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Passion (1999 Film)
Passion, known in some releases as Passion: The Story of Percy Grainger, is a 1999 Australian drama film about some episodes in the life of the pianist and composer Percy Grainger
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Linda Cropper
Linda Cropper is an Australian actress, primarily in television and stage theatre Her credits include the lead role in Melba as well as roles in ABC mini-series Palace of Dreams, Edens Lost, Ring of Scorpio, Bordertown, Wildside, Water Rats, All Saints, White Collar Blue and The Pacific, and more recently she has starred in Offspring. She is possibly best known to international audiences for her recurring role as Xhalax Sun
Xhalax Sun
during the third season of the science fiction series Farscape. Linda Cropper has a string of film credits to her name. She starred alongside Kate Hudson
Kate Hudson
on Fool's Gold, as well as the award-winning Little Fish with Cate Blanchett, Teesh and Trude and Envy.[1] Theatre[edit] Cropper appeared in Simon Phillip’s co-production of Poor Boy for the Melbourne Theatre Company
Melbourne Theatre Company
and Sydney Theatre Company
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Homosexuality
Homosexuality
Homosexuality
is romantic attraction, sexual attraction or sexual behavior between members of the same sex or gender. As a sexual orientation, homosexuality is "an enduring pattern of emotional, romantic, and/or sexual attractions" to people of the same sex
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Film Critics Circle Of Australia
The Film
Film
Critics Circle of Australia
Australia
is a group of cinema critics that judge Australian films. In an annual event, the Circle distributes its awards for best film performances during the year
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Australian Film Institute Awards
The Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts
Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts
Awards, known as the AACTA Awards, are presented annually by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). The awards recognise excellence of professionals in the film and television industry, including the producers, directors, actors, writers, and cinematographers. It is the most prestigious awards ceremony for the Australian film and television industry. They are generally considered to be the Australian counterpart of the Academy Awards
Academy Awards
(U.S.) and British Academy Awards. The awards, previously called Australian Film Institute Awards or AFI Awards, began in 1958 and involved 30 nominations across six categories
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Australian Cinematographers Society
The Australian Cinematographers Society
Australian Cinematographers Society
(ACS) is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 1958 for the purpose of providing a forum for Australian Cinematographers to further develop their skills through mutual co-operation.Contents1 Location 2 Mission 3 People 4 Awards 5 Legacy 6 Books and publications 7 References 8 External linksLocation[edit] Its National Headquarters and clubhouse is located in North Sydney.[1] Mission[edit] The ACS states the following aims:To keep members informed about the latest techn
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Canberra
Canberra
Canberra
(/ˈkænbrə/ ( listen), /-bərə/)[9] is the capital city of Australia. With a population of 403,468,[1] it is Australia's largest inland city and the eighth-largest city overall. The city is located at the northern end of the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), 280 km (170 mi) south-west of Sydney, and 660 km (410 mi) north-east of Melbourne. A resident of Canberra
Canberra
is known as a "Canberran". Although Canberra
Canberra
is the capital and seat of government, many federal government ministries have secondary seats in state capital cities, as do the Governor-General and the Prime Minister. The site of Canberra
Canberra
was selected for the location of the nation's capital in 1908 as a compromise between rivals Sydney
Sydney
and Melbourne, Australia's two largest cities
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Devon
Devon
Devon
(/ˈdɛvən/), also known as Devonshire, which was formerly its common and official name, is a county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
in the north to the English Channel
English Channel
in the south. It is part of South West England, bounded by Cornwall
Cornwall
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the northeast, and Dorset
Dorset
to the east
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Bath, Somerset
Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859.[2] Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London
London
and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1987. The city became a spa with the Latin
Latin
name Aquae Sulis
Aquae Sulis
("the waters of Sulis") c.60  AD  when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although hot springs were known even before then. Bath Abbey
Bath Abbey
was founded in the 7th century and became a religious centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. In the 17th century, claims were made for the curative properties of water from the springs, and Bath became popular as a spa town in the Georgian era
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Ada Crossley
Ada Jemima Crossley (3 March 1874 – 17 October 1929) was an Australian singer. Born at Tarraville, Gippsland, Victoria, she was the daughter of Edward Wallis Crossley, an ironmonger, and Harriette, née Morris, both from Northamptonshire, England. Ada was the sixth surviving child in a family of twelve children. Crossley's singing in the country met with so much appreciation that she was sent to Melbourne
Melbourne
to be trained, where Sir Frederic Cowen, (who had come from London
London
to conduct the orchestra at the Melbourne International Exhibition of 1888–9), heard her sing and gave her advice. She studied under Madame Fanny Simonsen for singing, and under Alberto Zelman the elder for piano and harmony.[1] Her first appearance was with the Philharmonic Society at Melbourne
Melbourne
in 1889
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John Harry Grainger
John Harry Grainger
John Harry Grainger
(30 November 1854[1] - 15 April 1917[2]) was an English-born architect and civil engineer who emigrated to Australia in 1877, and the father of musician Percy Grainger. He designed 14 bridges, including the Princes Bridge
Princes Bridge
in Melbourne.Contents1 Family background 2 Early career 3 Career in Australia3.1 Eastern states 3.2 Western Australia4 Bridge designs 5 ReferencesFamily background[edit] Grainger was born at 1 New Street, Westminster, Central London, into a Northumbrian family of builders, architects and engineers. His parents were John Grainger, a master tailor, and Mary Ann Grainger, née Parsons. He grew up in Durham
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Cinema Of Australia
The Australian film industry has its beginnings with the 1906 production of The Story of the Kelly Gang, the earliest feature film ever made. Since then, many films have been produced in Australia, a number of which have received international recognition. Many actors and filmmakers started their careers in Australian films, a large number of whom have acquired international reputations, and a number of whom have found greater financial benefits in careers in larger film producing centres, such as in the United States. The first public screenings of films in Australia
Australia
were in October 1896, within a year of the world's first screening in Paris by Lumière brothers. The first Australian exhibition took place at the Athenaeum Hall in Collins Street, Melbourne, to provide alternative entertainment for the dance hall patrons
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Incest
Incest
Incest
is sexual activity between family members or close relatives.[1][2] This typically includes sexual activity between people in a consanguineous relationship (blood relations), and sometimes those related by affinity, stepfamily, those related by adoption or marriage, or members of the same clan or lineage. The incest taboo is and has been one of the most widespread of all cultural taboos, both in present and in many past societies.[3] Most modern societies have laws regarding incest or social restrictions on closely consanguineous marriages.[3] In societies w
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Flagellation
Flagellation
Flagellation
(Latin flagellum, "whip"), flogging, whipping or lashing is the act of beating the human body with special implements such as whips, lashes, rods, switches, the cat o' nine tails, the sjambok, etc. Typically, flogging is imposed on an unwilling subject as a punishment; however, it can also be submitted to willingly, or performed on oneself, in religious or sadomasochistic contexts. The strokes are usually aimed at the unclothed back of a person, in certain settings it can be extended to other corporeal areas
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