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Panther Swamp National Wildlife Refuge
Panther Swamp
Swamp
National Wildlife Refuge
National Wildlife Refuge
is one of seven refuges in the Theodore Roosevelt National Wildlife Refuge Complex
Theodore Roosevelt National Wildlife Refuge Complex
in Mississippi. Established in 1978, Panther Swamp
Swamp
National Wildlife Refuge encompasses 38,697 acres (156.60 km2). Included in those acres is one of the largest blocks (21,000 acres) of bottomland forest in the lower Mississippi
Mississippi
River alluvial floodplain. The upland areas or ridges often crest at no more than one foot above swamp areas, and contain nuttall, willow and water oaks and other species while overcup oak, bitter pecan and ash dominate the transition zone from swamp to upland
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IUCN
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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Otter
Amblonyx Aonyx Enhydra Hydrictis Lontra Lutra Lutrogale Pteronura †Enhydriodon[2][3] †Algarolutra †Cyrnaonyx †Megalenhydris †Sardolutra †Siamogale †Teruelictis †Enhydritherium †Limnonyx †Lutravus †Sivaonyx †Torolutra †Tyrrhenolutra †VishnuonyxOtters are carnivorous mammals in the subfamily Lutrinae. The 13 extant otter species are all semiaquatic, aquatic or marine, with diets based on fish and invertebrates. Lutrinae is a branch of the weasel family Mustelidae, which also includes badgers, honey badgers, martens, minks, polecats, and wolverines.Contents1 Etymology 2 Terminology 3 Life cycle 4 Characteristics 5 Species5.1 European otter 5.2 North American river otter 5.3 Sea otter 5.4 Giant otter6 Relation with humans6.1 Hunting 6.2 Fishing for humans 6.3 Religion and mythology6.3.1 Japanese folklore7 References 8 External linksEtymology The word otter derives from the Old English word otor or oter
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Swamp Rabbit
The swamp rabbit ( Sylvilagus
Sylvilagus
aquaticus), or swamp hare,[3] is a large cottontail rabbit found in the swamps and wetlands of the southern United States. Other common names for the swamp rabbit include marsh rabbit and cane-cutter
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Wild Turkey
6, see textDistribution of M. gallopavoThe wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an upland ground bird native to North America
North America
and is the heaviest member of the diverse Galliformes. It is the same species as the domestic turkey, which was originally derived from a southern Mexican subspecies of wild turkey (not the related ocellated turkey). Although native to North America, the turkey probably got its name from the domesticated variety being imported to Britain in ships coming from the Levant
Levant
via Spain
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Squirrel
and see textSquirrels are members of the family Sciuridae, a family that includes small or medium-size rodents. The squirrel family includes tree squirrels, ground squirrels, chipmunks, marmots (including woodchucks), flying squirrels, and prairie dogs amongst other rodents. Squirrels are indigenous to the Americas, Eurasia, and Africa, and were introduced by humans to Australia.[1] The earliest known squirrels date from the Eocene
Eocene
period and are most closely related to the mountain beaver and to the dormouse among other living rodent families.Contents1 Etymology 2 Characteristics 3 Behavior3.1 Feeding4 Taxonomy 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEtymology That word "squirrel", first attested in 1327, comes from the Anglo-Norman esquirel which is from the Old French
Old French
escurel, the reflex of a Latin word sciurus
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Raccoon
Ursus lotor Linnaeus, 1758The raccoon (/rəˈkuːn/ or US: /ræˈkuːn/ ( listen), Procyon
Procyon
lotor), sometimes spelled racoon,[3] also known as the common raccoon,[4] North American raccoon,[5] northern raccoon,[6] colloquially as coon or trash panda[7] is a medium-sized mammal native to North America. The raccoon is the largest of the procyonid family, having a body length of 40 to 70 cm (16 to 28 in) and a body weight of 5 to 26 kg (11 to 57 lb).[8] Its grayish coat mostly consists of dense underfur which insulates it against cold weather. Three of the raccoon's most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws, its facial mask, and its ringed tail, which are themes in the mythologies of the indigenous peoples of the Americas
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United States Geological Survey
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[2] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
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American Alligator
The American alligator
American alligator
( Alligator
Alligator
mississippiensis), sometimes referred to colloquially as a gator or common alligator, is a large crocodilian reptile endemic to the southeastern United States. It is one of two living species in the genus Alligator
Alligator
within the family Alligatoridae; it is larger than the other extant alligator species, the Chinese alligator. Adult male American alligators measure 3.4 to 4.6 m (11 to 15 ft) in length, and can weigh up to 453 kg (1,000 lb). Females are smaller, measuring 2.6 to 3 m (8.5 to 9.8 ft) in length. The American alligator inhabits freshwater wetlands, such as marshes and cypress swamps from Texas
Texas
to North Carolina
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Copyright Status Of Work By The U.S. Government
A work of the United States
United States
government, as defined by the United States copyright law, is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties."[1] In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act,[2] such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This act only applies to U.S. domestic copyright as that is the extent of U.S. federal law. The U.S. government asserts that it can still hold the copyright to those works in other countries.[3][4] Publication of an otherwise protected work by the U.S. government does not put that work in the public domain. For example, government publications may include works copyrighted by a contractor or grantee; copyrighted material assigned to the U.S
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Protected Areas Of The United States
The protected areas of the United States
United States
are managed by an array of different federal, state, tribal and local level authorities and receive widely varying levels of protection. Some areas are managed as wilderness, while others are operated with acceptable commercial exploitation. As of 2015[update], the 25,800 protected areas covered 1,294,476 km2 (499,800 sq mi), or 14 percent of the land area of the United States.[2] This is also one-tenth of the protected land area of the world. The U.S. also had a total of 787 National Marine Protected Areas, covering an additional 1,271,408 km2 (490,893 sq mi), or 12 percent of the total marine area of the United States.[2] Some areas are managed in concert between levels of government
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Federal Government Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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National Historic Sites (United States)
A National Historic Site (NHS) is a protected area of national historic significance in the United States. An NHS usually contains a single historical feature directly associated with its subject. A related but separate designation, the National Historical Park
National Historical Park
(NHP), is an area that generally extends beyond single properties or buildings, and its resources include a mix of historic and sometimes significant natural features. As of 2015, there are 50 NHPs and 90 NHSs. Most NHPs and NHSs are managed by the National Park Service
National Park Service
(NPS). Some federally designated sites are owned by local authorities or privately owned, but are authorized to request assistance from the NPS as affiliated areas
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National Trails System
The National Trails System was created by the National Trails System Act (Pub.L. 90–543, 82 Stat. 919, enacted October 2, 1968), codified at 16 U.S.C. § 1241 et seq. The Act created a series of National trails "to promote the preservation of, public access to, travel within, and enjoyment and appreciation of the open-air, outdoor areas and historic resources of the Nation." Specifically, the Act authorized three types of trails: the National Scenic Trails, National Recreation Trails and connecting-and-side trails. The 1968 Act also created two national scenic trails: the Appalachian and the Pacific Crest; and requested that an additional fourteen trail routes be studied for possible inclusion. In 1978, as a result of the study of trails that were most significant for their historic associations, a fourth category of trail was added: the National Historic Trails
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