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Pandya Coinage
The earliest coins of the Pandyan Kingdom
Pandyan Kingdom
were copper squares and were struck with a die. The coins were with five distinct images on one side, often an image of an elephant on that side and a stylised fish on the other, seen typically in the coins found around Korkai, their ancient capital and in Northern Lanka. These rectangular coins of the early Pandyans also featured the Nandi bull and contain Chakrams. The ”Chakram” consists of two lines forming an acute angle, the apex being uppermost ; with are two crossed lines parallel to the sides of the angle which they join. All four lines end at the bottom of the symbol on the same level
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Early Pandyan Kingdom
The Early Pandyas of the Sangam period
Sangam period
were one of the four main kingdoms of the ancient Tamil country, the other three being the Cholas, the Cheras and Athiyamaan Dynasty. As with many other kingdoms around this period (earlier than 200 BCE), most of the information about the Early Pandyas come to us mainly through literary sources and some epigraphic, archaeological and numismatic evidence.[1] The capital of the Early Pandyan kingdom was initially Korkai, Thoothukudi around 600 BCE,[2] and was later moved to Koodal (now Madurai) during the reign of Nedunjeliyan I.[3] The kings of the Pandyan Dynasty are frequently mentioned in Sangam literature of the third century BCE and onwards, in literary works such as the Mathuraikkanci and other early Tamil literary works such as Cilapatikaram, which have been used by historians to identify their names and, to some extent, their genealogy
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Denomination (currency)
Denomination is a proper description of a currency amount, usually for coins or banknotes. Denominations may also be used with other means of payment like gift cards. For example, five euros is the denomination of a five euro note. Contents1 Subunit and super unit 2 Decimal vs. non-decimal 3 Choice of name 4 See also 5 ReferencesSubunit and super unit[edit] In a currency, there is usually a main unit (base), and a subunit that is a fraction of the main unit. In some countries, there are multiple levels of subunits. In the former Ottoman Empire, 1 lira = 100 kuruş = 4000 para = 12000 akçe. Today, only a few places have more than one subunit, notably the Jordanian dinar
Jordanian dinar
is divided into 10 dirham, 100 qirsh/piastres, or 1000 fils. Many countries where Western European languages are spoken currently have their main units divided into 100 subunits
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Bhutanese Ngultrum
The ngultrum (Dzongkha: དངུལ་ཀྲམ [ŋul'tram], symbol: Nu., code: BTN) is the currency of the Kingdom of Bhutan. It is subdivided into 100 chhertum (Dzongkha: ཕྱེད་ཏམ [tʃet'tam], spelled as chetrums on coins until 1979). The Royal Monetary Authority of Bhutan
Bhutan
is the minting authority of the Ngultrum banknotes and coins. The Ngultrum is currently pegged to the Indian rupee at parity.Contents1 History 2 Coins 3 Banknotes3.1 Previous series 3.2 Present series 3.3 Commemorative notes4 Exchange rate 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Until 1789, the coins of the Cooch Behar
Cooch Behar
mint circulated in Bhutan. Following this, Bhutan
Bhutan
began issuing its own coins known as chetrum, mostly silver ½ rupees
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Nepalese Rupee
The Nepalese rupee
Nepalese rupee
(Nepali: रुपैयाँ, symbol: रु, Rs.; code: NPR) is the official currency of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. The Nepalese rupee
Nepalese rupee
is subdivided into 100 paisa. The issuance of the currency is controlled by the Nepal
Nepal
Rastra Bank, the central bank of Nepal
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Sri Lankan Rupee
The rupee (Sinhalese: රුපියල්, Tamil: ரூபாய்) (signs: රු, ரூ, Rs; code: LKR) is the currency of Sri Lanka, divided into 100 cents. It is issued by the Central Bank of Sri Lanka. The abbreviation is generally Rs., but SLRs. is occasionally used to distinguish it from other currencies also called rupee.Contents1 History 2 Coins2.1 Commemorative coins3 Banknotes 4 Exchange rate 5 See also 6 References6.1 Footnotes 6.2 Notes 6.3 Sources7 External linksHistory[edit] The British pound became Ceylon's official money of account in 1825, replacing the Ceylonese rixdollar at a rate of 1 pound = ​13 1⁄3 rixdollars, and British silver coin was made legal tender. Treasury notes denominated in pounds were issued in 1827, replacing the earlier rixdollar notes
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Pakistani Rupee
The Pakistani rupee
Pakistani rupee
(Urdu: روپیہ‬‎ / ALA-LC: Rūpiyah; sign: ₨; code: PKR) is the currency of Pakistan. The issuance of the currency is controlled by the State Bank of Pakistan, the central bank of the country. The most commonly used symbol for the rupee is Rs, used on receipts when purchasing goods and services. In Pakistan, the rupee is also spelled as "rupees", "rupaya" or "rupaye"
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Indian Rupee
   Nepal  Bhutan[a]  Zimbabwe[b][1]IssuanceCentral bank Reserve Bank of IndiaPrinter Reserve Bank of India Website www.rbi.org.inMint India
India
Government Mint Website www.spmcil.comValuationInflation 4.4% (2017-18) Source RBI - Annual Inflation Report Method CPI[2]Pegged by Bhutanese ngultrum
Bhutanese ngultrum
(at par) Nepalese rupee
Nepalese rupee
(1 INR = 1.6 NPR)^ Alongside the Bhutanese ngultrum ^ Alongside the US dollar, South African rand
South African rand
and Botswana pulaThe Indian rupee
Indian rupee
(sign: ₹ ; code: INR), is the official currency of the Republic of India. The rupee is subdivided into 100 paise (singular paisa), though as of 2011, coins of denomination 25 paise and less are no longer legal tender
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Travancore Rupee
The Travancore
Travancore
rupee was a type of currency issued by the State of Travancore, now mainly a part of Kerala
Kerala
in South India. The rupee was largely a newer currency in comparison to the older currencies of Kerala
Kerala
such as the Fanams, Achus, Chuckrams as well as the Kasu (or Cash). Its creation was probably intended for the increased trading with British India
British India
and the high value transactions therein. Travancore
Travancore
Rupee
Rupee
- Front Travancore
Travancore
Rupee
Rupee
- ReverseThe Travancore
Travancore
Rupee
Rupee
was the highest denomination of currency issued for general circulation. The highest face value issued was the '1/2 rupee'
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Dam (Indian Coin)
A Dam was a small Indian copper coin. The coin was first introduced by Sher Shah Suri
Sher Shah Suri
during his rule of India
India
between 1540 and 1545, along with Mohur, the gold coin and Rupiya
Rupiya
the silver coin[1] Later on, the Mughal Emperors
Mughal Emperors
standardised the coin along with other silver (Rupiya) and gold (Mohur) coins in order to consolidate the monetary system across India. It is believed that this coin is one of the possible sources for the English phrase “I don't give a dam[n]″, due to its small worth.[2] See also[edit]Mohur History of RupeeReferences[edit]^ Mughal Coinage Archived 2008-05-16 at the Wayback Machine. at RBI Monetary Museum. Retrieved on 4 May 2008. ^ Gorrell, Robert, Watch Your Language: Mother Tongue and Her Wayward Children, University of Nevada Press, 1994
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Cash (currency)
Cash
Cash
is a name for several historical currencies used in Asia. It is applied to units used in China, Vietnam, and the Princely states
Princely states
of Madras and Travancore
Travancore
in British India. It is also occasionally used to refer to the Korean mun
Korean mun
and the Japanese mon. Skr. karsha 'a weight of silver or gold equal to ​1⁄400 of a tulā' (Williams); Singhalese kāsi coin. The early Portuguese writers represented the native word by cas, casse, caxa, the Fr. by cas, the Eng. by cass: the existing Pg. caixa and Eng. cash are due to a natural confusion with CASH n.1. From an early date the Portuguese applied caixa (probably on the same analogy) to the small money of other foreign nations, such as that of Maritime Southeast Asia, and especially the Chinese, which was also naturally made into cash in English
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Yansheng Coin
Yansheng Coin
Yansheng Coin
(simplified Chinese: 厌胜钱; traditional Chinese: 厭勝錢; pinyin: yàn shèng qián), is a kind of special coin used mainly for ritual uses. It was very popular in ancient China and even the Republic of China
Republic of China
era. Normally these coins are privately funded or cast, such as by a rich family for their own family ceremony. It's not a real kind of currency, and cannot be circulated in market. The collection (e.g. antique collection, coin collection) of this kind of coins has a long history, and has been very popular since the Western Han
Western Han
Dynasty
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Kutch Kori
The Kori was the currency of Kutch
Kutch
until 1948. It was subdivided into 24 Dokda (singular Dokdo ), each of 2 Trambiyo. Only coins were issued. Other copper coins in use were called Dhabbu and Dhinglo. The Kori was replaced by the Indian rupee
Indian rupee
at a rate of 1 Rupee = 3½ Koris. 1 Kori = 2 Adlinao = 4 Payalo = 8 Dhabu = 16 Dhinglo = 24 Dokda = 48 Trambiyo = 96 Babukiya References[edit]Krause, Chester L.; Clifford Mishler (1991). Standard Catalog of World Coins: 1801–1991 (18th ed.). Krause Publications. ISBN 0873411501. This article about a unit of currency is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t e   This Indian history-related article is a stub
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Post-Mauryan Coinage Of Gandhara
The Post-Mauryan coinage
Post-Mauryan coinage
of Gandhara
Gandhara
refers to the period of coinage production in Gandhara, following the breakup of the Maurya Empire (321-185 BCE). When Mauryan central power disappeared, several small independent entities were formed, which started to strike their own coins, defining a period of Post-Mauryan coinage
Post-Mauryan coinage
that ends with the rise of the Gupta Empire
Gupta Empire
in the 4th century CE
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Maldivian Rufiyaa
The Maldivian rufiyaa
Maldivian rufiyaa
(Dhivehi: ދިވެހި ރުފިޔާ; sign: Rf or .ރ; code: MVR) is the currency of the Maldives. The issuance of the currency is controlled by the Maldives
Maldives
Monetary Authority (MMA). The most commonly used symbols for the rufiyaa are MRF and Rf. The ISO 4217 code for Maldivian rufiyaa
Maldivian rufiyaa
is MVR. The rufiyaa is subdivided into 100 laari. The name "rufiyaa" is derived from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
rupya (wrought silver)
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Economy Of India
The economy of India
India
is a developing mixed economy.[33] It is the world's sixth-largest economy by nominal GDP and the third-largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). The country ranks 141st in per capita GDP (nominal) with $1723 and 123rd in per capita GDP (PPP) with $6,616 as of 2016.[34][35] After 1991 economic liberalisation, India
India
achieved 6-7% average GDP growth annually
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