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Park Forest, Illinois
Park Forest is a village located south of Chicago
Chicago
in Cook and Will counties, Illinois, United States. As of the 2010 census, the village had a population of 21,975.[3] Park Forest is bordered by Olympia Fields to the north, Chicago
Chicago
Heights to the east, University Park to the south (formerly Park Forest South), and Richton Park and Matteson to the west.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Transportation 4 Topography 5 Demographics 6 Government 7 Education7.1 Schools8 Arts and culture 9 Notable people 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Developers Nathan Manilow, Carroll F. Sweet and Philip M. Klutznick held a press conference in the Palmer House
Palmer House
in Chicago
Chicago
on October 28, 1946, to announce the planned development of a new self-governing community in Chicago's south suburbs
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211th Street (Lincoln Highway) (Metra)
211th Street (Lincoln Highway) is a commuter rail station along the Main Branch of the Metra Electric line in Olympia Fields, Illinois. It is located at 211th Street between Olympian Way and Olympian Circle, and is 27.62 miles (44.45 km) away from the northern terminus at Millennium Station.[1] In Metra's zone-based fare system, 211th Street Station is in zone F. This station actually straddles three different cities. The northern part of the platform and northern parking lot lies in Olympia Fields, the eastern parking lot in Park Forest, and the western parking lot and bus station in Matteson. The station is named after both of the names for US 30 in Park Forest; Lincoln Highway, and 211th Street. The only other station to be given two street names in one is 147th Street (Sibley Boulevard). 211th Street is built on elevated tracks near the embankment of a bridge over US 30
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Thorn Creek
Thorn Creek is a 20.8-mile-long (33.5 km)[1] tributary of the Little Calumet River that travels through Will and Cook counties in northeastern Illinois just south of Chicago.[2] It starts in the high land of the Valparaiso Moraine before dropping 200 feet (60 m) to the lower elevations of the Little Calumet River valley. Along its path it has cut many deep ravines and valleys. It is usually quite narrow, though the width of the river varies. Under 26th Street in Chicago Heights, a dam built in 1928 forms Sauk Lake (which is very wide), but just north of the street it is just a few feet across. This dam creates an accumulation of several feet of silt in Sauk Lake and is being considered for Notching in 2016 by the Corps of Engineers. The intent is to 'improve stream habitat'
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African-American
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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Sauk Trail
The Sauk Trail
Sauk Trail
began as a Native American trail running through Illinois, Indiana
Indiana
and Michigan
Michigan
in the United States. From west to east, the trail ran from Rock Island on the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
to the Illinois
Illinois
River near modern Peru then along the north bank of that river to Joliet, and on to Valparaiso, Indiana. Then it ran northeasterly to La Porte and into southern Michigan
Michigan
running through Niles, Three Rivers, Ypsilanti, and ending at the Detroit River
Detroit River
near Detroit.[1] There is a suggestion that sections of the trail followed the southern boundary between the dense forest and the mixed grassland regions
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Meteor
A meteoroid (/ˈmiːtiərɔɪd/)[1] is a small rocky or metallic body in outer space. Meteoroids are significantly smaller than asteroids, and range in size from small grains to one-meter-wide objects.[2] Objects smaller than this are classified as micrometeoroids or space dust.[2][3][4] Most are fragments from comets or asteroids, whereas others are collision impact debris ejected from bodies such as the Moon
Moon
or Mars.[5][6][7] When a meteoroid, comet, or asteroid enters Earth's atmosphere at a speed typically in excess of 20 km/s (72,000 km/h; 45,000 mph), aerodynamic heating of that object produces a streak of light, both from the glowing object and the trail of glowing particles that it leaves in its wake. This phenomenon is called a meteor or "shooting star". A series of many meteors appearing seconds or minutes apart and appearing to originate from the same fixed point in the sky is called a meteor shower
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Levittown, Pennsylvania
Levittown is a census-designated place (CDP) and planned community in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States, within the Philadelphia metropolitan area. The population was 52,983 at the 2010 census.[2] It is 40 feet (12 m) above sea level. Though not a municipality, it is sometimes recognized as the largest suburb of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
in Pennsylvania[3] (while Upper Darby Township, Lower Merion Township, Bensalem Township, Abington Township and Bristol Township are municipalities larger in size in the three surrounding Pennsylvania counties). Starting with land purchased in 1951, it was planned and built by Levitt & Sons
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The Good War
"The Good War": An Oral History of World War II
World War II
(1984) is an oral history of World War II
World War II
compiled by Studs Terkel. The work received the 1985 Pulitzer Prize
1985 Pulitzer Prize
for General Non-Fiction. "The Good War" consists of a series of interviews with various men and women from across the globe who directly experienced the events leading up to, including, and following the Second World War.Contents1 Chapters1.1 Book One 1.2 Book Two 1.3 Book Three 1.4 Book Four 1.5 Epilogue: Boom Babies and Other New People2 Critical Reception 3 Subsequent Influence 4 References 5 External linksChapters[edit] The book's chapters and subchapters, with the names and topics of the subjects involved, are as follows: Book One[edit]"Sunday Morning"—John Garcia, Ron Veenker, Dennis Keegan, Peter Ota, Mayor Tom Bradley, Yuriko Hohri, Frank Keegan "A Chance Encounter"—Robert Rasmus, Richard M
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Studs Terkel
Louis "Studs" Terkel (May 16, 1912 – October 31, 2008)[1] was an American author, historian, actor, and broadcaster. He received the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction
Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction
in 1985 for "The Good War", and is best remembered for his oral histories of common Americans, and for hosting a long-running radio show in Chicago.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 Legacy and audio recordings 5 Awards and honors 6 Selected works 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Terkel was born to Samuel Terkel, a Russian Jewish tailor, and Anna (Annie) Finkel, a seamstress, in New York City.[2] At the age of eight he moved with his family to Chicago, Illinois, where he spent most of his life. He had two brothers, Ben (1907–1965) and Meyer (1905–1958). He attended McKinley High School.[3] From 1926 to 1936, his parents ran a rooming house that also served as a meeting place for people from all walks of life
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Planned Communities
A planned community, or planned city, is any community that was carefully planned from its inception and is typically constructed on previously undeveloped greenfield land. This contrasts with settlements that evolve in a more ad hoc fashion. Land use conflicts are less frequent in these communities. The term new town refers to planned communities of the new towns movement in particular, mainly in the United Kingdom
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Palmer House
The Palmer House Hilton
The Palmer House Hilton
is a historic hotel in Chicago
Chicago
in the city's Loop area. Currently operating as the Palmer House - A Hilton Hotel, it is a Historic Hotels of America
Historic Hotels of America
member,[1] the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The Palmer House was the city's first hotel with elevators and the first hotel with electric light bulbs and telephones in the guest rooms
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Philip M. Klutznick
Philip Morris Klutznick (July 9, 1907 – August 14, 1999) was a U.S. administrator who served as U.S. Secretary of Commerce from January 9, 1980 to January 19, 1981 under President Jimmy Carter. He was a prominent leader of several Jewish organisations, including as President of the World Jewish Congress from 1977 to 1979.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Klutznick was born to a Jewish family on July 9, 1907, in Kansas City, Missouri, the son of Morris and Minnie Klutznick, who had emigrated from Poland two years earlier. In 1924, Klutznick participated in the formation of the second chapter of the Jewish fraternal youth organization Aleph Zadik Aleph (AZA). He became Grand Aleph Godol (President) of the expanding organization in 1925
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Meteorite
A meteorite is a solid piece of debris from an object, such as a comet, asteroid, or meteoroid, that originates in outer space and survives its passage through the atmosphere to reach the surface of a planet or moon. When the object enters the atmosphere, various factors like friction, pressure, and chemical interactions with the atmospheric gases cause it to heat up and radiate that energy. It then becomes a meteor and forms a fireball, also known as a shooting star or falling star; astronomers call the brightest examples "bolides." Meteorites vary greatly in size. For geologists, a bolide is a meteorite large enough to create a crater. Meteorites that are recovered after being observed as they transit the atmosphere or impact the Earth
Earth
are called meteorite falls. All others are known as meteorite finds
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