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Partition Of Ireland
The partition of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: críochdheighilt na hÉireann) was the division of the island of Ireland
Ireland
into two distinct jurisdictions, Northern Ireland
Ireland
and Southern Ireland. It took place on 3 May 1921 under the Government of Ireland
Ireland
Act 1920. Today the former is still known as Northern Ireland
Ireland
and forms part of the United Kingdom, while the latter is now a sovereign state also named Ireland
Ireland
and sometimes called the Republic
Republic
of Ireland. The Act of 1920 was intended to create two self-governing territories within Ireland, with both remaining within the United Kingdom. It also contained provisions for co-operation between the two territories and for the eventual reunification of Ireland
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Irish Language
The Irish language
Irish language
(Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language,[5] is a Goidelic
Goidelic
language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland
Ireland
and historically spoken by the Irish people. Irish is spoken as a first language by a small minority of Irish people, and as a second language by a larger group of non-native speakers. Irish has been the predominant language of the Irish people
Irish people
for most of their recorded history, and they have brought it with them to other regions, notably Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man, where Middle Irish gave rise to Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Manx respectively
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Irish Question
The Irish Question was a phrase used mainly by members of the British ruling classes from the early 19th century until the 1920s
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Ulster Volunteers
The Ulster
Ulster
Volunteers was a unionist militia founded in 1912 to block domestic self-government (or Home Rule) for Ireland, which was then part of the United Kingdom. The Ulster
Ulster
Volunteers were based in the northern province of Ulster. Many Ulster
Ulster
Protestants
Protestants
feared being governed by a Catholic-majority parliament in Dublin
Dublin
and losing their local supremacy and strong links with Britain. In 1913, the militias were organised into the Ulster
Ulster
Volunteer Force (UVF) and vowed to resist any attempts by the British Government to 'impose' Home Rule on Ulster. Later that year, Irish nationalists formed a rival militia, the Irish Volunteers, to safeguard Home Rule. In April 1914, the UVF smuggled 25,000 rifles into Ulster
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German Empire
The German Empire
German Empire
(German: Deutsches Kaiserreich, officially Deutsches Reich),[5][6][7][8] also known as Imperial Germany,[9] was the German nation state[10] that existed from the Unification of Germany
Unification of Germany
in 1871 until the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm II
Wilhelm II
in 1918. It was founded in 1871 when the south German states joined the North German Confederation. On January 1st, the new constitution came into force that changed the name of the federal state and introduced the title of emperor for Wilhelm I, King of Prussia
King of Prussia
from the Hohenzollern dynasty.[11] Berlin
Berlin
remained its capital. Otto von Bismarck
Otto von Bismarck
remained Chancellor, the head of government
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Buckingham Palace Conference
The Buckingham Palace Conference, sometimes referred to as the Buckingham Palace Conference on Ireland, was a conference called in Buckingham Palace in 1914 by King George V to which the leaders of Irish Nationalism and Irish Unionism were invited to discuss plans to introduce Home Rule to Ireland and avert a feared civil war on the issue. The King's initiative brought the leaders of Nationalism and Unionism together for the first time in a conference.Contents1 Background 2 The Conference 3 Long-term impact 4 Later interventions by George V on Ireland 5 References5.1 Sources 5.2 CitationsBackground[edit] Since the 1870s, a concerted campaign had been made by Irish nationalist leaders at Westminster, in particular by Charles Stewart Parnell, to have Home Rule (regional self-government) introduced into Ireland. This demand, however, was opposed by the leaders of Irish Unionism, who feared being placed under a Catholic-Nationalist dominated Irish parliament in Dublin
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Royal Assent
Royal assent
Royal assent
or sanction is the method by which a country's monarch (possibly through a delegated official) formally approves an act of that nation's parliament. In certain nations, such assent makes the act law (promulgation) while in other nations assent is distinct from promulgation. In the vast majority of contemporary monarchies, this act is considered to be little more than a formality; even in those nations which still permit their monarchs to withhold royal assent (such as the United Kingdom, Norway, and Liechtenstein), the monarch almost never does so, save in a dire political emergency or upon the advice of their government. While the power to withhold royal assent was once exercised often in European monarchies, it is exceedingly rare in the modern, democratic political atmosphere that has developed there since the 18th century. Royal assent
Royal assent
is sometimes associated with elaborate ceremonies
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Suspensory Act 1914
The Suspensory Act 1914
Suspensory Act 1914
(4 & 5 Geo. 5 c. 88) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
which suspended the coming into force of two other Acts: the Welsh Church Act 1914
Welsh Church Act 1914
(for the disestablishment of the Church of England
Church of England
in Wales), and the Government of Ireland
Ireland
Act 1914 (Third Home Rule Bill for Ireland). The Suspensory Act received the royal assent on the same day as the two Acts it suspended, on 18 September 1914. Background[edit] Welsh disestablishment and Irish home rule were both major policies of H. H. Asquith's Liberal government that had met with considerable controversy and parliamentary opposition in the 1910s
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Irish Republicanism
Irish republicanism
Irish republicanism
(Irish: poblachtánachas Éireannach) is an ideology based on the belief that all of Ireland
Ireland
should be an independent republic. The development of nationalist and democratic sentiment throughout Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was reflected in Ireland
Ireland
in the emergence of republicanism, in opposition to British rule
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Joseph Chamberlain
Joseph Chamberlain
Joseph Chamberlain
(8 July 1836 – 2 July 1914) was a British statesman who was first a radical Liberal, then, after opposing home rule for Ireland, a Liberal Unionist, and eventually served as a leading imperialist in coalition with the Conservatives. He split both major British parties in the course of his career. Chamberlain made his career in Birmingham, first as a manufacturer of screws and then as a notable mayor of the city. He was a radical Liberal Party member and an opponent of the Elementary Education Act 1870. As a self-made businessman, he had never attended university and had contempt for the aristocracy. He entered the House of Commons at 39 years of age, relatively late in life compared to politicians from more privileged backgrounds. Rising to power through his influence with the Liberal grassroots organisation, he served as President of the Board of Trade in Gladstone's Second Government (1880–85)
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Soloheadbeg Ambush
The Soloheadbeg
Soloheadbeg
ambush took place on 21 January 1919, when members of the Irish Volunteers
Irish Volunteers
(or Irish Republican Army, IRA) ambushed Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) officers who were escorting a consignment of gelignite explosives at Soloheadbeg, County Tipperary
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United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Ireland
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland
Ireland
was a sovereign country in western Europe, the predecessor to the modern United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland. It was established on 1 January 1801 by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. Britain financed the European coalition that defeated France in 1815 in the Napoleonic Wars. Britain, with its unsurpassed Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and British Empire, became the foremost world power for the next century. The Crimean War
Crimean War
with Russia and the Boer wars were relatively small operations in a largely peaceful century.[1] Rapid industrialisation that began in the decades prior to the state's formation continued up until the mid-19th century
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Devolution In The United Kingdom
In the United Kingdom, devolution (Scottish Gaelic: fèin-riaghlaidh, Welsh: datganoli; Irish: Dílárú) refers to the statutory granting of powers from the Parliament
Parliament
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
to the Scottish Parliament, the National Assembly for Wales, the Northern Ireland Assembly and the London Assembly
London Assembly
and to their associated executive bodies the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government, the Northern Ireland Executive and in England, the Greater London Authority
Greater London Authority
and combined authorities. Devolution
Devolution
differs from federalism in that the devolved powers of the subnational authority ultimately reside in central government, thus the state remains, de jure, a unitary state
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Irish Free State (Agreement) Act 1922
The Irish Free State
Irish Free State
(Agreement) Act 1922 (12 & 13 Geo. 5 c. 4) was an Act of the British Parliament
British Parliament
passed on 31 March 1922
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