head of the royal house of Romania.Contents1 Family and education 2 Claim 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksFamily and education[edit] In 1918, the crown prince of Romania (the future King Carol II) married Zizi Lambrino. The wedding was annulled the following year because it contravened the royal house's statute—Lambrino was both a Romanian and a commoner, and the marriage took place without the consent of the king. The couple had one son, Carol Lambrino, the father of Paul Hohenzollern
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House Of Romania
HRH The Crown Princess HRH Prince Radu* HRH Princess Elena HRH Princess Sophie HRH Princess MariaHRH Prince Paul‡ HRH Princess Lia‡HRH Prince Carol Ferdinand‡HRH Prince Alexander‡*Titled according to private family rules ‡Status disputedv t eThe Kingdom of Romania
Romania
(Romanian: Regatul României) was a constitutional monarchy in Southeastern Europe, ruled by a royal family that was a branch of the Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
dynasty. The Kingdom existed from 1881, when prince Carol I of Romania
Carol I of Romania
was proclaimed King, until 1947, when the last king, Michael I of Romania, abdicated and the Parliament proclaimed Romania
Romania
a republic
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Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
Hohenzollern- Sigmaringen
Sigmaringen
was a small county in southwestern Germany. Its rulers belonged to the senior Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern
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Peleș Castle
Peleș Castle
Castle
(Romanian: Castelul Peleș pronounced [kasˈtelul ˈpeleʃ] ( listen)) is a Neo-Renaissance
Neo-Renaissance
castle in the Carpathian Mountains, near Sinaia, in Prahova County, Romania, on an existing medieval route linking Transylvania
Transylvania
and Wallachia, built between 1873 and 1914. Its inauguration was held in 1883. It was constructed for King Carol I.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Description 4 Museum 5 Present day 6 See also 7 ReferencesLocation[edit] The complex is northwest of the town of Sinaia, which is 48 kilometres (30 mi) from Braşov
Braşov
and 124 kilometres (77 mi) from Bucharest
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Romanian Presidential Election, 2000
Emil Constantinescu CDRElected President Ion Iliescu PDSRGeneral elections were held in Romania
Romania
on 26 November 2000, with a second round of the presidential election on 10 December.[1] Former president Ion Iliescu
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History Of The Jews In Romania
The history of the Jews
Jews
in Romania
Romania
concerns the Jews
Jews
both of Romania and of Romanian origins, from their first mention on what is present-day Romanian territory. Minimal until the 18th century, the size of the Jewish population increased after around 1850, and more especially after the establishment of Greater Romania
Romania
in the aftermath of World War I. A diverse community, albeit an overwhelmingly urban one, Jews
Jews
were a target of religious persecution and racism in Romanian society – from the late-19th century debate over the "Jewish Question" and the Jewish residents' right to citizenship, to the genocide carried out in the lands of Romania
Romania
as part of the Holocaust
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Capital Punishment In Romania
Capital punishment
Capital punishment
in Romania
Romania
was abolished in 1990, and has been prohibited by the Constitution of Romania
Constitution of Romania
since 1991.Contents1 Antecedents 2 Kingdom of Romania 3 Communist Romania 4 Romania
Romania
since 1989 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesAntecedents[edit] The death penalty has a long and varied history in present-day Romania. Vlad the Impaler
Vlad the Impaler
(reigned in Wallachia, principally 1456–62) was notorious for executing thousands by impalement.[1] One of his successors, Constantine Hangerli, was strangled, shot, stabbed and beheaded by the Ottomans in 1799.[2] In Moldavia, the earliest reference to executions is found in a 1646 text from the time of Vasile Lupu, while in Wallachia, a similar mention from 1652 dates to Matei Basarab's reign
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The Jerusalem Post
The Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Post is a broadsheet newspaper based in Jerusalem, founded in 1932 during the British Mandate of Palestine
British Mandate of Palestine
by Gershon Agron as The Palestine Post. In 1950, it changed its name to The Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Post. In 2004, the paper was bought by Mirkaei Tikshoret, a diversified Israeli media firm controlled by investor Eli Azur. In April 2014, Azur acquired the newspaper Maariv.[4] The newspaper is published in English and French editions. Formerly regarded as left-wing, the paper underwent a noticeable shift to the right in the late 1980s.[5] From 2004, under then editor-in-chief David Horovitz, the paper took a more centrist position, competing against the staunchly left-liberal Ha'aretz
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Jean Ancel
Jean Ancel (1940 – 30 April 2008) was a Romanian-born Israeli author and historian; with specialty in the history of the Jews in Romania between the two World wars, and the Holocaust of the Jews of Romania. Biography[edit] Jean Ancel was born Jewish parents in Iași, Romania. He was a year old during the Iași pogrom, and was hidden in the basement during that time. His father was taken to one of the Holocaust trains, but eventually survived. Later, he studied history at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, but was expelled before graduating because he had registered for an aliyah to Israel. He continued his studies after moving to the newly formed Jewish state in 1959 at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he graduated BA in History and Romance languages in 1967. In 1970, he earned another degree, this time on Jewish history. He then got his two degrees, one in History in 1972 and the second in archiving in 1974
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Line Of Succession To The Former Romanian Throne
The succession order to the throne of the Romanian monarchy, abolished since 1947, was regulated by the monarchical constitution of 1923 and the 1884 Law of the Romanian Royal House Rules enacted pursuant to the 1866 Constitution of Romania which had confirmed the enthronement of Prince Karl (Carol) of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. The defunct 1923 Constitution stipulated Salic law, according to which the throne was hereditary in King Carol I's legitimate descent and, if his male issue failed, in the descent of his brothers of the Sigmaringen princely branch of the House of Hohenzollern, according to agnatic primogeniture and to the perpetual exclusion of females and their descendants. The last monarch to reign in Romania was King Michael I, who was born in 1921, abdicated his throne on 30 December 1947 under coercion,[1][2][3] and went into exile in Switzerland
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High Court Of Cassation And Justice
The High Court of Cassation and Justice
High Court of Cassation and Justice
(Romanian: Înalta Curte de Casație și Justiție) is Romania's supreme court, and the court of last resort. It is the equivalent of France's Cour de cassation and serves a similar function to other courts of cassation around the world. It held various names during its existence: "Curtea Supremă" (Supreme Court) and "Tribunalul Suprem" (Supreme Tribunal) during Communist times (1948–1952 and 1952–1989 respectively), and "Curtea Supremă de Justiție" (Supreme Court of Justice) from 1990 to 2003
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Andrei Oişteanu
Andrei Oişteanu (Romanian pronunciation: [anˈdrej o.iʃˈte̯anu]; born September 18, 1948) is a Romanian historian of religions and mentalities, ethnologist, cultural anthropologist, literary critic and novelist. Specialized in the history of religions and mentalities, he is also noted for his investigation of rituals and magic and his work in Jewish studies and the history of antisemitism. After the Romanian Revolution of 1989, he also became noted for his articles and essays on the Holocaust in Romania. A founding member and researcher at the Institute for History of Religions in Bucharest (Romanian Academy), a member of the Romanian Academy's Folklore and Ethnology Commission and the International Union of Ethnological and Anthropological Sciences in London, he is the president of the Romanian Association for the History of Religions (RAHR)
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Romania TV
România TV is a 24-hour Romanian alternative news television, launched on 23 October 2011.[1] It was formed by the entrepreneur and fugitive Sebastian Ghiță when the new owner of Realitatea TV, Elan Schwartzenberg, moved the headquarters of the television at Willbrook Platinum, being joined by a group of people. It is a TV channel well known for fake news and implications in the political camp, favouring the side of its owner
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King Of The Romanians
The King of the Romanians
King of the Romanians
(Romanian: Regele Românilor)[1] or King of Romania
Romania
(Romanian: Regele României), was the title of the monarch of the Kingdom of Romania
Kingdom of Romania
from 1881 until 1947, when Romania
Romania
was proclaimed the Romanian People's Republic
Romanian People's Republic
following Michael I's forced abdication.Contents1 History 2 Return from exile 3 Kings of Romania
Romania
(1881–1947) 4 Queens consort of Romania4.1 Timeline5 Royal Standards 6 See also 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] See also: History of Romania The state had been internationally recognized as a principality since 1862, after the creation of the United Principalities, a personal union between Moldavia
Moldavia
and Wallachia, at that time vassal states of the Ottoman Empire
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Romanian Royal Family
HRH The Crown Princess HRH Prince Radu* HRH Princess Elena HRH Princess Sophie HRH Princess MariaHRH Prince Paul‡ HRH Princess Lia‡HRH Prince Carol Ferdinand‡HRH Prince Alexander‡*Titled according to private family rules ‡Status disputedv t eThe Kingdom of Romania (Romanian: Regatul României) was a constitutional monarchy in Southeastern Europe, ruled by a royal family that was a branch of the Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen dynasty. The Kingdom existed from 1881, when prince Carol I of Romania was proclaimed King, until 1947, when the last king, Michael I of Romania, abdicated and the Parliament proclaimed Romania a republic. Soon after, after the establishment of the constitution of 13 April 1948, Romania became a socialist republic, a regime that lasted until 1989. Members of the former royal family include the daughters of the late, former, King Michael of Romania. Some descendants have adopted the surname "of Romania"
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King Michael I Of Romania
Michael I (Romanian: Mihai I [miˈhaj]; 25 October 1921 – 5 December 2017) was the last King of Romania, reigning from 20 July 1927 to 8 June 1930 and again from 6 September 1940 until his abdication on 30 December 1947. Shortly after Michael's birth, his father Prince Carol had become involved in a controversial relationship with Magda Lupescu. In 1925, Carol was eventually pressured to renounce his rights to the throne and moved to Paris in exile with Lupescu. In 1927, Michael ascended the throne, following the death of his grandfather, Ferdinand I. As he was still a minor, a regency council was instituted which comprised his uncle, Prince Nicholas; the Patriarch Miron Cristea; and the president of the Supreme Court, Gheorghe Buzdugan. The council proved to be ineffective and in 1930, Carol returned to Romania and replaced his son as king, reigning as Carol II
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