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Pandit
A pandit (Sanskrit: पण्डित, translit. paṇḍita; also spelled pundit, pronounced /ˈpʌndɪt, ˈpændɪt/;[1] abbreviated as Pt. or Pdt.; Panditain or Punditain can refer to a female pundit or the wife of a pundit) is a Brahmin
Brahmin
scholar[2] or a teacher of any field of knowledge in Hinduism, particularly the Vedic scriptures, dharma, Hindu philosophy, or secular subjects such as music.[3] He may be a Guru
Guru
in a Gurukul
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Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
Random House
Random House
Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
Dictionary
is a large American dictionary, first published in 1966 as The Random House
Random House
Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language: The Unabridged Edition. Edited by Jess Stein, it contained 315,000 entries in 2256 pages, as well as 2400 illustrations. The CD-ROM
CD-ROM
version in 1994 also included 120,000 spoken pronunciations.[1] History[edit] The Random House
Random House
publishing company entered the reference book market after World War II. They acquired rights to the Century Dictionary
Dictionary
and the Dictionary
Dictionary
of American English, both out of print
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Monier Williams
Sir Monier Monier-Williams
Monier Monier-Williams
(né Monier Williams), KCIE (/ˈmɒnjər/; 12 November 1819 – 11 April 1899) was the second Boden Professor of Sanskrit
Sanskrit
at Oxford University, England. He studied, documented and taught Asian languages, especially Sanskrit, Persian and Hindustani.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Writings and foundations 4 Honours 5 Published works5.1 Translations 5.2 Original works6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Monier Williams was born in Bombay, the son of Colonel Monier Williams, surveyor-general in the Bombay
Bombay
presidency. His surname was "Williams" until 1887 when he added his Christian name to his surname to create the hyphenated "Monier-Williams". In 1822 he was sent to England to be educated at private schools at Hove, Chelsea and Finchley
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Utsava
Uthsava or Utsava
Utsava
or Utsav is derived from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word, Utsava. Utsava
Utsava
generally means a festival or celebration or any joyous occasion.[1][2] It also carries the meaning of delight, merriment and pleasure.[3] The Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word Utsava
Utsava
comes from the word "ut" meaning "removal" and "sava" which means "worldly sorrows" or "grief".[4] See also[edit]Brahmotsavam Moolavar VasanthotsavamReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Utsava.^ Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Dictionary ^ Utsava
Utsava
- Lets celebrate life ^ nathdwara.in ^ Sri Venkateswara Swami Temple of Greater ChicagoFurther reading[edit]Davis, Richard H. (2009). A Priest's Guide for the Great Festival Aghorasiva's Mahotsavavidhi. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-537852-0
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Vrata
Vrata
Vrata
is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word that means "vow, resolve, devotion",[1] and refers to pious observances such as fasting and pilgrimage (Tirtha) found in Indian religions such as
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Public Domain
The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Saraswat Brahmin
The Saraswats are a sub-group of Hindu
Hindu
Brahmins of India who trace their ancestry to the banks of the Sarasvati River. In Kalhana's Rajatarangini
Rajatarangini
(12th century CE), the Saraswats are mentioned as one of the five Pancha Gauda Brahmin
Brahmin
communities residing to the north of the Vindhyas.[1] They were spread over a wide area in northern part of the Indian subcontinent. One group lived in coastal Sindh
Sindh
and Gujarat,this group migrated to Bombay State
Bombay State
after the partition of India in 1947. One group was found in pre-partition Punjab and Kashmir most of these migrated away from Pakistan after 1947. Another branch, known as Goud Saraswat Brahmin, are now found along the western coast of India.[2] References[edit]^ D. Shyam Babu and Ravindra S. Khare, ed. (2011). Caste in Life: Experiencing Inequalities
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List Of Saraswats
This list comprises notable Saraswat Brahmins divided by profession. Politics[edit]Beena Kak, Minister, Rajasthan[1] P. N. Haksar[2] Tej Bahadur Sapru[3]Cinema[edit]Guru Dutt[4] M. K. Raina[5] Mani Kaul[6] Shyam Benegal[7]References[edit]^ " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Government - Council of Ministers". Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Legislative Assembly Secretariat. Retrieved 28 March 2010.  ^ Singh, Kuldeep (2 December 1998). "Obituary: P.N. Haksar". www.independent.co.uk. Retrieved 16 July 2013.  ^ Mohan Kumar. Sir Tej Bahadur Sapru: a political biography. Vipul Prakashan. Retrieved 2007-03-25. Even now there are many distinguished scholars of Persian among the Kashmiri Brahmins in India. Sir Tej Bahadur Sapru and Raja Narendranath to mention two of them.  ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2007/sep/20dutt.htm ^ "Slow trotter, going places ..." www.hindu.com
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Yajna
Yajna
Yajna
(IAST: yajña) literally means "sacrifice, devotion, worship, offering", and refers in Hinduism
Hinduism
to any ritual done in front of a sacred fire, often with mantras.[1] Yajna
Yajna
has been a Vedic tradition, described in a layer of Vedic literature called Brahmanas, as well as Yajurveda.[2] The tradition has evolved from offering oblations and libations into sacred fire to symbolic offerings in the presence of sacred fire (Agni).[1] Yajna
Yajna
rituals-related texts have been called the Karma-kanda (ritual works) portion of the Vedic literature, in contrast to Jnana-kanda (knowledge) portion contained in the Vedic Upanishads
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Epic India
Bharata Khanda
Bharata Khanda
(or Bharata Ksetra[1]) is a term used in Hindu texts, including the Vedas, Mahabharata, Ramayana
Ramayana
and the Puranic, to describe the geographic region that encompassed the modern countries of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Myanmar—that is, South Asia
South Asia
at the term's furthest extent
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Vaidya
Vaidya (Sanskrit: वैद्य) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word meaning "physician".[1] It is also used unchanged in modern Indo-Aryan languages such as Hindi.[2] It was and is used generally in India
India
to refer to a person who practises ayurveda, an indigenous Indian system of medicine.[3] Senior practitioners or teachers were called Vaidyarāja "physician-king" as a mark of respect.Some practitioners who had complete knowledge of the texts and were excellent at their practices were known as " Pranaacharya". Some royal families in India had a personal vaidya in attendance and these people were referred to as Rāja Vaidya "the king's physician"[4][5]In the classical text, Charakh Sahinta ( Chapter 29 of Sutrasthan) the term Vaidya is classified into 2 types:1
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Guru
Guru
Guru
(Sanskrit: गुरु
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Romanization Of Sanskrit
There are several methods of transliteration from Devanāgarī
Devanāgarī
to the Roman script (a process known as romanization) which share similarities, although no single system of transliteration has emerged[dubious – discuss] as the standard.[1] This process has been termed Romanagari, a portmanteau of the words Roman and Devanagari, a slang word used particularly by bloggers to describe the romanization of Hindi
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