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Part 15
Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Part 15 (47 CFR 15) is an oft-quoted part of Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) rules and regulations regarding unlicensed transmissions. It is a part of Title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations
Code of Federal Regulations
(CFR), and regulates everything from spurious emissions to unlicensed low-power broadcasting
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Code Of Federal Regulations
The Code of Federal Regulations
Code of Federal Regulations
(CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules and regulations (sometimes called administrative law) published in the Federal Register
Federal Register
by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government of the United States
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Campus
A campus is traditionally the land on which a college or university and related institutional buildings are situated. Usually a college campus includes libraries, lecture halls, residence halls, student centers or dining halls, and park-like settings. A modern campus is a collection of buildings and grounds that belong to a given institution, either academic or non-academic
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Voltage
Voltage, electric potential difference, electric pressure or electric tension (formally denoted ∆V or ∆U, but more often simply as V or U, for instance in the context of Ohm's or Kirchhoff's circuit laws) is the difference in electric potential between two points. The voltage between two points is equal to the work done per unit of charge against a static electric field to move a test charge between two points
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Mains Power
Mains electricity
Mains electricity
is the general-purpose alternating-current (AC) electric power supply. It is the form of electrical power that is delivered to homes and businesses, and it is the form of electrical power that consumers use when they plug kitchen appliances, televisions and electric lamps into wall sockets. The two principal properties of the electric power supply, voltage and frequency, differ between regions. A voltage of (nominally) 230 V and a frequency of 50 Hz is used in Europe, most of Africa, most of Asia, much of South America
South America
and Australia. In North America, the most common combination is 120 V and a frequency of 60 Hz. Other voltages exist, and some countries may have, for example, 230 V but 60 Hz. This is a concern to travellers, since portable appliances designed for one voltage and frequency combination may not operate with, or may even be destroyed by another
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TV-band Device
TV band devices or TVBDs are new unlicensed radio frequency devices operating in the vacant channels or white spaces between US television channels in the range of 54 to 698 MHz. The rules defining these devices were announced on November 4, 2008, and published by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in a Second Report and Order on November 14, 2008. The rules were finalized in a Second Memorandum Opinion and Order on September 23, 2010
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Television Channel
A television channel is a broadcast frequency or virtual number over which a television station or television network is distributed. For example, in North America, "channel 2" refers to the broadcast or cable band of 54 to 60 MHz, with carrier frequencies of 55.25 MHz for NTSC
NTSC
analog video (VSB) and 59.75  MHz
MHz
for analog audio (FM), or 55.31  MHz
MHz
for digital ATSC
ATSC
(8VSB). Channels may be shared by many different television stations or cable-distributed channels depending on the location and service provider Depending on the multinational bandplan for a given regional n, analog television channels are typically 6, 7, or 8  MHz
MHz
in bandwidth, and therefore television channel frequencies vary as well. Channel numbering is also different
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North American Broadcast Television Frequencies
North American television frequencies are different for over-the-air (also called terrestrial) and cable television systems. Over-the-air television channels are divided into two bands: the VHF band which comprises channels 2 through 13 and occupies frequencies between 54 and 216 MHz, and the UHF band, which comprises channels 14 through 83 and occupies frequencies between 470 and 890 MHz. These bands are different enough in frequency that they often require separate antennas to receive (although many antennas cover both VHF and UHF), and separate tuning controls on the television set. The VHF band is further divided into two frequency ranges: VHF low band (Band I) between 54 and 88 MHz, containing channels 2 through 6, and VHF high band (Band III) between 174 and 216 MHz, containing channels 7 through 13. The wide spacing between these frequency bands is responsible for the complicated design of rooftop TV antennas
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Personal Computer
A personal computer (PC) is a multi-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and price make it feasible for individual use. PCs are intended to be operated directly by an end user, rather than by a computer expert or technician. Computer
Computer
time-sharing models that were typically used with larger, more expensive minicomputer and mainframe systems, to enable them be used by many people at the same time, are not used with PCs. Early computer owners in the 1960s, invariably institutional or corporate, had to write their own programs to do any useful work with the machines
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Peripheral Device
A peripheral device is "an ancillary device used to put information into and get information out of the computer."[1] Three categories of peripheral devices exist based on their relationship with the computer:an input device sends data or instructions to the computer, such as a mouse, keyboard, graphics tablet, image scanner, barcode reader, game controller, light pen, light gun, microphone, digital camera, webcam, dance pad, and read-only memory); an output device provides output from the computer, such as a computer monitor, projector, printer, and computer speaker); and an input/output device performs both input and output functions, such as a computer data storage device (including a disk drive, USB flash drive, memory card, and tape drive) and a touchscreen).Many modern electronic devices, such as digital watches, smartphones, and tablet computers, have interfaces that allow them to be used as computer peripheral devices. See also[edit]Look up peripheral in Wi
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Electrical Ballast
An electrical ballast is a device placed in line with the load to limit the amount of current in an electrical circuit. It may be a fixed or variable resistor. A familiar and widely used example is the inductive ballast used in fluorescent lamps to limit the current through the tube, which would otherwise rise to a destructive level due to the negative differential resistance of the tube's voltage-current characteristic. Ballasts vary greatly in complexity
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Fluorescent Light
A fluorescent lamp, or fluorescent tube, is a low-pressure mercury-vapor gas-discharge lamp that uses fluorescence to produce visible light. An electric current in the gas excites mercury vapor, which produces short-wave ultraviolet light that then causes a phosphor coating on the inside of the lamp to glow. A fluorescent lamp converts electrical energy into useful light much more efficiently than incandescent lamps. The typical luminous efficacy of fluorescent lighting systems is 50–100 lumens per watt, several times the efficacy of incandescent bulbs with comparable light output. Fluorescent
Fluorescent
lamp fixtures are more costly than incandescent lamps because they require a ballast to regulate the current through the lamp, but the lower energy cost typically offsets the higher initial cost
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Microvolt
The volt (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential, electric potential difference (voltage), and electromotive force.[1] It is named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827).Contents1 Definition1.1 Josephson junction definition2 Water-flow analogy 3 Common voltages 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] One volt is defined as the difference in electric potential between two points of a conducting wire when an electric current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power between those points.[2] It is also equal to the potential difference between two parallel, infinite planes spaced 1 meter apart that create an electric field of 1 newton per coulomb. Additionally, it is the potential difference between two points that will impart one joule of energy per coulomb of charge that passes through it
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Broadband Over Power Lines
Broadband
Broadband
over power lines (BPL) is a method of power line communication (PLC) that allows relatively high-speed digital data transmission over the public electric power distribution wiring. BPL uses higher frequencies, a wider frequency range and different technologies from other forms of power-line communications to provide high-rate communication over longer distances
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FM Broadcast Band
Broadcasting
Broadcasting
is the distribution of audio or video content to a dispersed audience via any electronic mass communications medium, but typically one using the electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves), in a one-to-many model.[1][2] Broadcasting
Broadcasting
began with AM radio, which came into popular use around 1920 with the spread of vacuum tube radio transmitters and receivers. Before this, all forms of electronic communication (early radio, telephone, and telegraph) were one-to-one, with the message intended for a single recipient
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Field Strength
In physics, field strength means the magnitude of a vector-valued field (e.g., in volts per meter, V/m, for an electric field E). For example, electromagnetic field results in both electric field strength and magnetic field strength. As an application, in radio frequency telecommunications, the signal strength excites a receiving antenna and thereby induce a voltage at a specific frequency and polarization in order to provide an input signal to a radio receiver. Field strength meters are used for such applications as cellular, broadcasting, wi-fi and a wide variety of other radio-related applications. See also[edit]Dipole field strength in free space Field strength tensorReferences[edit]This physics-related article is a stub
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