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Papstgrab, Prudentia
Prudence
Prudence
(Latin: prudentia, contracted from providentia meaning "seeing ahead, sagacity") is the ability to govern and discipline oneself by the use of reason.[1] It is classically considered to be a virtue, and in particular one of the four Cardinal virtues (which are, with the three theological virtues, part of the seven virtues). Prudentia
Prudentia
is an allegorical female personification of the virtue, whose attributes are a mirror and snake, who is frequently depicted as a pair with Justitia, the Roman goddess of Justice. The word derives from the 14th-century Old French
Old French
word prudence, which, in turn, derives from the Latin prudentia meaning "foresight, sagacity"
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Prudence (other)
Prudence
Prudence
is a virtue, the exercising of good judgment or wisdom in practical matters
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Stockbroker
A stockbroker is a regulated professional individual, usually associated with a brokerage firm or broker-dealer, who buys and sells stocks and other securities for both retail and institutional clients through a stock exchange or over the counter in return for a fee or commission. Stockbrokers are known by numerous professional designations, depending on the license they hold, the type of securities they sell, or the services they provide. In the United States, a stockbroker must pass both the Series 7 and either the Series 63 or the Series 66 exams in order to be properly licensed.Contents1 History 2 Licensing and training requirements2.1 Canada 2.2 Hong Kong 2.3 India 2.4 Singapore 2.5 United Kingdom 2.6 United States3 Related professions 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]Courtyard of the Amsterdam Stock
Stock
Exchange (Beurs van Hendrick de Keyser) by Emanuel de Witte, 1653
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in Ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BCE to the 6th century CE. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BCE), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BCE), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BCE to the 4th century CE). It is antedated in the second millennium BCE by Mycenaean Greek
Mycenaean Greek
and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Tomb Of Francis II, Duke Of Brittany
The tomb of Francis II, Duke of Brittany
Francis II, Duke of Brittany
is a monument located in Nantes, in the Cathedral of St. Peter. The project was commissioned by Anne of Brittany, Queen of France, who was the daughter of Francis and his second wife Margaret of Foix, who is also depicted beside Francis. The tomb was originally located in the chapel of the Carmelites in Nantes. Francis II had wished that his body rest there, to join the remains of his first wife Margaret of Brittany. The tomb eventually received the body of Francis and both his wives, though only his second wife (Anne's mother) is depicted. It was executed in Carrara marble
Carrara marble
in the early sixteenth century by the sculptor Michel Colombe
Michel Colombe
based on a design by the royal artist Jean Perréal
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Anne Of Brittany
Anne of Brittany
Brittany
(French: Anne de Bretagne; Breton: Anna Breizh) (25/26 January 1477[1] – 9 January 1514[2]) was Duchess of Brittany from 1488 until her death, and queen consort of France
France
from 1491 to 1498 and from 1499 to her death. She is the only woman to have been queen consort of France
France
twice. During the Italian Wars, Anne also became queen consort of Naples, from 1501 to 1504, and duchess consort of Milan, in 1499–1500 and from 1500 to 1512. Anne was raised in Nantes
Nantes
during a series of conflicts in which the king of France
France
sought to assert his suzerainty over Brittany. Her father, Francis II, Duke of Brittany, was the last male of the House of Montfort. Upon his death in 1488, Anne became duchess regnant of Brittany, countess of Nantes, Montfort, and Richmond, and viscountess of Limoges
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Ancient Greece
History
History
of the world · Ancient maritime history Protohistory · Axial Age · Iron Age Historiography · Ancient literature Ancient warfare · Cradle of civilization Category PortalFollowed by Post-classical historyvte Ancient Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ἑλλάς, translit. Hellás) was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. AD 600)
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Christian Philosophy
Christian philosophy
Christian philosophy
is a development in philosophy that is characterised by coming from a Christian tradition.Contents1 Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
and early Christian philosophy 2 Medieval Christian philosophy 3 Renaissance
Renaissance
and Reformation
Reformation
Christian philosophy 4 Modern Christian philosophy4.1 17th century 4.2 18th century 4.3 19th and early 20th century 4.4 Contemporary philosophy5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
and early Christian philosophy[edit] Main article: Christianity
Christianity
and Hellenistic philosophyThis section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Thomas Aquinas
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalvte Part of a series onChristianity JesusChrist Jesus
Jesus
in Christianity Virgin birth Crucifixion ResurrectionBibleFoundations Old Testament New Testament Gospel Canon Books Church Creed New CovenantTheology God Trinity Father Son Holy SpiritApologetics Baptism Christology History of theology Mission SalvationHistoryTradition Mary Apostolic Age Apostles Jewish Christian Peter Paul Ante-Nicene Period Church Fathers Constantine Councils Augustine East–West Schism Crusades Aquinas Luther ReformationRelated topics Art Criticism Ecumenism Liturgy Music Other
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Intelligence
Intelligence
Intelligence
has been defined in many different ways including the capacity for logic, understanding, self-awareness, learning, emotional knowledge, reasoning, planning, creativity, and problem solving. It can be more generally described as the ability to perceive or infer information, and to retain it as knowledge to be applied towards adaptive behaviors within an environment or context. Intelligence
Intelligence
is most widely studied in humans but has also been observed in both non-human animals and in plants
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Free Will
Free will
Free will
is the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded.[1][2] Free will
Free will
is closely linked to the concepts of responsibility, praise, guilt, sin, and other judgements which apply only to actions that are freely chosen. It is also connected with the concepts of advice, persuasion, deliberation, and prohibition. Traditionally, only actions that are freely willed are seen as deserving credit or blame. There are numerous different concerns about threats to the possibility of free will, varying by how exactly it is conceived, which is a matter of some debate. Some conceive free will to be the capacity to make choices in which the outcome has not been determined by past events. Determinism suggests that only one course of events is possible, which is inconsistent with the existence of free will thus conceived
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Temperance (virtue)
Temperance is defined as moderation or voluntary self-restraint.[1] It is typically described in terms of what an individual voluntarily refrains from doing.[2] This includes restraint from retaliation in the form of non-violence and forgiveness, restraint from arrogance in the form of humility and modesty, restraint from excesses such as splurging now in the form of prudence, and restraint from excessive anger or craving for something in the form of calmness and self-control.[2] Temperance has been described as a virtue by religious thinkers, philosophers, and more recently, psychologists, particularly in the positive psychology movement. In classical iconography, the virtue is often depicted as a woman holding two vessels transferring water from one to another
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Josef Pieper
Josef Pieper (German: [ˈpiːpɐ]; 4 May 1904 – 6 November 1997)[1] was a German Catholic
Catholic
philosopher and an important figure in the resurgence of interest in the thought of Thomas Aquinas
Thomas Aquinas
in early-to-mid 20th-century philosophy. Among his most notable works are The Four Cardinal Virtues: Prudence, Justice, Fortitude, Temperance; Leisure, the Basis of Culture; and Guide to Thomas Aquinas
Thomas Aquinas
(published in England as Introduction to Thomas Aquinas).Contents1 Life and career 2 Philosophy 3 Legacy 4 Awards 5 Select publications in English 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLife and career[edit] Pieper studied philosophy, law and sociology at the universities of Berlin and Münster. After working as a sociologist and freelance writer, he became ordinary professor of philosophical anthropology at the University of Münster, and taught there from 1950 to 1976
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God
In monotheistic thought, God
God
is conceived of as the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
and the principal object of faith.[3] The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. In agnostic thought, the existence of God
God
is unknown and/or unknowable
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Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle
(/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/;[3] Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced [aristotélɛːs]; 384–322 BC)[A] was a philosopher during the Classical period in Ancient Greece, the founder of the Lyceum and the Peripatetic school
Peripatetic school
of philosophy and Aristotelian tradition. Along with his teacher Plato, he is considered the "Father of Western Philosophy". His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government. Aristotle
Aristotle
provided a complex synthesis of the various philosophies existing prior to him, and it was above all from his teachings that the West inherited its intellectual lexicon, as well as problems and methods of inquiry
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Natural Law
Natural law
Natural law
(Latin: ius naturale, lex naturalis) is a philosophy asserting that certain rights are inherent by virtue of human nature, endowed by nature—traditionally by God
God
or a transcendent source—and that these can be understood universally through human reason. As determined by nature, the law of nature is implied to be universal,[1] existing independently of the positive law of a given state, political order, legislature or society at large. Historically, natural law refers to the use of reason to analyze human nature to deduce binding rules of moral behavior from nature's or God's creation of reality and mankind. The concept of natural law was first documented in ancient Greek philosophy, including Aristotle,[2] and was referred to in Roman philosophy
Roman philosophy
by Cicero
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