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Pager
A pager (also known as a beeper) is a wireless telecommunications device that receives and displays alphanumeric messages and/or receives and announces voice messages. One-way pagers can only receive messages, while response pagers and two-way pagers can also acknowledge, reply to, and originate messages using an internal transmitter.[1] Pagers operate as part of a paging system which includes one or more fixed transmitters (or in the case of response pagers and two-way pagers, one or more base stations), as well as a number of pagers carried by mobile users. These systems can range from a restaurant system with a single low-power transmitter, to a nationwide system with thousands of high-power base stations. Pagers were developed in the 1950s and 1960s, and became widely used by the 1980s
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Sir Mix-a-Lot
Anthony Ray (born August 12, 1963), better known by his stage name Sir Mix-a-Lot, is an American rapper and recording producer. He is best known for his hit song "Baby Got Back". Born and raised in Seattle, Washington, he grew up in Seattle’s Central District and graduated from Roosevelt High School in 1981. Early on, Sir Mix-A-Lot had an ear and a passion for music. Soon after high school he began DJing parties at local community centers.[1] By 1983 Mix-A-Lot had begun playing weekends regularly at the Rainier Vista Boys and Girls Club in South Seattle. Soon he moved locations and started throwing his parties at the Rotary Boys and Girls Club in the Central District. It was there that he met ‘Nasty’ Nes Rodriguez, a local radio DJ and host of Fresh Tracks, the West Coast’s first rap radio show on Seattle station KKFX (KFOX)
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EIRP
Effective radiated power
Effective radiated power
(ERP), synonymous with equivalent radiated power, is an IEEE standardized definition of directional radio frequency (RF) power, such as that emitted by a radio transmitter. It is the total power in watts that would have to be radiated by a half-wave dipole antenna to give the same radiation intensity (signal strength in watts per square meter) as the actual source at a distant receiver located in the direction of the antenna's strongest beam (main lobe). ERP measures the combination of the power emitted by the transmitter and the ability of the antenna to direct that power in a given direction. It is equal to the input power to the antenna multiplied by the gain of the antenna
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2005 London Bombings
The 7 July 2005 London bombings, often referred to as 7/7, were a series of coordinated terrorist suicide attacks in London, United Kingdom, which targeted commuters travelling on the city's public transport system during the morning rush hour. Four Islamic terrorists separately detonated three bombs in quick succession aboard London Underground trains across the city and, later, a fourth on a double-decker bus in Tavistock Square.[1] The train bombings occurred on the Circle line near Aldgate and at Edgware Road, and on the Piccadilly line near Russell Square. Fifty-two people, all UK residents but of 18 different nationalities, were killed and more than 700 were injured in the attacks, making it Britain's deadliest terrorist incident since the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, as well as the country's first Islamic suicide attack. The explosions were caused by homemade organic peroxide-based devices packed into backpacks
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TETRA
Terrestrial Trunked Radio[1] (TETRA; formerly known as Trans-European Trunked Radio), a European standard for a trunked radio system, is a professional mobile radio[2] and two-way transceiver specification. TETRA
TETRA
was specifically designed for use by government agencies, emergency services, (police forces, fire departments, ambulance) for public safety networks, rail transport staff for train radios, transport services and the military.[3] Comparison between TETRA
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Three 6 Mafia
Three 6 Mafia
Three 6 Mafia
(also rendered as Da Mafia 6ix) is a hip-hop group formed in 1991 in Memphis, Tennessee. Their style has been variously described as horrorcore, crunk and gangsta rap. In 2006 the group won the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 78th Academy Awards for their song "It's Hard out Here for a Pimp" from the movie Hustle & Flow. The group released their debut album Mystic Stylez
Mystic Stylez
in 1995 through Prophet Entertainment, a record label they created but have since relinquished control of. Their musical style—which initially featured dark, menacing beats with equally gritty lyrics—has since moved to a less dark style. The group has also had numerous lineup changes, and now (due to contract disputes) performs under the group name of Da Mafia 6ix
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Email
Electronic Mail
Mail
(email or e-mail) is a method of exchanging messages ("mail") between people using electronic devices. Email
Email
first entered limited use in the 1960s and by the mid-1970s had taken the form now recognized as email. Email
Email
operates across computer networks, which today is primarily the Internet. Some early email systems required the author and the recipient to both be online at the same time, in common with instant messaging. Today's email systems are based on a store-and-forward model. Email
Email
servers accept, forward, deliver, and store messages
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Emergency Service
Emergency
Emergency
services and rescue services[1] are organizations which ensure public safety and health by addressing different emergencies. Some of these agencies exist solely for addressing certain types of emergencies whilst others deal with ad hoc emergencies as part of their normal responsibilities
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Watt
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
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Subsidiary Communications Authority
Subsidiary Communications Authorization (SCA) in the United States, and Subsidiary Communications Multiplex Operation (SCMO) in Canada, is a subcarrier on a radio station, allowing the station to broadcast additional services as part of its signal.Contents1 Background 2 Receiving the SCA Signal 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBackground[edit] "Subsidiary Communications Authorization" is the United States Federal Communications Commission's official designation for this type of service
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Reflex
A reflex, or reflex action, is an involuntary and nearly instantaneous movement in response to a stimulus.[1][2] A reflex is made possible by neural pathways called reflex arcs which can act on an impulse before that impulse reaches the brain. The reflex is then an automatic response to a stimulus that does not receive or need conscious thought.[3]Contents1 Human reflexes1.1 Tendon reflex 1.2 Reflexes involving cranial nerves 1.3 Reflexes usually only observed in human infants 1.4 Other reflexes 1.5 Grading2 See also 3 ReferencesHuman reflexes[edit] Myotatic reflexes The myotatic reflexes (also known as deep tendon reflexes), provide information on the integrity of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system
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Simulcast
Simulcast, a portmanteau of simultaneous broadcast, is the broadcasting of programs or events across more than one medium, or more than one service on the same medium, at exactly the same time (that is, simultaneously). For example, Absolute Radio
Absolute Radio
is simulcast on both AM and on satellite radio.[1][2] Likewise, the BBC's Prom concerts were formerly simulcast on both BBC
BBC
Radio 3 and BBC Television. Another application is the transmission of the original-language soundtrack of movies or TV series over local or Internet radio, with the television broadcast having been dubbed into a local language.Contents1 Early radio simulcasts 2 Simulcasting to provide stereo sound for TV broadcasts 3 Other uses3.1 Simulcasting of sporting events4 See also 5 ReferencesEarly radio simulcasts[edit] Before launching stereo radio, experiments were conducted by transmitting left and right channels on different radio channels
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Capture Effect
In telecommunications, the capture effect, or FM capture effect, is a phenomenon associated with FM reception in which only the stronger of two signals at, or near, the same frequency or channel will be demodulated. The capture effect is defined as the complete suppression of the weaker signal at the receiver limiter (if it has one) where the weaker signal is not amplified, but attenuated. When both signals are nearly equal in strength, or are fading independently, the receiver may switch from one to the other and exhibit picket fencing. The capture effect can occur at the signal limiter, or in the demodulation stage, for circuits that do not require a signal limiter.[citation needed] Some types of radio receiver circuits have a stronger capture effect than others. The measurement of how well a receiver can reject a second signal on the same frequency is called the capture ratio for a specific receiver
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Privacy
Privacy
Privacy
is the ability of an individual or group to seclude themselves, or information about themselves, and thereby express themselves selectively. The boundaries and content of what is considered private differ among cultures and individuals, but share common themes. When something is private to a person, it usually means that something is inherently special or sensitive to them. The domain of privacy partially overlaps security (confidentiality), which can include the concepts of appropriate use, as well as protection of information. Privacy
Privacy
may also take the form of bodily integrity.[1] The right not to be subjected to unsanctioned invasion of privacy by the government, corporations or individuals is part of many countries' privacy laws, and in some cases, constitutions. Almost all countries have laws which in some way limit privacy
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Plot (narrative)
Plot refers to the sequence of events inside a story which affect other events through the principle of cause and effect. The causal events of a plot can be thought of as a series of sentences linked by "and so". Plots can vary from simple structures such as in a traditional ballad to complex interwoven structures sometimes referred to as an imbroglio. The term plot can serve as a verb and refer to a character planning future actions in the story. In the narrative sense, the term highlights the important points which have important consequences within the story, according to Ansen Dibell.[1] The term is similar in meaning to the term storyline.[2][3]Contents1 Definition1.1 Fabula and syuzhet2 Structure 3 Aristotle 4 Freytag4.1 Exposition 4.2 Rising action 4.3 Climax 4.4 Falling action 4.5 Denouement5 Plot devices 6 Plot outline 7 A-Plot 8 Plot Summary 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksDefinition[edit] English novelist E. M
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Ice Cube
O'Shea Jackson Sr. (born June 15, 1969), known professionally as Ice Cube, is an American rapper and actor
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