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Patrick Dillon
The Rev. Patrick Dillon, C.S.C. (January 1, 1832 – November 15, 1868) was an Irish-American Catholic
Catholic
priest, and second President of the University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
from 1865 to 1866. He was the first Irish priest of the University. President of the University of Notre Dame[edit] The Rev. Patrick Dillon
Patrick Dillon
served as the second president of the University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
from 1865 to 1866. He succeeded Fr. Edward Sorin when Sorin decided to focus on his job as Provincial of the Congregation. His brief tenure featured the construction of the second main building.[1] Dillon instituted the Commercial Course, which offered students the opportunity to study bookkeeping and commercial law
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Patrick Joseph Dillon
Rev Patrick Edward Joseph Dillon (1841 – 11 June 1889)[1] was an Irish Catholic priest, missionary in Argentina, politician and founder of The Southern Cross newspaper. Biography[edit] Dillon was born in Tuam, County Galway, Ireland, in 1841, the eldest child of John Dillon and Julia Rigny. He was baptized on April 24, 1841. Dillon received his early education at school in Banagher, County Offaly and then entered the missionary seminary at All Hallows College, Dublin and was ordained priest on 25 October 1863. His education along with five other seminarians was funded by Fr Fahy the Chaplin of Buenos Aires. In 1866, Fr
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Congregation Of Holy Cross
The Congregation of Holy Cross
Congregation of Holy Cross
or Congregatio a Sancta Cruce (C.S.C.) is a Catholic congregation of priests and brothers founded in 1837 by Blessed Basil Moreau, in Le Mans, France. Father Moreau also founded the Marianites of Holy Cross, now divided into three independent congregations of sisters
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President Of The University Of Notre Dame
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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County Galway, Ireland
County Galway (Irish: Contae na Gaillimhe) is a county in Ireland. Lying in the middle of the West of Ireland, it is part of the province of Connacht (English spelling: Connaught) and is named after the city of Galway. There are several Irish-speaking areas in the west of the county. The traditional county includes, and is named for, Galway city, but the city and county have separate local authorities - a city council administers the urban area, while the rest of the county is administered by Galway County Council. The population of the county is 258,552 according to the 2016 census.[1]Contents1 History 2 Irish language 3 Local government and politics 4 Geography4.1 Lakes 4.2 Climate 4.3 Flora and fauna 4.4 Largest settlements in County Galway (2011 Census)5 Economy 6 Sports 7 Towns and villages 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]Dunguaire Castle, built c
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Notre Dame, Indiana
Notre Dame is a census-designated place[4] north of South Bend in St. Joseph County, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Indiana. It includes the campuses of three colleges: the University of Notre Dame, Saint Mary's College, and Holy Cross College. Notre Dame is split between Clay and Portage Townships. As of the 2010 census, its population was 5,973.[3]Contents1 Demographics 2 Holy Cross Religious Communities 3 Government and infrastructure 4 Education 5 ReferencesDemographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±U.S. Decennial Census[5]Holy Cross Religious Communities[edit]Campus of the University of Notre DameHoly Cross Village at Notre Dame is a retirement community offering continuing care in Notre Dame, Indiana
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Priest
A priest or priestess (feminine) (/priːst/ from Greek πρεσβύτερος presbýteros through Latin
Latin
presbyter, "elder", or from Old High German
Old High German
priast, prest, from Vulgar Latin
Latin
"provost" "one put over others", from Latin
Latin
praepositus "person placed in charge"), is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in particular, rites of sacrifice to, and propitiation of, a deity or deities
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The Reverend
The Reverend
The Reverend
is an honorific style[1] most often placed before the names of Christian clergy and ministers. There are sometimes differences in the way the style is used in different countries and church traditions. The Reverend
The Reverend
is correctly called a style but is often and in some dictionaries called a title, form of address or title of respect.[2] The style is also sometimes used by leaders in non-Christian religions such as Judaism
Judaism
and Buddhism. The term is an anglicisation of the Latin reverendus, the style originally used in Latin documents in medieval Europe. It is the gerundive or future passive participle of the verb revereri ("to respect; to revere"), meaning "[one who is] to be revered/must be respected". The Reverend
The Reverend
is therefore equivalent to The Honourable or The Venerable
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John Francis O'Hara
John Francis Noll Joseph Elmer RitterDate of consecration 15 January 1940CardinalateElevated by Pope John XXIIIDate of elevation 15 December 1958Episcopal successionBishops consecrated by John Francis O'Hara
John Francis O'Hara
as principal consecratorLawrence Leo Graner 1947Hubert James Cartwright 1956Francis Joseph McSorley 1958 John Francis O'Hara
John Francis O'Hara
CSC (August 1, 1888 – August 28, 1960) was an American member of the Congregation of Holy Cross
Congregation of Holy Cross
and prelate of the Catholic Church
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John I. Jenkins
John Ignatus Jenkins CSC (born December 17, 1953) is president of the University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
and an ordained Catholic priest for the Congregation of Holy Cross. He was elected as the president-elect by the Notre Dame Board of Trustees on April 30, 2004, and became the university’s 17th president as of July 1, 2005[update] He previously served as vice-president and associate provost.[1] He replaced Fr. Edward Malloy. On January 30, 2015 Jenkins was elected to his third five-year term as president.[2]Contents1 Career 2 Commitment and vision 3 Honors and awards 4 Interests 5 References 6 External linksCareer[edit] A Notre Dame alumnus, Jenkins earned bachelor's and master's degrees in philosophy from the University in 1976 and 1978, respectively, and was ordained a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross
Congregation of Holy Cross
in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on campus in 1983
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Edward Malloy
The Rev. Edward Aloysius Malloy, C.S.C. (born May 3, 1941), nicknamed "Monk", served from 1987 to 2005 as the 16th president of the University of Notre Dame.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Presidency of the University of Notre Dame 3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Edward Malloy was born on May 3, 1941 in Washington, D.C..[1] He attended Archbishop Carroll High School, where he was part of a basketball team that included John Thompson and Tom Hoover. During his senior season, the team started a 55-game winning streak.[3] He received a B.A. and an M.A. in English from the University of Notre Dame in 1963 and 1967, and an M.A
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Theodore Hesburgh
Rev. Theodore Martin Hesburgh, CSC (May 25, 1917 – February 26, 2015) was a native of Syracuse, New York, who became an ordained priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross
Congregation of Holy Cross
and is best known for his service as the president of the University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
for thirty-five years (1952–1987). In addition to his career as an educator and author, Hesburgh was a public servant and social activist involved in numerous American civic and governmental initiatives, commissions, and international humanitarian projects. Hesburgh received numerous honors and awards for his service, most notably the United States's Presidential Medal of Freedom
Presidential Medal of Freedom
(1964) and Congressional Gold Medal (2000)
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John J. Cavanaugh
The Rev. John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C. (Jan. 23, 1899 – Dec. 28, 1979), a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross, served from 1946 to 1952 as the 14th president of the University of Notre Dame, having previously served as its vice president since 1941.Contents1 Life before ordination 2 Ministry at Notre Dame 3 Informal Chaplain to the Joseph P. Kennedy
Joseph P. Kennedy
Family 4 Trivia 5 ReferencesLife before ordination[edit] Cavanaugh's family emigrated from the tri-County region of southwest County Wicklow, on the Cos. Carlow
Carlow
and Wexford
Wexford
border. They settled originally in Erinsville, Ontario
Erinsville, Ontario
and later trekked to the upper Middle West, settling in Owosso, MI. Cavanaugh was a first cousin to the Honorable John Franklin Kinney
John Franklin Kinney
of Rochester, New York
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